‘10 alternatives to the typical De nada....You’re welcome in Spanish’

Marianopolita

Well-known member
Dec 26, 2003
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Time to switch to "un placer" :)

Yes, that is much better. It was bothering me ever since you posted it but I wanted to respond with back up.

Another one that is heard specifically in the service industry is felizmente. For example, after buying something in a store, coffee shop, bakery etc. when you receive your product and say gracias the response may be felizmente.
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Yes, that is much better. It was bothering me ever since you posted it but I wanted to respond with back up.

Another one that is heard specifically in the service industry is felizmente. For example, after buying something in a store, coffee shop, bakery etc. when you receive your product and say gracias the response may be felizmente.

Do you believe this to be generational in nature?
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Do you believe this to be generational in nature?

Can you expand a bit more please? Are you referring to the actual word felizmente or even the fact that people say you’re welcome?

Compared to English in my observation it varies by country, region, culture, and by individual. The various forms of you’re welcome in English are very informal. It has come down responses such as no problem (which is old but very common) no worries, and very often no response at all and that would be an example of it being generational in nature.
 
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Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Can you expand a bit more please? Are you referring to the actual word felizmente or even the fact that people say you’re welcome?

Compared to English in my observation it varies by country, region, culture, and by individual. The various forms of you’re welcome in English are very informal. It has come down responses such as no problem (which is old but very common) no worries, and very often no response at all and that would be an example of it being generational in nature.

Yes, I was actually referring to the word felizmente, and it's current usage.
The sad state of affairs regarding traditional courtesies in modern global society is more than troublesome as well. I have experienced the "no response at all" in various global corners, and I will keep repeating my end of the courtesy until the message is received, and a proper response is reciprocated.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Yes, I was actually referring to the word felizmente, and it's current usage.
The sad state of affairs regarding traditional courtesies in modern global society is more than troublesome as well. I have experienced the "no response at all" in various global corners, and I will keep repeating my end of the courtesy until the message is received, and a proper response is reciprocated.

I still hear felizmente a lot and predominantly from people of one Latin country. Levels of courtesy and the expected social norms and niceties varies quite a bit. In general, without singling out any country, I find South America especially the Northern countries still have a noticeable level of social courtesy or the expectation compared to the very relaxed and to a certain extent very informal Caribbean Antilles.

People’s mannerisms align with their culture and upbringing. Courtesy and politeness are highly valued in Latin culture and the Spanish language has ample variations and options to convey politeness. Even when you want say no without sounding impolite there are ways. English unfortunately is not a model anymore because it’s a lingua franca and it so disappointing to hear how the language is spoken by many whose first language is not English. What was once respected has now been lost.

Regarding the no response to a thank you or gracias I don’t let it bother me. I just make a mental note and it shows that person’s incultura aka falta de educación.
 
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NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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I still hear felizmente a lot and predominantly from people of one Latin country. Levels of courtesy and the expected social norms and niceties varies quite a bit. In general, without singling out any country, I find South America especially the Northern countries still have a noticeable level of social courtesy or the expectation thereof compared to the very relaxed and to a certain extent very informal Caribbean Antilles.

People’s mannerisms align with their culture and upbringing. Courtesy and politeness are highly valued in Latin culture and the Spanish language has ample variations and options to convey politeness. Even when you want say no without sounding impolite there are ways. English unfortunately is not a model anymore because it’s a lingua franca and it so disappointing to hear how the language is spoken by many whose first language is not English. What was once respected has now been lost.

Regarding the no response to a thank you or gracias I don’t let it bother me. I just make a mental note and it shows that person’s incultura aka falta de educación.

In my guagua experience, I rarely hear thanks to the driver or conductor. But when I say gracias, I always get a de nada or something like felizmente (which I wouldn't understand until now). When shopping, at either the big stores or the market, my experience is the same.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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In my guagua experience, I rarely hear thanks to the driver or conductor. But when I say gracias, I always get a de nada or something like felizmente (which I wouldn't understand until now). When shopping, at either the big stores or the market, my experience is the same.

The driver was probably shocked when you said gracias. Unfortunately, lack of manners has become so common place and accepted. I can’t stand it. Please and thank you are a must. Even saying goodbye after a phone conversation is seldom. The conversation is over when you no longer hear the person on the other end. Not my style. I will never conform.
 

Marianopolita

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I like these two.

I have watched many videos from this duo about different grammar topics. The lady (I don’t know her name) is quite knowledgeable about Spanish.

They offer quite a few alternatives to de nada. Some are common and others are really not heard at all. Maybe they are regional. The last option made me laugh ;). I will not hold my breath waiting to hear that reply.
 
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Lucifer

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Jun 26, 2012
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A month late, but oh-so-timely:

Instead of replying with “De nada” or “A la orden”, you may say, “We’re out of cheese; there’s only potatoes.”

Looky here:

46: Gracias por tu voto, Lucifer.

Me: No hay de que...so; nomás de papa.
(Not ‘no más’, but ‘nomás’)