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  1. #1
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    Default cleaning a worktop

    does anyone know how to clean the horrible stuff thats supposed to resemble marble on kitchen worktops- is there a secret formula apart from a lot of elbow grease ?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrhartley View Post
    does anyone know how to clean the horrible stuff thats supposed to resemble marble on kitchen worktops- is there a secret formula apart from a lot of elbow grease ?
    If you clean it daily it's much easier to maintain. Real marble tains easy so if you have a spill clean immediately. Ivory Liquid dish soap is the best cleaner to use as it leaves no residue, is gentle but still cuts the grease.

  3. #3
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    thank you for your reply - its the reconstituted stuff with a roughish surface so its quite difficult to clean maybe its better to throw away- i tried muriatic acid - even that made no impression

    lemon juice seems to work but i dont have enough lemons this year

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrhartley View Post
    its the reconstituted stuff with a roughish surface
    Are you talking about the laminated stuff that resembles formica? Muriatic acid will most certainly remove the shine from that . Or are you talking about the chipped stone stuff that resembles unpolished granite? I inherited a worktop of the latter in the first house we bought here and changed it immediately because I couldn't distinguish between the black flecks and ants. The laminated tops respond to washing up liquid & water, though, and you can use a gentle scourer, NOT heavy duty wire wool. You could also try using a paste of bicarb of soda with a couple of drops of chloro or alternatively a metal polish which isn't too abrasive.

  5. #5
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    chipped stone

  6. #6
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    In which case disregard my previous advice. I'm not licenced on chipped stone - I got rid of it as soon as I possibly could.

  7. #7
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    I can understand why

  8. #8
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    you need to grind it down with a polidor and then buff it with a different disk to shine. it is similar to terrazo. you can also seal it with a concrete sealer from 8a.

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