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  1. #1
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    Default self leveling compound?

    can anyone tell me how or what I would ask for for a SLF over here, can't find anyone in my local area who knows my needs, best I'm getting is a sloppy cement mix (not good enough).
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNED View Post
    can anyone tell me how or what I would ask for for a SLF over here, can't find anyone in my local area who knows my needs, best I'm getting is a sloppy cement mix (not good enough).
    Thanks!

    The Spanish (Spain) term is Mortero/Hormigón Auto-Nivelante.

    Never seen it being used or offered here, but then I don't see it all.
    A "sloppy" cement mix will not be level. As you will know, SLU (Self Leveling Underlayment) is like water when mixed and then sets very quickly.

    I got my professional grade, automatic rotating laser level HERE (POP).


    ... J-D.

  3. #3
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    Nivelador Acrílico base Concreto, I researched in Google in Spanish, this should be the right translation for what you are looking for.
    I had a hard time a few month ago looking for valve grinding compound (Pasta de esmerilaje para valvulas) went to different auto parts stores and I was lucky to find a Dominican guy who understood my needs.
    That is the problem when I do mechanic work here, I don't know the name of of all the parts & the tools in English.

    JJ

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDJones View Post
    Not only that, but a sloppy mix will greatly reduce the strength of the cement mixture.

    Cement has to be mixed at the correct mixture to maximize it's strength.

    Obviously true.

    Anyways, I don't know what the OP's project is, but if you are on the North Coast and it'd be helpful, I'll gladly help with my laser level and show you how to pour a level floor or slab using concrete.

    ... J-D.

  5. #5
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    Thankyou everyone, my problem is trying to level the floor without raising the floor (obviously within reason). I have decided to tile myself as the workers made a right a$$ of the passageway. So the kitchen level needs to be the same as the passageway but it slopes and dips all over the place. With an SLC I could leave just enough to get my tiles down and keep the same level right through. SO you see my problem with laying a new slab, I can't go higher. I really don't want to chop away the existing slab as I can see that turning into a never ending story.

    Thanks again, but still no sign of a Leveling compound anywhere. Any other ideas appreciated.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the offer J-D but I'm in the big smoke.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNED View Post
    Thankyou everyone, my problem is trying to level the floor without raising the floor (obviously within reason). I have decided to tile myself as the workers made a right a$$ of the passageway. So the kitchen level needs to be the same as the passageway but it slopes and dips all over the place. With an SLC I could leave just enough to get my tiles down and keep the same level right through. SO you see my problem with laying a new slab, I can't go higher. I really don't want to chop away the existing slab as I can see that turning into a never ending story.

    Thanks again, but still no sign of a Leveling compound anywhere. Any other ideas appreciated.
    Get a decent tile layer to do the work for you. It shouldn't be hard - there are a lot of good ones around. Let me know if you need someone.

  8. #8
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    Very quick lesson I received is that leave a Dominican to do a job for you and they will probably (hopefully) do a good job for you, BUT, even if they don't know how to do something then they will still take it on as if it is second nature and learn on the job, at my expense unfortunately.
    I'd rather do it myself and have it done properly, even if it does take a long time. Thanks anyway.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNED View Post
    Very quick lesson I received is that leave a Dominican to do a job for you and they will probably (hopefully) do a good job for you, BUT, even if they don't know how to do something then they will still take it on as if it is second nature and learn on the job, at my expense unfortunately.
    I'd rather do it myself and have it done properly, even if it does take a long time. Thanks anyway.
    That's why you make sure they have good references - that way no guessing is needed. Good luck.

  10. #10
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    Are you connected within the building trade here?

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