Abinader promises universal medical coverage

Dolores

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President-elect Luis Abinader tweeted on Sunday, 9 August that by December 2020 all Dominicans that are not affiliated to medical plans would be given access to the government’s Family Health Plan. He said the medical coverage resources would come from the savings that will be obtained with the restructuring of government. The new financial authorities estimate they will have savings of RD$2 billion, which will be enough to add the missing two million Dominicans to the government insurance plan.



A feature in Listin Diario published today looks into the doubling in the number of employees and the 541% increase in the payroll from 2004 to 2016 under the Leonel Fernández and Danilo Medina administrations.



A feature in Acento focuses on wasteful spending at the government power utilities.



A feature in Somos Pueblo looks into a US$14 million...
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tempo

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Very interesting. It is bold but what the heck. Perhaps our dear leader and that one in Brazil can learn a lesson or two, too!
 
Sep 22, 2009
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Even modest improvements in funding would definitely improve the living standard for many poor dominicans.
The Solidaridad program initiated around 2010 or 11. This has grown. Health programs through Senansa have improved significantly. Baby steps guys. Sounds like we have some socialism pushers here. Can't make DR like EU again!
 

GringoRubio

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You think that works fine?
I assume you're referring to public hospitals. And, yes, it works quite well when there is no alternative. I know a number of people that rely on it for primary care and can't afford private care.

Of course, there are limits. I helped ($$-wise) for a older woman to get help with her veins. Just to see a specialist is 4000 pesos which is out of reach for the poor. (I'm hidden in this as I don't need trouble with her family or her needing to pay gringo rates). Although veins aren't immediately life threatening, they are extremely painful and could lead to thrombosis or clotting which could be life threatening.

Trust me when I say that even modest improvements in the public hospital can have large impacts on the community they serve.
 
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John Boyter

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The Solidaridad program initiated around 2010 or 11. This has grown. Health programs through Senansa have improved significantly. Baby steps guys. Sounds like we have some socialism pushers here. Can't make DR like EU again!
Senasa is a good start. No I don’t think its socialism. Most people should still pay their own. Regarding EU. Thats a myth. Many countries there have a growing mixed public and private insurance. Often when its only public it becomes corrupt. Each country need to find their own system. I agree baby steps in the DR.
 
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Fulano2

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I assume you're referring to public hospitals. And, yes, it works quite well when there is no alternative. I know a number of people that rely on it for primary care and can't afford private care.

Of course, there are limits. I helped ($$-wise) for a older woman to get help with her veins. Just to see a specialist is 4000 pesos which is out of reach for the poor. (I'm hidden in this as I don't need trouble with her family or her needing to pay gringo rates). Although veins aren't immediately life threatening, they are extremely painful and could lead to thrombosis or clotting which could be life threatening.

Trust me when I say that even modest improvements in the public hospital can have large impacts on the community they serve.
Yes GR I was referring to public hospitals. I have bad experiences with it in La Vega and lately in Río San Juan. Personally I would classify them as better than nothing. Maybe in SD and Santiago nowadays they are better. That I don’t know.
 
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GringoRubio

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Yes GR I was referring to public hospitals. I have bad experiences with it in La Vega and lately in Río San Juan. Personally I would classify them as better than nothing. Maybe in SD and Santiago nowadays they are better. That I don’t know.
You nailed it.

Like most things, it depends. If you have a cut and need stitches, they can do that. Any chronic condition is just not treated other then the DR version of palliative care.

I got to be friends with a number of chikas in Sosua and the #1 reason that they had for needing the money was because someone in the family (usually the grandmother) had a chronic health condition. If that sounds like a likely story, I have a new housemate which is a 10 year old haitian girl. Her mother picking vegetables 14 hours a day for 600 pesos/day.