781 people removed, savings of more than RD$200 million a month at Ministry of Foreign Relations

Dolores

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The Ministry of Foreign Relations (Mirex) announces savings of around RD$2.6 billion a year with the cancellation of 781 people who did not comply with the requirements to work in the Dominican foreign service. The savings are around RD$222.6 million a month.



Deputy Minister for Bilateral Foreign Policy José Julio Gómez explained the cuts were made to eliminate wasteful spending from the Ministry of Foreign Relations’ budget.



Read more in Spanish:Somos Pueblo



28 September 2020
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user123

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Who wants to bet that all those PLD botellas will soon be replaced by PRM botellas? :) Foreign Service appointments/jobs are how you thank the party foot soldiers and fundraisers, and you keep them on the government payroll so they are still around in 4 years. Not just in DR but everywhere in the World, most US ambassadors are "thank you for the money" appointments. US President directly appoints 4.000 people into Federal government, 99% are botellas waiting for the next elections.
 
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TropicalPaul

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I also wonder whether it is sensible to remove all this money from the economy right now. All these people may be corrupt but they all went shopping and spent money with local businesses. The government needs to be pumping the max into the economy at the moment to keep it going.
 

Caonabo

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Who wants to bet that all those PLD botellas will soon be replaced by PRM botellas? :) Foreign Service appointments/jobs are how you thank the party foot soldiers and fundraisers, and you keep them on the government payroll so they are still around in 4 years. Not just in DR but everywhere in the World, most US ambassadors are "thank you for the money" appointments. US President directly appoints 4.000 people into Federal government, 99% are botellas waiting for the next elections.
While the majority of your posting is legitimate in substance, I do not believe we will see the grand scale abuse of no-show/direct deposit positions as we have in the past. While some may slip between the cracks, as is always inevitable, being the standard normal operating procedure will not be tolerated.
The new administration has pledged to be transparent, and has put themselves out there as such from top to bottom.
I believe the younger generation and quality of those within this administration will change the channel on such popular programming.
Of course, time will tell.
 
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JDJones

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While the majority of your posting is legitimate in substance, I do not believe we will see the grand scale abuse of no-show/direct deposit positions as we have in the past. While some may slip between the cracks, as is always inevitable, being the standard normal operating procedure will not be tolerated.
The new administration has pledged to be transparent, and has put themselves out there as such from top to bottom.
I believe the younger generation and quality of those within this administration will change the channel on such popular programming.
Of course, time will tell.
I agree. There were literally hundreds of thousands of Botellas in the last administration. Obviously they can't get rid of all of them at once due to the impact it would have on the economy but I think we'll see a steady stream of them over the next month or so.
 
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Caonabo

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I also wonder whether it is sensible to remove all this money from the economy right now. All these people may be corrupt but they all went shopping and spent money with local businesses. The government needs to be pumping the max into the economy at the moment to keep it going.
Are you serious?
Hey, let's not crack down on corrupt officials or criminals either, because after all, they pump money into the economy as well.
:sneaky::sneaky::sneaky:
 

TropicalPaul

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Please don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I totally agree that these people need to go. But right now the economy is in such a state that the government sacking a whole load of people, whoever they are, isn't going to make things any better. All these people, corrupt as they are, go shopping and buy stuff.
 

NanSanPedro

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Please don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I totally agree that these people need to go. But right now the economy is in such a state that the government sacking a whole load of people, whoever they are, isn't going to make things any better. All these people, corrupt as they are, go shopping and buy stuff.
But it's not like the money they have been getting won't get spent. The government will spend it elsewhere, hopefully on something a bit more useful.
 

william webster

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Rep Dom is NOT a poor country..... but the money is misspent ....

$2.6 B here
Mrs President had 600 people on her staff--- 600!!!
Redundant departments.... no show workers....

Gold is rich now, look at the excess being uncovered in just a month or so.
Imagine how deep that well of cash is...

Schools, hospitals, social plans.....a long list
 

TropicalPaul

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The key thing is what the government spends the money on. If they sack people, but use this money to buy for example some extra train cars for the Metro which they import from Italy, then the money leaves the country and doesn't recirculate. If you pay someone a salary and they then spend it all, for example employing maids, or buying stuff at local shops, then that money recirculates. I remember reading that when the Colombian government really stamped on the drug cartels, it had a negative effect on the economy. So ideally they need to spend this money in a way that it gets into the hands of local people, ideally the poorest, who then spend it all mainly locally, and it has a ripple effect.
 
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John Boyter

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The key thing is what the government spends the money on. If they sack people, but use this money to buy for example some extra train cars for the Metro which they import from Italy, then the money leaves the country and doesn't recirculate. If you pay someone a salary and they then spend it all, for example employing maids, or buying stuff at local shops, then that money recirculates. I remember reading that when the Colombian government really stamped on the drug cartels, it had a negative effect on the economy. So ideally they need to spend this money in a way that it gets into the hands of local people, ideally the poorest, who then spend it all mainly locally, and it has a ripple effect.
Good point
 

Caonabo

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I still can't wrap my head around the fact that some are glossing over corruption and criminal activity for the sake of the economy.
One step foward, two steps back.
 
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JDJones

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I still can't wrap my head around the fact that some are glossing over corruption and criminal activity for the sake of the economy.
One step foward, two steps back.
Rome wasn't built in a day. I still think there's going to be a steady succession of heads rolling. They've been pretty regular at it so far.
 
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CristoRey

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Please don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I totally agree that these people need to go. But right now the economy is in such a state that the government sacking a whole load of people, whoever they are, isn't going to make things any better. All these people, corrupt as they are, go shopping and buy stuff.
Its my understanding after reading this article and several others
published this week, most of these people were living/ working outside of
the Dominican Republic. Therefor one can only assume most of
this money was being spent elsewhere?