Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Gold
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    9,419
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Any Canadians going to have a baby here in DR?

    There appears to have been a change of rules about citizenship for Canadians giving birth abroad. I debated putting this in Legal Forum, but it's nothing to do with DR Law albeit of interest to resident Canadians about to produce offspring. Looks like you can pass your citizenship to your children but they might not be able to pass it to theirs if they also give birth outside Canada. Just for anyone who wanted to do some long term planning.

    Expats fear for children's fate under new rules - Investment International

  2. #2
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    12,296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    i read it twice to be sure that i understood it right.
    yeap, sometimes the language makes a bit 'unsure'.
    from my understanding of that article it means that all immigrants to the Canadian country who got citizenship will be such, canadians, and their children will give birth to canadian 'full' citizens, but a Canadian who give's birth to His/Her child abroad(except diplomats and militaries) has to explain his/her child clearly that it can not produce any new blood abroad 'cause that would not get the full canadian citizenship.
    wow,
    i am a imaginary canadian,
    some time in my good canadian citizen tax paying live i decide to spend a time abroad where i meet a lovely women which of course i marry first and then she give's birth to our child, so when that child of our's reaches THAT age i have to take care that there will not be any pregnancy abroad, because the result of such would not be declined a canadian citizen with all those rights aso to live with us in our country of origin???????
    can somebody please explain me where there is some kind of sence of such a law?
    hey,
    i am just a imaginary canadian citizen who 'may' want to live with his own canadian bloodline as canadian citizens on canadian soil as equal canadian citizens.
    weird
    Mike

  3. #3
    Silver
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,864
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I believe this was formerly the case for second generation children when the query was raised at the meeting with the British ambassador some time ago now.

  4. #4
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    25,760
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This was done to prevent Canadians of convenience like the few thousand that the Canadian government had to rescue from Lebanon. You know; come to Canada long enough to get citizenship, go back to home country to make money, have a bunch of kids, trouble happens in home country, use your get out of jail free card, back to Canada with your brood of new Canadians, collect welfare, then things calm down, back to the old country....repeat if necessary.

  5. #5
    Gold
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    9,419
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whirleybird View Post
    I believe this was formerly the case for second generation children when the query was raised at the meeting with the British ambassador some time ago now.
    Looks like it still is, whirleybird. I had never looked into this as I don't have expat UK children but UK Border Authority says 'A child registered as a British citizen under this section will become a British citizen by descent. They will be unable to pass British citizenship on automatically to any of their children born outside the United Kingdom.'
    UK Border Agency | Children born abroad to parents who are British by descent and who have lived in the United Kingdom in the past

    If that website is a bit cumbersome it is explained more simply here:
    CK and Jones UK Visa Information: British Citizenship

    Looks like Canada is just now implementing the same (according to the original article). Mike, it might be worth checking what EU regulations are on this vis-a-vis children of German citizens born abroad when they themselves start having their own children.

    I had always thought that nationality of the parent was the determining factor, not location of birth. I had always quoted the Peter Sellers' phrase 'If the cat has kittens in the oven that doesn't make them biscuits' but seemingly the kittens born to those kittens, if in the oven, WILL be biscuits.

    Doesn't really sit with a globalised society, does it?

  6. #6
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    12,296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bob,
    i see very clear about what prob you are talking about.
    but to prevent such they should take care about to who they give their citizenship when running into their border, but the above provided link tell's such rule for every ever born Candian, and as such i would not agree to it and would name it 'weird'.
    as a side note, i am not canadian and in no way effected by that law/rule/thinking.
    just my outsider 2cents
    Mike

  7. #7
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,216
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Second generation born abroad will be effected by this. An immigrant to Canada, who becomes a citizen has full rights as a citizen born in Canada. Their children born abroad are automatically citizens. That hasn't changed. A Dominican born immigrant to Canada can apply for citizenship become a Canadian and return to the DR to have children with their Dominican spouse. These children born to a citizen are Canadians (1st generation born abroad). It's the grandchildren who are affected.

    Now let's say I lived in the DR and adopted a Dominican child, that child would automatically be a Canadian citizen after meeting all the adoption laws of both countries of course. If that Dominican born adopted child (1st generation born outside of Canada) had a child in the DR, this child (second generation) would not be a Canadian citizen. However the 1st generation born abroad could sponsor them and once they arrive in Canada, they would be able to apply for citizenship immediately.

    I think the second generation born abroad has until April to apply for their proof of citizenship before the new law comes into effect. I actually know someone who is in this situation. I let him know about it a couple weeks ago, I don't know if his daughter will act on it on behalf of her child. By the way, there are plenty of Canadian grandchildren of British subjects that are taking advantage of their ancestry to go and live and work in the UK. My daughter lucked out on that... she gets to be Iranian.

    I just saw Lambada's post now. Yes that's correct.
    Last edited by margaret; 02-06-2009 at 12:36 AM.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •