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  1. #1
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    Default DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-US: Exorcising the Ghosts of Slavery

    Just read this very good article about Dominico-Haitian relations on the topic of color and the presidential election of Obama. Yes it deals with color so please lets behave or this will be closed by the powers that be.There was a mock election in the Hotel Jargua the night of the elections. The results were 53 votes for John McCain and 448 for Barack Obama.


    SANTO DOMINGO, Nov 5 (IPS) - On the island where the African slave trade was first introduced to the western hemisphere in 1520, the United States embassy in Santo Domingo hosted more than 1,000 people to view the possible election of the son of an African to the U.S. presidency.
    Btw the article was written by Elizabeth Eames Roebling aka our own mountainannie.

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-US: Exorcising the Ghosts of Slavery

  2. #2
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    I do not see the point of the article. Iím sure Dominicans do not consider Barack Obama as an Afro-American in itís accepted definition of being a member of a social group who after several generations still identifies itself with being descendants of African slaves, who have sought redress for the injustice of their ancestorís slavery. Iím sure Dominicans see Barack Obama as a son of an immigrant who through sweat and toil, and taking advantages of the opportunities offered by the US political system, managed to attain the highest office in that nation.

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    JR;

    I totally agree with your premise vis-a-vis Obama being viewed as the son of immigrants and totally disassociated with the "slavery" issues whichwere so promanently displayed during the election campaign.
    For too long America's black community has kept this issue alive, repeatedly demanding an apology from everyone for having brought slaves to the New World.
    What happened over 200 years ago has nothing to do with society today and the issue should be put to bed once and for all.
    We should concern ourselves with what is happening today because what happened 200 years ago is buried in the battlefields.

    TB

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRMirador View Post
    I do not see the point of the article. Iím sure Dominicans do not consider Barack Obama as an Afro-American in itís accepted definition of being a member of a social group who after several generations still identifies itself with being descendants of African slaves, who have sought redress for the injustice of their ancestorís slavery. Iím sure Dominicans see Barack Obama as a son of an immigrant who through sweat and toil, and taking advantages of the opportunities offered by the US political system, managed to attain the highest office in that nation.
    EVERY Dominican that I have spoken to considers Barack Obama an Afro-American.................
    SHALENA

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    I do not think they think of him as an African-American, but rather as "one of them" and Dominicans do not think of themselves as being "black" per se....they recognize color, but their mind set is Spanish or European oriented, not African (except for some folklorists).
    This was obvious back in the 1820s, 30s, as the Haitian domination took place, part of the issues were that the people in the East did not think of themselves as black as were their neighbors to the West, and they resented being ruled by these dark neighbors...

    However, Obama does raise a lot of sympathy because of his very Hispanic looks...And, as a minority, he obviously got a lot of Latin votes....

    We'll see down the line how his administration deals with issues close to Dominican hearts..

    To me, the most important issue is that he got where he is through education. This is being trumpeted by many successful people of color: Stay in school....

    I remember a wonderful fellow Peace Corps Volunteer, Sally Robinson, who once told us:"I can't dance and I can't sing so I studied!!" And this was over 40 years ago....
    Remember that there are more male blacks in prison than in college, according to Charles Barkley..

    If Obama can incite a revolution among that 20% of the population, can you imagine the minds that will be tapped? Another Carver? Another Obama? Who knows...

    HB

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRMirador View Post
    I do not see the point of the article. I’m sure Dominicans do not consider Barack Obama as an Afro-American in it’s accepted definition of being a member of a social group who after several generations still identifies itself with being descendants of African slaves, who have sought redress for the injustice of their ancestor’s slavery. I’m sure Dominicans see Barack Obama as a son of an immigrant who through sweat and toil, and taking advantages of the opportunities offered by the US political system, managed to attain the highest office in that nation.
    I agree. In fact, what many Dominican expatriates have been saying over and over is how he opened the door for the sons of immigrants to make it to the White House. Of course, many fail to see that socio-economic class is more important than anything (the Obamas are not particularly poor or uneducated, in fact they have an upper class elite education - typical of most U.S. presidents), but that's another matter all together.

    BTW, Obama is a partial descendant of an African, but he certainly is not a descendant of slaves. From what I know, his father and his family were never enslaved in Kenya, so that's that.

    -NALs

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillbilly View Post
    I do not think they think of him as an African-American, but rather as "one of them"
    HB
    you're a wise man...as for the "education", not one single record from the Columbia "years" in NY...not a word from a former professor, colleague, no-one saying that "we took the same course"...

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    "Change"...just look at the dual citizenship of the new cabinet...

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    It really irritates me how the media, etc. try to categorize Obama as a "African American." He is about as far removed from being an African American as I am - and I am Caucasian and grew up in a small town in Wisconsin. For heaven's sake, he grew up in Hawaii and went to Harvard. I hardly think that he spent his formative years in any way, shape or form, in a cultural/economic setting similar to that of the majority of the black population in the US.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillbilly View Post
    .....Dominicans do not think of themselves as being "black" per se....they recognize color, but their mind set is Spanish or European oriented, not African (except for some folklorists). ....

    HB
    I'm sure you had in mind, among others, Dominican sociologist Dagoberto Tejada. Well, I bumped into him yesterday, here, in the Bella Vista Mall, and to my surprise, he was wearing a calf length multicolored vertically-striped woven poncho, something Rigoberta Menchķ, an ethnic Maya, would wear. Barbarita Bosh mentioned to me recently that Dagoberto, as he ages, is increasingly showing his Taino features. Until now Dagoberto, has invariably dressed in African tribal gowns, bought in NY city.

    JR

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