Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Studying in the DR

    I am going to graduate high school in june and i want to study medicine to become a doctor . i want to know if i can go over there and go to college then Med School and become a doctor then come back to the U.S. and keep my degree (i heard Universities are way cheaper in the DR)

  2. #2
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    925
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    the way it works here you dont have to do 4 years of college then enter med school, itrs about 1 year of college and then 5 years including residency med school
    yes its cheaper here

  3. #3
    Rest in peace Amigo!
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,437
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm not certain of the transferability of a DR trained doctor to the US. Hopefully Hillbilly will comment, otherwise it would be worth your while to send him a PM or e-mail to seek his direction on this matter.

    Gregg

    P.S. - How's your Spanish?

  4. #4
    DR1
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If your serious about med school here, I suggest you take a look at the link below.

    An ebook written by Tim Martinez about studying in the DR. It's very good!

    Dominican Republic Student Guide

  5. #5
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    925
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    too bad you have topay for the info

  6. #6
    Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I just ran into a couple guys who're studying here in Santo Domingo. They're from the US and they're here specifically because it's much cheaper and their work transfers to the US.

    They said they know of two med schools here, one in Spanish the other in English. They said aside from price another positive here is that you get LOT'S of hands on experience.

    They said the hospitals are so understaffed that they were basically thrown right into the ER where every set of clean hands are needed.

  7. #7
    Silver
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default main problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Mason3000 View Post
    I just ran into a couple guys who're studying here in Santo Domingo. They're from the US and they're here specifically because it's much cheaper and their work transfers to the US.

    They said they know of two med schools here, one in Spanish the other in English. They said aside from price another positive here is that you get LOT'S of hands on experience.

    They said the hospitals are so understaffed that they were basically thrown right into the ER where every set of clean hands are needed.

    Your main problem will be passing the certification boards in the US, Before your license to practice is issued. Ask any foreign educated dr. that you know there in the US.

  8. #8
    DR1
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jorgesarduysousa View Post
    too bad you have topay for the info
    Tim spent months of his own time and money compiling the info. Stuff that's not available from any other source, unless you want to spend days and days trudging around the universities here.

    I don't know about you, but if I could spend US$20 to save myself potentially hundreds of dollars and countless wasted hours, I'd be pretty happy

  9. #9
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,417
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lilwill05 View Post
    I am going to graduate high school in june and i want to study medicine to become a doctor . i want to know if i can go over there and go to college then Med School and become a doctor then come back to the U.S. and keep my degree (i heard Universities are way cheaper in the DR)

    Yes you can certainly come to DR to study medicine and ultimately have that DR medical degree recognized in the US but the process is not easy. The first thing you'll need to do is get your High School credential recognized and certified by the 'Secretaria de Estado de Educación (SEE)' in DR. Have a look here: Secretaría de Estado de Educación

    Once your HS Diploma and credential have been certified by SEE, you'll be able to apply for admission to one of a few Universities that offer medical degree in DR (UNIBE, UNPHU, Intec...). After completing a medical degree in DR or any foreign country you'll need to get certified in the US by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG). From what I've heard and read UNIBE seem to be the best at preparing their medical student for the 'United State Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)'. Information on this test and its requirements can be found here: United States Medical Licensing Examination®
    Information on ECFMG requirements can be found at: ECFMG Certification Fact Sheet
    Unibe's website is: UNIBE :: Universidad Iberoamericana

    After you have been certified by ECMFG you can start the laborious process of residency. Be advised that foreign medical graduate usually have difficulty finding a place to do their residency.

    Good luck,
    NotLurking

  10. #10
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,249
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listen. If your scores and credentials are good enough to get you into a decent Medical Program in the States, then you are probably better off doing so. Especially if your plan is to practice medicine in the States.

    I have two cousins that are MDs. One went to school in the states, and the other started med school in cuba, but finished up in the DR. Both are in the states now, but their experiences with the board certifications and obtaining residencies were different. My cousin who studied abroad told me that graduates from US programs definitely had the advantage when applying for residencies.

    I hate to say it, there is a view that's prevalent here in the States. And that view is that US residents go to Med school in the Caribbean because they can't get into a decent program here in the States. An unfortunate and perhaps unfounded opinion. But one that exists nonetheless.

    While you may save money with the cheaper program, you might be setting yourself up for a headache in the future.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •