After the landing

Pavan

Member
Jan 18, 2002
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We all have read countless times about how Dominicans leave the island illegally in small boats (Yolas). Their destination of choice is obviously Puerto Rico. Just about 80 miles of sea separates the two islands. Actually when you fly from San Juan to Miami or any other city in that direction, on a clear day it is possible to see the two islands at the same time. So close yet completely different.

After having lived on the North West coast of Puerto Rico for a while now. I have met many people, both Dominicans and Puerto Ricans who have been involved directly or indirectly with the illegal exodus of Dominicans.

What I will write further is something which is hardly addressed. What happens after the landing?

The US coast guard now has five or six new helicopters which are now equipped with thermal equipment which makes it easier to spot a small boat in the dark blue ocean than with naked eyes during the day. This makes an illegal and dangerous journey even more futile as far as the success rate is concerned.

But, some do make it to the Puerto Rican shores and usually at night. They always seem to land on the secluded beaches of Mayaguez, the northern tip of Aguadilla or as far as Camuy and Arecibo. They cannot land in front of Isabela or Quebradillas because of high waves and reefs which abound these areas.

Once on land. It is a mad dash to inland areas. Some have no shoes or barely any clothes. Usually one or two will suffer injuries falling over rocks and reefs. Those immobilized are usually killed by their own by strangling or rocks. Most don?t have money on them either. Most will make for some house which looks abandoned, walking in the bushes alongside the roads. As soon as a car comes they hide in the bushes. Now, the coast guard uses spot lights to light up the roadside foliage and pick up many illegals.

Those who survive the landing. Usually the last thing they have to worry is about Puerto Ricans giving them away. Almost all Puerto Ricans I have talked to, have said that they have helped the Dominicans, given them food and clothing, make calls to their relatives for them etc. Almost all say that if necessary they will help any Dominican who needs help. They are running away from their loco president (Hipolito) they say.

The next day is the most crucial. The border patrol is on the lookout for those who landed during the night and it is difficult to hide. Plus without any money or food they do not have much time lose before reaching their contact in Puerto Rico. Usually some good Samaritan helps them with a phone call, a temporary shelter etc before the contact can come over and pick them up and take them to their final destination.

The contact is usually a relative or family friend. This person will keep the illegal around for menial work in a small restaurant, business, construction or a cattle ranch. There they stay until they realize that the whole thing was a mistake or they are discovered.

The women fare differently. If they are good looking. As if some un-written sequence of events is already planned for them. They will always end up in some rich old guy?s ranch as a maid and sex object or in a brothel in Old San Juan. Some may be lucky to end up a nannys in some well to do house hold. But, they are not immune to sexual overtures of the males who are around. It is common for Puerto Rican men to order a ?dominicanita? from one of the countless coyotes who run the business of ?localizar? the illegal immigrants.
 

Don Juan

Living Brain Donor
Dec 5, 2003
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We're a bunch of hypocrites!

I resent Puerto Ricans for treating us the way we treat Haitians. Shame on them and shame on us!

BTW, how do you know all this detailed stuff??
 

FuegoAzul21

New member
Jun 28, 2004
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Im Dominican and proud of it .I love my people and culture , but i feel little sympathy for them .They know Damn well what they are getting themselves into .They know that they are risking thier lives going in to a foriegn country with absolutly nothing.The smarter Dominicans (aside from the ones who come hear legally or go to europe)are the ones that fly to mexico(they are never gonna seal it completely) and cross there . Its dangerous but they can always give themselves into the border patrol or have family members for the states help them . if they get cuaght all they have to say is that they are mexicans from a border town .They have to research the town to know a little something of and pass for mexican,from there they try to cross again .All it takes is a little planning and they can get in illegally .This yola business is sooo not a good idea , i just cant imagine what those people must be thinkin ,its this entire image of streets covered with money that has these people nuts .yes, it sucks being poor in DR , but you will not die .You dont hear about people starving to death in DR , so if these yola people are willing to go through humiliation,poverty,exploitation,abuse,racism,discrimination,pain,and extortion ,to either be dead or become homeless second class citizens in PR then i dont see the point in feeling sorry for them .
 

Fiesta Mama

Bronze
Jan 28, 2004
772
58
0
I have never understood the plight of Dominicans wanting to flee to Puerto Rico? First of all they are risking their life to get there. Second if they get caught, not only will they be sent back to the Dominican Republic , they will never ever have the opportunity to leave the DR legally once they return (i.e. by obtaining a visa or residency for another country). Also the Dominicans are leaving their own country where they are free to do what )albeit likely very poorly if they are wanting to flee to PR) but they want to live illegally in a country where they are treated as the Haitians are treated in the DR. Sure they might make it to PR but then there is even a slimmer possibility of ever making it to New York (which is what I always understood to be the reason for most Dominicans fleeing to PR).

There is a great Dominican movie that details exactly what the original poster posted about. A Dominican guy that wants to get to New York and goes through Puerto Rico to do it and spends his whole life savings to do so. When he first arrives in Puerto Rico there are many problems because he is there illegally and when he finally makes it to New York he is living a far worse life than he ever had in the DR. I believe the name of the movie is Neuva Yol' (there is also a sequal call Nueva Yol' III - there is no # II) and the main character's name is Balbuena, that's his screen name. Once he arrives in New York he can't work because he doesn't have the legal papers to do so. He ends up working for under the table money as a bus boy and lives with his cousin and about 8 other people in a one bedroom apartment in the slums of New York City. I think all Dominicans that think they are going to strike it rich by either fleeing illegally to Puerto Rico or to New York should watch that movie as it is an excellent dose of reality!

Edited to add: I have witnessed poverty in the DR to the fullest degree and I can sadly say that yes I do understand the whys of why Dominicans try to flee for the dream of a better life... I only wish the ones doing so were better informed of the reality. I truly feel sorry for people in this very sad situation and it really makes me appreciate the freedom I have been given in life (I am from Canada).
 

Berzin

Banned
Nov 17, 2004
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Whenever I meet someone in the DR and we spend any time chatting this subject always comes up. I have to laugh when I tell people that just because I take a few vacations that does not make me rich. And when I try to tell them that the streets in New York City are NOT paved with gold, they sort of just look away and divert their attention to something else.
They don't want to hear reality.
And alot of it has to do with the dominicans who return to their country with their $100 shoes, gold jewelry that would make Mr.T blush and arrogant attitudes. They give native dominicans an extremely false view of what life is like for them in the US. I told a friend in Santo Domingo that it may come as a surprise to her but I have to WORK for my money. Nobody gives me anything and she seemed genuinely shocked. So go figure.
As for the "dominicanitas" that are used in the sex industry in Puerto Rico, there is the same underground network here in NYC for dominican girls. Except here they have more options-but the lure of easy money is just too hard to resist for some.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
4,545
487
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Yoleros=Locos

The yola problem is definitely due to the "gran manzana" myth which is encouraged by Dominicans who go back home to visit relatives, television and false pretenses. Again this comes down to social scale differences that exists among Dominicans. This is a crisis that exists among the poor and destitute who think that PR and furthermore NYC are solutions to their problems. Little do they know that if they are poor in the DR and PR they WILL be poor in NYC. If they do make it to "la gran manzana" what kind of jobs are they qualified to do, what skills sets do they have to ascertain a decent paying job, do they speak English and they are "indocumentados". With these negatives how could they think that their life would be better is beyond me. I don't see this problem ending anytime soon and sadly enough people are willing to risk their life and there is no guarantee that the one they are striving for will be any better. Not worth commenting on the under ground "sex industry".


LDG.
 
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Talldrink

El Mujeron
Jan 7, 2004
2,209
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They only pay attention to the tales of the people who got there by Yola and not the stories about people dying...

I recently found out about my friend who supposedly left to go to Spain - thats what she was told. What they did was take her to Morocco and they are supposed to cross into Spain through a Yola. This was 2 weeks ago and no word on her whereabouts... Larry, AZB and Robert, you guys met her :(

The SAD part is that when I called her family, they were told she was in Marruecos (Spanish for Morocco) and they all think is this exotic location right near Spain - almost like a 'holding place' or a prelude to getting to the Magical Spain. When I asked them if they knew that Morocco is in AFRICA and that she had to cross the Gibraltar Strait (the friggin sea for God's sake!) they had NO clue what this girl had gotten herself into. So now everyone is worried, did they think it would be that easy to just get into Spain?? For all that trouble, why not go into a Central American country, at least you know the language! If you are willing to cross mountains on foot and take yolas and whatnot...

None of it makes sense to me. This girl does NOT have 10 kids to support or a husband that is beating her. She was young and beautiful and had a job and lived well. She had more gear than me (b/c all of us brought her so much from the States). But her eyes got full of stars when friends went back to buy jeepetas and everybody is getting tummy tucks.

This whole thing sucks big time and I already miss my friend!

BTW - Don Juan, your post is not a fair statement. Yes, there are a lot of people that do not treat others right, but it can be said that Dominicans are guilty of the same sin in the way some treat Haitians. This is going against the original post, I do not want to highjack - but I had to make mention of the fact that as long as people think they have power over others, they will take advantage of it. And yes, I do believe that it is not a fair thing to do. I dont like to say that All Puertoricans are guilty of this, b/c I do not believe that I should be included when people say that ALL Dominicans treat Haitians bad...
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
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The way I see all of this...

is unnecessary humiliation for the country! The local news media now has something else to post other than the usual corruption and crime stuff and the international media (more so the Latin American than elsewhere) are at it again, showing every single Dominican yola that attempts to reach PR, but they forget to follow up on the thousands of people crossing into the US via Mexico?!

Total unnecessary humiliations.

As if that was not enough, these "yola" trips are evidence that Dominicans in general are risk takers. Many spend their entire life savings to take these trips (from my understanding), the problem is that they are "investing" in a very uncertain venture!

Many of these people could had started a small business with the money they are wasting in these trips. I'm sure the probability of a small business succeeding far outweight any probability of a successful "yola" trip. By successful, I mean reaching PR and being able to pass as legals or Puerto Ricans, etc.
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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487
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A miracle!

Nals,

We agree on something! It will rain more in Sto. Domingo.

I agree with you completely but not only are yoleros wasting money but some make repeated trips thus having had to find the money to pay for each attempted crossing.

This negative visibility is not only for Dominicans but other countries too have the same issue of nationals fleeing their country. It just depends on what the media wishes to focus on for their own intensive purposes.


LDG.
 

rellosk

Silver
Mar 18, 2002
4,159
54
0
Lesley D said:
... This is a crisis that exists among the poor and destitute who think that PR and furthermore NYC are solutions to their problems. Little do they know that if they are poor in the DR and PR they WILL be poor in NYC.
Perhaps if they watched "Nueba Yol" they would think twice before boarding the yola.
 

AZB

Platinum
Jan 2, 2002
12,276
491
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Lesley D said:
Nals,

We agree on something! It will rain more in Sto. Domingo.

LDG.
Maybe, just maybe, you are coming to terms that finally a dominican is more intelligent and far more educated than you. hahahahaha
I know, I know, dominicans in charamico don't talk like that.
AZB
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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487
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AZB,

Not sure what you meant by your comment but Nals does which is more important. Keep laughing I think you are bored.



LDG.




AZB said:
Maybe, just maybe, you are coming to terms that finally a dominican is more intelligent and far more educated than you. hahahahaha
I know, I know, dominicans in charamico don't talk like that.
AZB
 

Larry

Gold
Mar 22, 2002
3,513
2
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Talldrink said:
I recently found out about my friend who supposedly left to go to Spain - thats what she was told. What they did was take her to Morocco and they are supposed to cross into Spain through a Yola. This was 2 weeks ago and no word on her whereabouts... Larry, AZB and Robert, you guys met her :(

TD, that girl is such a sweetheart. Please let me know when you hear something.

Larry
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
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560
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Lesley D said:
Nals,

We agree on something! It will rain more in Sto. Domingo.

LDG.
Oh My God!

I the world ending? Lesley agreeing to something I said?

Am I imagining things?

;) ;) ;) ;) ;)

Maybe miracles do happen afterall! :surprised

Seriously,if you think about it, there is tremendous business opportunities that can be accomplished if a group of poor Dominicans pool their money and start up a small business, as long that they maintain some sort of good harmony among each other.

Every time I see the news showing 10, 20 etc number of criollos in a yola, each paid thousands of pesos to get their spot on the yola, if that same group would have used that capital to open up a small business, the probability of success will be so much better.

And, if they were unlucky to lose their business venture due to market or anything else, at least they still have their lives (unlike in many of these yola trips). As long that you continue to live, life will always give you multiple chances to do things right.
 

Chirimoya

Moderator - East Coast & Headline News
Dec 9, 2002
17,850
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Do Dominicans still need visas for Morocco?

If Morocco has stopped asking Dominicans for visas, or is handing them out willy nilly, it won't be long before the Spaniards will get wind of this suspicious increase in Dominican 'tourism' to Morocco!

Talldrink's friend's story shows how there are no limits to what people will do in pursuit of this deluded dream, and how little they know about where they are going, or how to get there. She was probably told that it is a mere 7-km crossing across the Strait (which it is at its narrowest point) but not about how well-policed it is and how many dozens of illegals are intercepted or end up drowning and washed onto the beaches. She won't have been told that she will be just one of thousands of hopefuls from Morocco and other African countries who flock to that area with the same desperate dream.

On the plus side, she will find that many people in Morocco, especially in the northern, coastal areas still speak Spanish (it used to belong to Spain and two cities - Ceuta and Melilla - still do) so she won't be too bewildered there.

If she is stuck in Morocco, though, she will find herself in a country many times worse than the DR in terms of poverty and employment opportunities. Not to mention the culture shock and the treatment of women: western women are considered fair game (because they're all perceived to be sluts), while many Moroccan women still wear the djellabah which hides their entire body except for the eyes.

It is a wonderful country in many ways, but I suspect she isn't there for its tourist attractions. Do you know if she has the opt out clause of a ticket home? Maybe she hasn't attempted to make the crossing and will come to her senses - I certainly hope so.

Oh yeah, and I agree with Nals too.
In other news, flying pigs spotted over the city of Santo Domingo. ;)
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
4,545
487
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Nals,

Yes, like I said I agree and that's not the only way they could better use the limited funds that they have....but those who take the risk are blinded by the false ideals and those who do make it to PR (at least) think they have achieved something because chances are they know someone there etc. etc.


PD. Miracles are possible once in a blue moon.

LDG.


Nal0whs said:
Oh My God!

I the world ending? Lesley agreeing to something I said?

Am I imagining things?

;) ;) ;) ;) ;)

Maybe miracles do happen afterall! :surprised

Seriously,if you think about it, there is tremendous business opportunities that can be accomplished if a group of poor Dominicans pool their money and start up a small business, as long that they maintain some sort of good harmony among each other.

Every time I see the news showing 10, 20 etc number of criollos in a yola, each paid thousands of pesos to get their spot on the yola, if that same group would have used that capital to open up a small business, the probability of success will be so much better.

And, if they were unlucky to lose their business venture due to market or anything else, at least they still have their lives (unlike in many of these yola trips). As long that you continue to live, life will always give you multiple chances to do things right.
 
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miguel

I didn't last long...
Jul 2, 2003
5,261
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So true!!

Berzin said:
And alot of it has to do with the dominicans who return to their country with their $100 shoes, gold jewelry that would make Mr.T blush and arrogant attitudes. They give native dominicans an extremely false view of what life is like for them in the US. I told a friend in Santo Domingo that it may come as a surprise to her but I have to WORK for my money. Nobody gives me anything and she seemed genuinely shocked. So go figure.
As for the "dominicanitas" that are used in the sex industry in Puerto Rico, there is the same underground network here in NYC for dominican girls. Except here they have more options-but the lure of easy money is just too hard to resist for some.
Not only do I agree with you, 1,000% but you wrote, just about, the same post that I wrote here more than a year ago.

ALOT has to do with visiting dominicans "making believe" that they are doing so well. I knew a guy that he would borrow things(clothing, jewelry) from his brothers and friends before going to the DR because he "needed" to impress his "people". Some would lie about their jobs, where they live, how much they make, what kind of cars they drive, when in reality, some of their friends in the DR are much better off than them. They think that "showing-off" is the right thing to do. They NEED to rent that expensive Jeepeta. They need to take their friends on everyday outings, they need to pay for everything. Some do such things, not because they can afford it, no, some do it because they need to show off. Then when they get back to their adopted country, it's "DEBT TIME". Now it's time to kill themselves working because they now need to plan that next vacation. HUMBLINESS MAKES CHARACTER.

Na0whs, I do agree with you also, if they would just get together, they can start a small business with what they are paying for the yola trip. A childhood friend of mine, whom I had not seen for yearrrrs, told her family that she was going to Spain to take care of handicapped people (like there's no Spaniards that can do that). She had no kids, no husband, had a home, a car, a job but she still left. Everything was fine and dandy until the truth came out, she was in Greece dancing in a strip bar with more than 50 other dominican girls, turning tricks and working as a hooker afterhours. That's the reason why my face makes a funny "movement" when I hear friends telling me about some girls going to other countries to "dance", "take care of people", "be maids", ect, etc....
 

Berzin

Banned
Nov 17, 2004
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It is estimated that there are over 50,000 dominican women working in the sex trade in other countries. Not an export to be proud of.
 

Ricardo900

Silver
Jul 12, 2004
3,269
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48
It's probably true

Berzin said:
It is estimated that there are over 50,000 dominican women working in the sex trade in other countries. Not an export to be proud of.
When dominicans illegally come to the U.S. They have limited work opportunities. They are un-educated (In US standards) and are forced to work as prostitutes or the service industry, ie. cleaning. And they have to compete with the illegal mexicans for the low paying jobs, which is very very difficult. The dominicans that are doing well in the U.S. are the ones who are very educated, english speakers, and probably came to the U.S. on a visa.
 

yvette

New member
Jun 18, 2004
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Pavan said:
What I will write further is something which is hardly addressed. What
Once on land. It is a mad dash to inland areas. Some have no shoes or barely any clothes. Usually one or two will suffer injuries falling over rocks and reefs. Those immobilized are usually killed by their own by strangling or rocks. Most don?t have money on them either. Most will make for some house which looks abandoned, walking in the bushes alongside the roads. As soon as a car comes they hide in the bushes. Now, the coast guard uses spot lights to light up the roadside foliage and pick up many illegals.

Those who survive the landing. Usually the last thing they have to worry is about Puerto Ricans giving them away. Almost all Puerto Ricans I have talked to, have said that they have helped the Dominicans, given them food and clothing, make calls to their relatives for them etc. Almost all say that if necessary they will help any Dominican who needs help. They are running away from their loco president (Hipolito) they say.

The next day is the most crucial. The border patrol is on the lookout for those who landed during the night and it is difficult to hide. Plus without any money or food they do not have much time lose before reaching their contact in Puerto Rico. Usually some good Samaritan helps them with a phone call, a temporary shelter etc before the contact can come over and pick them up and take them to their final destination.

The contact is usually a relative or family friend. This person will keep the illegal around for menial work in a small restaurant, business, construction or a cattle ranch. There they stay until they realize that the whole thing was a mistake or they are discovered.

The women fare differently. If they are good looking. As if some un-written sequence of events is already planned for them. They will always end up in some rich old guy?s ranch as a maid and sex object or in a brothel in Old San Juan. Some may be lucky to end up a nannys in some well to do house hold. But, they are not immune to sexual overtures of the males who are around. It is common for Puerto Rican men to order a ?dominicanita? from one of the countless coyotes who run the business of ?localizar? the illegal immigrants.

Truely a sad state of affairs, my heart was touched. How hopeless to seek a land flowing with milk and honey on this planet Earth. :cry:

Yvette