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  1. #1
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    Default How do US Citizens living in the DR feel about Health Care Reform in the US

    I have been following the debate on health care reform in the US. It appears that all US Citizens will be forced to enroll into some type of health care plan under the new proposals.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/27/he...3AUCnYTwY1G/ZA

    From that article:

    "Democrats this year would also require individuals to have insurance and would impose financial penalties on those who do not meet the requirement."

    What do those Expats living in the DR think of such a situation where they are forced to pay for insurance they may not be able to use?

  2. #2
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    windeguy, I deleted the duplicate thread as requested.

    To all posters: I hope that this thread will focus on the impact of such a plan on expatriates and not on the pros and cons of the plan in itself, for reasons that should be obvious.

  3. #3
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    Write your Congressman and U.S. Senators and complain about it.

    Nothing much else to do.

  4. #4
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    Default Indeed lets keep this DR related

    What I am interested in discussing is how Expats from the US will feel about being forced to pay for a plan they will have little or no chance to use as I understand it is being proposed.

    I am also interested in finding out what the plans cost would be for one adult and what the penalty would be for not purchasing a plan. I realize it is a bit premature for that information to be available since it is not yet law, but it appears there is an excellent chance this will come to pass and I would like to be prepared.

  5. #5
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    In the UK we have a system called The National Health Service which is funded via National Insurance contributions. It came into effect just after World War II and was designed to ensure that everyone had access to medical care. The payments are made as a form of taxation and it is based on what we call “middle band earnings” This means that those who earn below a certain rate don’t have to pay but get credited as though they have paid and those higher earners only pay up to a certain level of income.
    As an ex-pat having paid for a minimum number of years I can still return to the UK and have medical treatment. You can still take personal insurance cover which would give you faster access to non-urgent medical procedures but you cannot opt out of the national health care service.
    Don’t want to highjack the debate on the US system but thought you might like to know how other countries work it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    What I am interested in discussing is how Expats from the US will feel about being forced to pay for a plan they will have little or no chance to use as I understand it is being proposed.

    I am also interested in finding out what the plans cost would be for one adult and what the penalty would be for not purchasing a plan. I realize it is a bit premature for that information to be available since it is not yet law, but it appears there is an excellent chance this will come to pass and I would like to be prepared.
    Half empty or half full. Don't look at it as people being forced to pay for something they don't need but rather as a solution to a problem that is bankruptying the US treasury and american citizens. 14,000 people lose their health insurance every day, medical bills are the number one reason of bankrupcy in the US so something have got to be done about this issue.

    Also I don't think people living abroad have to pay for it but I'm not sure. If you got more info about it I'd like to see it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Dog View Post
    As an ex-pat having paid for a minimum number of years I can still return to the UK and have medical treatment.
    How long have you been away from UK, Black Dog ? This all changed back in 2004. If you're a UK expat you can get medical treatment but you have to pay for all but emergency treatment. Also for GP visits.

    New NHS restrictions have repercussions for expats - Telegraph

    There's been a huge hubbub about it among S.African expats, court cases, the works. Check the NHS website and you can google search it also.

  8. #8
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    That's very interesting Lambada, I'll pm you so we don't detract from OP's debate

  9. #9
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    We here in the US are having this plan forced down our throats. The bill is so huge that not even the lobbyist have time to read it all. Dems are saying that reform in our health care is needed to lower costs. My thougts are that a great place to start is to not look at just insurance companies but to look at the medical industry as a whole. Doctors, nurses, drug manufactures, etc. all are very high incomes. Plus we are expected to pay for insurance for all the illegall aliens in this country. There are too many other things to correct before we (and our future generations) are forced to pay for this as well as the bail outs.

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    Although I'm not from the US I have been watching the debates etc on TV and I had dinner on Sat with a doctor who is one of the president's advisors on the reform project. So, I have a question if I may
    Is the need for change a) to reduce costs or b) to provide access to healthcare for ALL US citizens or would the answer just depend on your political viewpoint?

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