Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: How to know if your DR home or Building can withstand a quake

  1. #1
    On Vacation!
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default How to know if your DR home or Building can withstand a quake

    Can some of the construction gurus weigh in on this pressing topic? Are there things to look for in advance in terms of proper reinforcement, support etc. How to spot potential "stress" or "weak" areas in the structure...

  2. #2
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,944
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    yes. don't live in an apartment building with parking below it. during a quake the building can shear, which means rock side to side, causing the building to collapse on the parking structure.

    unfortunately there are a lot of torres here like this.

  3. #3
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    24,911
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    When my wife built her school everyone told her she was wasting money with all that extra rebar. The whole town will fall down and her school will still be standing.

  4. #4
    Silver
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,759
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Generally I see enough rebar being used. In general newer concrete (CBS concrete pillar & beams reinforced, concrete roof homes) could be quite solidly built. Given the magnitude of the POP 09-2003 quake, the damage was relatively low.

    • HOWEVER, when building, you will find the plumber using space supposedly assigned for pillars to organize his pipes up and down... reason; the engineers say they are NOT plumbers... JUST engineers... well, BAD engineers, homes DO COME with pipes after all. So, you may have some "supporting" pillars filled with... plastic pipes, some rebar and a little concrete.
    • I have seen builders use beach sand! It contains SALT which will kill the rebar in a few years and produce a substandard concrete!
    • Humidity problems (usually from the ground as builders and even engineers absolutely REFUSE to recognize the need of proper humidity barriers) will rot cinder blocks and eventually even poured concrete.
    • Gas lines running THRU the walls are a further risk. In Spain (which has limited seismic activity) gas lines have by CODE to be run ALONG the EXTERIOR of walls, so, if they break, it can be seen and the gas is most likely to escape to the outside. Not the case here. Movement in the walls can sheer of pipes and the problem can appear only hours or even days later.


    These are just some of the major points to keep in mind.

    ... J-D.

  5. #5
    Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There was an extensive study done after the 2003 earthquake and I wish I could find it now. It explained why some buildings had more damage than others.

    - Maryanne

  6. #6
    Silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,472
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just being logical, if your house is more than 7 years old then its already withstood a couple quakes.

    Yesterdays, and the one from 2003.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listen, man, nothing here can withstand an earthquake. Nothing. Especially not a 7.3. Who cares about rebar if the ground moves? Remember liquefaction. Multistory houses will fall because of gravity and the concrete will pulverize. Rebar will keep the pillars in place but what about the roof?
    The real problem is there are no uniform building codes for such an event. The buildings now are Miami hurricane engineered(all concrete and cinder block). Not San Francisco or Tokyo engineered.
    And dont forget one more important factor, who is building the house? If you use the cheapeast labor, the cheapest materials and the cheapest decorator what would you expect?

  8. #8
    Silver
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,759
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
    Listen, man, nothing here can withstand an earthquake. Nothing. Especially not a 7.3. Who cares about rebar if the ground moves? Remember liquefaction. Multistory houses will fall because of gravity and the concrete will pulverize. Rebar will keep the pillars in place but what about the roof?
    The real problem is there are no uniform building codes for such an event. The buildings now are Miami hurricane engineered(all concrete and cinder block). Not San Francisco or Tokyo engineered.
    And dont forget one more important factor, who is building the house? If you use the cheapeast labor, the cheapest materials and the cheapest decorator what would you expect?
    The DR had a tradition of building CBS homes long before it gradually became code in Dade, Broward and then Palm Beach county subsequently.
    Actually, the "real" homes built here are structurally far superior to SE Floridian homes as "we" here use footer foundations (vs. just a slab in many comparable single family home SE FL applications), "we" have a framework of poured concrete pillars and beam girts, solid supporting inner walls and a poured concrete roof. It's simple not comparable and neither are the issues or adverse elements except for storms and flooding.
    Believe it or not, THERE ARE building codes in place here and to my own surprise, I may say that in general they are being followed... not to the letter but to the principle. Just check the building technology being taught to aspiring architects and civil engineers at local universities.
    But yes, you are obviously right, there is nothing which will withstand an earthquake to no limit, even if one has an expensive decorator .


    ... J-D.

  9. #9
    Gold
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    9,445
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
    Listen, man, nothing here can withstand an earthquake. Nothing.
    RacerX, all our home in PP had in the 2003 quake of 6.5 magnitude was plaster cracks & a few garden ceramic tiles cracked, nothing structural. Many homes survived the 2003 quake just fine. Not sure how a 7.0 would impact but if you have sufficient steel bars I wouldn't expect total destruction. Admittedly the 2003 quake epicentre wasn't as shallow as yesterday's - the shallower the more likely structural damage.

  10. #10
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    925
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree to J D, building structures [excluding anything built by the government or "cheap" engineer's who just cut corners to fill their pockets} are way superior to states code

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •