‘10 alternatives to the typical De nada....You’re welcome in Spanish’

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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I just discovered this You Tuber and he has some awesome videos about the Spanish language.


I like these alternatives to de nada that he presented. There are a few that I have not heard but I am familiar with the majority. His examples are excellent. ¡Un gran video!






-MP.
 

NY2STI

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2020
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One that he missed is A la orden.

So THAT'S what it means. The nurse at my dentist's office in Santiago used it in a text message and it confused me. Google translates it as "to the order" which confused me more. I just responded "okay" and let it go. Full disclosure: my Spanish is intermediate. I have another friend in Santiago who always says POR nada.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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So THAT'S what it means. The nurse at my dentist's office in Santiago used it in a text message and it confused me. Google translates it as "to the order" which confused me more. I just responded "okay" and let it go. Full disclosure: my Spanish is intermediate. I have another friend in Santiago who always says POR nada.

It’s more on the formal side. It is understood as at your service or anything we can help you with we are here to serve you. Along those lines.
 
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Chirimoya

Moderator - East Coast & Headline News
Dec 9, 2002
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Yes, which is very common in South America but is it common in Spain?

I use it a lot because I am often in formal scenarios. Siempre a la orden.
I'd never heard it until I crossed the pond, but that's not to say it doesn't exist in Spain. My guess is it has fallen out of use because it's more formal.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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I'd never heard it until I crossed the pond, but that's not to say it doesn't exist in Spain. My guess is it has fallen out of use because it's more formal.

Could be but I truly associate the phrase with Latin American Spanish and as I mentioned previously especially South America. Many countries still have a lot formality and this is just one of the many ways you see it come across in language. I like to mirror my speech and I pick up on it right away. I am normally polite and ramp it up when interacting with certain individuals and especially knowing what country they come from all the more polite I get. It just makes the interaction so much better.
 
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Chirimoya

Moderator - East Coast & Headline News
Dec 9, 2002
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So THAT'S what it means. The nurse at my dentist's office in Santiago used it in a text message and it confused me. Google translates it as "to the order" which confused me more. I just responded "okay" and let it go. Full disclosure: my Spanish is intermediate. I have another friend in Santiago who always says POR nada.
Another reason not to use online translators.
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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So THAT'S what it means. The nurse at my dentist's office in Santiago used it in a text message and it confused me. Google translates it as "to the order" which confused me more. I just responded "okay" and let it go. Full disclosure: my Spanish is intermediate. I have another friend in Santiago who always says POR nada.

Reguarly used within the service industries.
Do you not dine out or frequent hotels much?
An employee of a restaurant or hotel that does not respond in kind to a client will be reprimanded almost immediately.
 
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NY2STI

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Mar 22, 2020
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Reguarly used within the service industries.
Do you not dine out or frequent hotels much?
An employee of a restaurant or hotel that does not respond in kind to a client will be reprimanded almost immediately.
Can't recall hearing it at either place, although I do have selective hearing. Selective vision as well.
 

JD Jones

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Jan 7, 2016
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I've always used "El placer es mio" (The pleasure is mine).
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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OK, so what's the diff between placer and gusto?
In the context discussed there is no difference as far as I know. Others may opine.

I occasionally say: es un placer, un placer, ha sido un placer, (con) mucho gusto but all are very formal. In the day to day interaction I just say de nada or no hay problema.
 
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bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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I hear A sus órdenes from our receptionist all the time when she is finished dealing with a client. I know it isnt quite the same, but it is used the same as de nada.
 

drstock

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Oct 29, 2010
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I suppose some of these aren't used here in the DR, as the presenter is using the "os" and "vosotros" forms.

My favourite that I have heard here is simply "siempre", which I think shows positive emotions.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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I've always used "El placer es mio" (The pleasure is mine).

I have been trying to find something in writing with regards to your post because when you wrote it my first reaction was no that does not sound correct in a scenario where you are saying you’re welcome in response to gracias.


El placer es mío is
actually not correct when responding to gracias.

Have a look here. I like these options:




-MP.
 
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