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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by gringobizadvisors View Post
    But that's not the case Chip. I.e. when you live in SDO -- No problem. But our weekend place is in Cabrera where the grid power is extra disgusting. Sometime the 110 rolls in at a screaming 89 for the first hour, and the VR needs to close the circuit. It simply cannot boost from 89 to 110.
    I live in Santiago and the voltage would drop in the lows 80's at night in my neighborhood and the voltage regulator converted two 80 volt lines into a usable 110. There is no "boosting" going on but in fact a reduction of voltage from 160 total to 110.

    Voltage Series

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    I live in Santiago and the voltage would drop in the lows 80's at night in my neighborhood and the voltage regulator converted two 80 volt lines into a usable 110. There is no "boosting" going on but in fact a reduction of voltage from 160 total to 110.

    Voltage Series
    It's apparent that the wiring is different in each of our cases. I don't need a link on Voltage Series. Maybe you can come up and help me then?

  3. #63
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    I just checked the water in my batteries and after a year they still haven't needed any water. Truth be told, since they put the "triple" in we don't have consistent outages. That being said, I probably don't neeed 8 batteries but it's nice to know if we have a storm that we can probably go two to three days on the inverter by phasing the fridge and conservation.

    Also, with regard to poor power supply, if you get really low voltage if it turns out that it is because of inferior wiring in your neighborhood, it really can payoff to getting the power company to resolve this, either by way of a "cuņa" or by involvement of the junta de vecinos. In our case, we did both; I have a friend who is a supervisor with Edenoirte of our area and after complaining to him for some time and the junta de vecinos meeting with the engineers at the local Edenorte office they finally upgraded our system.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    I bought my inverter from a different company; an engineer here in Santiago. I think what Robert got was an excellent deal and would recommend it from what I have seen so far.

    As far as the voltage regulator I bought it from the same engineer but unfortunately don't know what they go for stateside.
    Chip, we spoke to your guy at length. He makes his smaller inverters, but buys the larger ones from someone else. We chose to go with the manufacturer for the reasons I stated before, but definitely would have used him.

    We spoke with Inverluz this morning. Some additional details we found:

    1) Their Wave inverters have an auto equilzation function. It does a 4-hour cycle every 6 months. They also have a manual equalization cycle. I'll do a cycle every 6 weeks or so.

    2) They make both line voltage regulators (street to house) in both 110 and 220. The prices: 110/5kw $RD6500, 110/10kw $RD9200, 220/7.5kw $RD7500. I see a 220/7.5kw in our future because the a/c runs on 220.

    3) They make post-inverters line conditioners. I didn't get a price.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    I live in Santiago and the voltage would drop in the lows 80's at night in my neighborhood and the voltage regulator converted two 80 volt lines into a usable 110. There is no "boosting" going on but in fact a reduction of voltage from 160 total to 110.

    Voltage Series
    So if I have a 220 a/c, I'd need 3 wires in to insure a step-down to consistent 220...and 110?

  6. #66
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    A note on battery equalization:

    After a EQ cycle, make sure to check the battery fluid level. EQ "boils" the acid and can lose enough water vapor in a normal deep cycle lead acid battery to possibly uncover the top of the plates.

    Low fluid will kill a battery very quickly. It's prolly the #1 cause of battery death in marine deep cycle applications. I would imagine that holds true in inverter applications also.

  7. #67
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    I just got a similar response from the regional sales manager for US batteries:

    [FONT=Arial]Knowing the DR anything is possible....
    Regarding your question it looks like a US1800 that we do manufacturer....
    You can verify that it is US Battery by the build codes that are on the battery but unfortunately not in the picture.. [the label picture CB posted]
    We do private label batteries for large customers and as I explained that appears to be the case..
    Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns...
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial]

    ... J-D.


    [/FONT]

  8. #68
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    I just spoke with Fred Wehmeyer a tech rep for US Battery in Augusta where the batteries in question were manufactured.

    Looks like even folks within the company are a little confused.

    The stampings on the positive terminal are date of manufacture and type (6v). My stamp is 9GY, meaning a 6v made on June '09.

    The case stamping is also an identifier. Mine are stamped 1A174D. It shows place (A is Augusta GA), date and shift of manufacture.

    He is 90% sure it is a 2200 because he is unaware of even large lots changing the case cover colors since they also use that as identifiers. Mine are red and the 2200 is red.

    I sent him the pic of the batteries. He committed to getting back to me with definitive information.

    It really doesn't make a huge difference to me which is which. If what stated above is accurate, maybe the 1800 is the best for the conditions here.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    I guess I could have asked the question better as in: How many batteries would you have in your battery bank to get optimum efficiency out of your 5K inverter.

    It would seem that most inverters (especially the size you mention) work off 24Volts. It takes four 6Volt batteries in series to deliver 24V.

    Four 6V/220Ah used to 80% max equal about four times 6xbatteries have a theoretical rated power capacity of about 4200 Watts or 4.2Kw total power available over time. IF you'd use the full 5KW(h) capacity of a 5KWh inverter, you would use up your 4.2 available from the four batteries in 50 minutes or less (losses from the inverter not yet accounted for, spikes from starting appliances, etc) IN THEORY!! Theory, because deep cycle batteries, as discussed earlier, are not designed to output all their energy available in short time periods.
    So, to service a 5KW(H) need you would, for the sake of time of power available and longevity of your batteries want to at least double, of have more multiple or FOUR battery banks hooked up; 8, 12; 16 in parallel.

    However, the person who buys a 5KW rig may not be the one who is using a constant 4 to 5 KWh! But wants to have an inverter who is sized so it can safely handle the spikes produced by stacks of simultaneously starting appliances (usage spikes/surge) without overtaxing the inverter.
    Yet again, it's not just the inverter who has to be able to handle these demand surges but the batteries too.

    Most serious manufacturers of quality OEM deep cyle batteries publish charts which show how much power (in Amperes or AH) they can deliver over different amounts of times (like "constant" or short spikes) without damage or falling short of being able to service those needs.

    ... J-D.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    So if I have a 220 a/c, I'd need 3 wires in to insure a step-down to consistent 220...and 110?
    That would seem to make sense as having three wires would mean you would have a probable min voltage of 240. Also, my regulator only reduces the 220 to 110 but it would make sense that there should be regulators/reducers to do what you need. If you can't find one I'm sure the guy I referenced you can build one relatively economically for you.

    The only issue I see is finding three 110 volt lines as from what I have seen the transformers only supply two. More than likely you would have to pull from two separate transformers, which might not even be possible or pull from the higher voltage before the transformer if that is even possible.

    It would seem to me that there must already be a solution for this issue so maybe another call to my friend or the place you bought the inverter from may be a good idea.

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