7 Interesting Dominican Slang Words....

mexi

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Dec 9, 2014
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Love this blog and how it explains those 7 slang along with the YouTube video and how to use them lol...
We need some more of these, because, I have been going to DR for 10 yrs and I still don't understand when
they speak!!! Even though my Spanish is decent.. Do you guys have any other DR slang words you can tell me about?

This is the post that explains them:

https://www.grittyspanish.com/2017/01/01/7-dominican-slang-words-and-phrases-to-know/


And this is the video:

[video=youtube;TDkwYGwrHmQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDkwYGwrHmQ[/video]
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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The video is very Dominican sounding not only the slang but also the speech patterns. At least it gives examples of a Dominican speaker. This is not only an example of slang but also colloquial speech. If you are interested in learning slang there is not a shortage of info on the web. You just need to have the time to search.

Although these examples are quite local some slang words and expressions are are used in several Spanish-speaking countries or in a region.


In this clip I was not familiar with mangue and divariando. In general, even if you have not heard the word or expression one can understand but sometimes it’s completely foreign.

I don’t try to learn it per se. You can pick it up as you speak the language and interact in Spanish. Yes, there will be times where you will have no clue what’s being said but just ask for a clarification.

Bacano- used in other countries as well with the same meaning
Jevi- mainly in the Caribbean
Pap?- meaning dude- in other countries as well
Estar en olla- broke. Estar en la fu?cata is another expression with same meaning but very Cuban.




-MP.
 

mexi

New member
Dec 9, 2014
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The video is very Dominican sounding not only the slang but also the speech patterns. At least it gives examples of a Dominican speaker. This is not only an example of slang but also colloquial speech. If you are interested in learning slang there is not a shortage of info on the web. You just need to have the time to search.

Although these examples are quite local some slang words and expressions are are used in several Spanish-speaking countries or in a region.


In this clip I was not familiar with mangue and divariando. In general, even if you have not heard the word or expression one can understand but sometimes it?s completely foreign.

I don?t try to learn it per se. You can pick it up as you speak the language and interact in Spanish. Yes, there will be times where you will have no clue what?s being said but just ask for a clarification.

Bacano- used in other countries as well with the same meaning
Jevi- mainly in the Caribbean
Pap?- meaning dude- in other countries as well
Estar en olla- broke. Estar en la fu?cata is another expression with same meaning but very Cuban.




-MP.

Thanks a lot, when Dominicans speak, I wish there were subtitles under their chins!
 

mexi

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Dec 9, 2014
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My Spanish is okay, but after listening a few times, by rewinding the video, I was able to understand it well... With me, once I know what's being said, it makes it a lot easier to go back and listen. I see a lot of youtube videos with Dominicans people talking, but it's rare they have what they are saying in English and Spanish..... sigh, this is what makes mastering Spanish so difficult....

but I can hold my own once I am in control of the convo..
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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My Spanish is okay, but after listening a few times, by rewinding the video, I was able to understand it well... With me, once I know what's being said, it makes it a lot easier to go back and listen. I see a lot of youtube videos with Dominicans people talking, but it's rare they have what they are saying in English and Spanish..... sigh, this is what makes mastering Spanish so difficult....

but I can hold my own once I am in control of the convo..

I listened to the video again and I guess depending on one’s level it could be considered fast. However, this is normal Dominican speech. You will hear much faster Spanish than this both in the DR and in the Spanish-speaking word. Therefore, my suggestion is to just keep trying to get as much exposure as you can to the spoken language.

Are you focusing only on Spanish spoken the Dominican Republic? The reason why I ask is I think you will benefit from hearing Spanish from anywhere in the Spanish-speaking world and all speeds. If you limit yourself, it could be harder or even discouraging. I will tell you some of the fastest sounding Spanish you will hear from Puerto Rican, Dominican and Cuban speakers. I actually think Cubans speak faster than Dominicans and some of their speech patterns have more complexities thus making Cubans harder to understand.

As well, keep in mind you have given yourself a hard challenge. The video you posted is good. Too bad it does not have more examples but you are attempting to understand local slang and colloquial speech. That is not easy if you are still learning Spanish. The video is an example of Spanish in the DR that is of the street or de la calle so if you don’t understand all of it or you have to listen to it several times, it is not unusual. Sounds like you need to practice speaking Spanish daily to train your ear some more but don’t be discouraged.



-MP.
 

amp

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Oct 5, 2010
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Another word I heard a little while ago ...

Whatsappiando: using WhatsApp
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Mafiosismo, I heard this one at the car-washes, RSJ



In what context because this word has been around for ages? I heard it growing up in my youth with a clear understanding of the meaning. It refers to an operation with extreme corruption, dishonesty, absolute power, control and underhandedness.

I remember clearly my parents saying eso es mafiosismo. In this context it is not slang.


-MP.
 

dulce

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Jan 1, 2002
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What does the slang term chavi mean? I have a friends who's nickname is Chavi.
 

TropicalPaul

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Sep 3, 2013
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The one that other Spanish speakers keep commenting on to me is "llamame pa'tra" for "call me back". Most Dominicans tend to use this, but it doesn't make any sense in Spanish. Basically they have taken the English "back" and translated it into Spanish literally and then tacked it onto Call Me, but it's totally wrong.

The other one I love is a chapiadora (lawnmower) for a girl who's a gold-digger.
 

mexi

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Dec 9, 2014
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The one that other Spanish speakers keep commenting on to me is "llamame pa'tra" for "call me back". Most Dominicans tend to use this, but it doesn't make any sense in Spanish. Basically they have taken the English "back" and translated it into Spanish literally and then tacked it onto Call Me, but it's totally wrong.

The other one I love is a chapiadora (lawnmower) for a girl who's a gold-digger.
I love the "Llamame Pa'tra".... Chapiadora, I haven't heard that one lol..
 

mexi

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Dec 9, 2014
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I listened to the video again and I guess depending on one’s level it could be considered fast. However, this is normal Dominican speech. You will hear much faster Spanish than this both in the DR and in the Spanish-speaking word.
-MP.
Yes!!!! totally agree, this is very slow in comparison I think, although I had to listen to it a few times before it started to sound somewhat "Normal" and make sense...

And I am opened to learning Spanish from everywhere, I just find Slang fascinating and it think it's important to be aware of them. Every bit of Spanish I listened to has helped me overall, not just "Dominican Spanish". When I am in Mexico, for an example and I speak to them, when I come to RD, I am better overall.