Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Dominican Music

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Dominican Music

    My wife and I visited Puerto Plata and Cabarete in January of 2007. Everywhere we went, we seemed to hear the same songs playing in the same order. Was (is) there some sort of CD that would have been out that everyone would have been playing? It seemed to be many different artists, I know this isn't very descriptive, but does anyone know what that might have been? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Perhaps

    Same songs, same order? It appears logical that it was a popular CD being played. After all, what are the odds of the same songs being played in the same exact order every time you heard it? Regards!

  3. #3
    Silver
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,377
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Not really - but it seems that way.
    To the untrained ear the plinky-plonky Bachata all sounds the same so one could get the impression that there is one universal CD that everybody plays.
    There are virtually as many illegal compilation CDs as there are songs. Rarely do I see original CDs of Dominican artists - they make their cash through live performances.
    I love some Bachata - For me Frank Reyes is a hell of a singer and Zacharia Ferreir(SP?) is also kind of special. These are love songs mainly and keep to simple chord progressions and remain largely diatonic. Not very challenging, for the most part.
    Meringue is everywhere and tends to be more upbeat. It ranges from the old to the new. Some of the newer electronic Meringue can be as leftfield as any techno from the 90's while the older stuff has some of the most amazing brass section work. I sometimes wonder if the sax players realise that what they do is virtually impossible. Dominican trumpet players regard playing all night sticking everything up the octave and tonguing as fast as hell as normal. These guys are so far ahead of European / North American players that I was truly shocked when I first heard them play. Subtle it is not but stunning it very much is.

    There is obviously a tradition of Salsa in the D.R. Although the happy sounding Puerto Rican Salsistas get most of the airplay you hear a lot of the more moody Cuban Salsa (Sol?). My all time favourite Dominican musical artist is Salsista Raulin Rosendo - strangely you will very rarely find a guy selling CDs with his material in spite of the fact that everybody knows him and loves his music. Very odd - this dude is a national treasure.

    One of the special things about Dominican listening tastes is that parents will largely listen to the same music as their kids. This cross generational taste helps keep music universal.
    Dominican youth, as is their artistic duty, are still trying to **** their parents off with new music like Reggeaton and the more way out Meringue, but the beats are traditional yet fresh and you will find old guys tapping their foot to the new stuff.

    In relation to your question, when a great song is released it will never go totally out of fashion. 'Princessa' by Frank Reyes, for example, was massive when I first came here. I still hear it a lot. I bet it will be popular years from now. So you tend to hear the classics over and over again possibly creating your impression of the single CD you mention.

    Be warned - occasionally Bachata can overload the brain. On a 7 hour guagua journey earlier this year I was ready to maim after being constantly hammered by loud Bachata.
    This can be an issue because Dominicans have a habit of turning up whatever sound system until the point of distortion - then giving it an extra tweak just to make sure they are creating as much row as humanly possible. This is bloody annoying and can ruin otherwise great music.

    Ironically, I have heard some trucks with excellent quality > 30k rigs on the back driving down the street at walking pace advertising parties.
    As a guy who used to frequent the free party scene in the U.K. in the 90's, I can say that Dominicans have some truly stunning sound systems compared to what we used to put together. I wish we had these in the old rave days. I still have fond memories of running through muddy fields in Wales carrying hot amplifiers, avoiding the local constabulary.

    Anyway, you asked an innocent question and got all this. I know,I should get out more.

  4. #4
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    851
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pckhalil View Post
    My wife and I visited Puerto Plata and Cabarete in January of 2007. Everywhere we went, we seemed to hear the same songs playing in the same order. Was (is) there some sort of CD that would have been out that everyone would have been playing? It seemed to be many different artists, I know this isn't very descriptive, but does anyone know what that might have been? Thanks!
    Try this website.........ENLADISCO.COM Escuchar musica en linea gratis

    and you will probably find the music that was being played in the DR!

  5. #5
    I love AZB!
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pedrochemical View Post
    Not really - but it seems that way.
    To the untrained ear the plinky-plonky Bachata all sounds the same so one could get the impression that there is one universal CD that everybody plays.
    There are virtually as many illegal compilation CDs as there are songs. Rarely do I see original CDs of Dominican artists - they make their cash through live performances.
    I love some Bachata - For me Frank Reyes is a hell of a singer and Zacharia Ferreir(SP?) is also kind of special. These are love songs mainly and keep to simple chord progressions and remain largely diatonic. Not very challenging, for the most part.
    Meringue is everywhere and tends to be more upbeat. It ranges from the old to the new. Some of the newer electronic Meringue can be as leftfield as any techno from the 90's while the older stuff has some of the most amazing brass section work. I sometimes wonder if the sax players realise that what they do is virtually impossible. Dominican trumpet players regard playing all night sticking everything up the octave and tonguing as fast as hell as normal. These guys are so far ahead of European / North American players that I was truly shocked when I first heard them play. Subtle it is not but stunning it very much is.

    There is obviously a tradition of Salsa in the D.R. Although the happy sounding Puerto Rican Salsistas get most of the airplay you hear a lot of the more moody Cuban Salsa (Sol?). My all time favourite Dominican musical artist is Salsista Raulin Rosendo - strangely you will very rarely find a guy selling CDs with his material in spite of the fact that everybody knows him and loves his music. Very odd - this dude is a national treasure.

    One of the special things about Dominican listening tastes is that parents will largely listen to the same music as their kids. This cross generational taste helps keep music universal.
    Dominican youth, as is their artistic duty, are still trying to **** their parents off with new music like Reggeaton and the more way out Meringue, but the beats are traditional yet fresh and you will find old guys tapping their foot to the new stuff.

    In relation to your question, when a great song is released it will never go totally out of fashion. 'Princessa' by Frank Reyes, for example, was massive when I first came here. I still hear it a lot. I bet it will be popular years from now. So you tend to hear the classics over and over again possibly creating your impression of the single CD you mention.

    Be warned - occasionally Bachata can overload the brain. On a 7 hour guagua journey earlier this year I was ready to maim after being constantly hammered by loud Bachata.
    This can be an issue because Dominicans have a habit of turning up whatever sound system until the point of distortion - then giving it an extra tweak just to make sure they are creating as much row as humanly possible. This is bloody annoying and can ruin otherwise great music.

    Ironically, I have heard some trucks with excellent quality > 30k rigs on the back driving down the street at walking pace advertising parties.
    As a guy who used to frequent the free party scene in the U.K. in the 90's, I can say that Dominicans have some truly stunning sound systems compared to what we used to put together. I wish we had these in the old rave days. I still have fond memories of running through muddy fields in Wales carrying hot amplifiers, avoiding the local constabulary.

    Anyway, you asked an innocent question and got all this. I know,I should get out more.
    Good post Pedro, unusual to see a British subdict in love with Dominican music.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •