Ambev announces plans to plant the corn it now imports to produce beer

Status
Not open for further replies.

Dolores

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 20, 2019
12,514
1,913
93
Maiz-Listin-Diario-1024x572.png


The top brass of Ambev beer brewery in the Dominican Republic says the Brazilian company is going ahead with its plan to produce here the grains it now imports to produce beer. The company imports 30,000 tons of corn to produce its beers.

Ambev vice president Luis Alvarez said the company is also going ahead with new investments in renewable energy generating matrix. The company will be installinga solar energy park with 50 MW capacity in Maria Trinidad Sanchez province.

Likewise, the company explained during the Central Bank meeting its plans to invest in a glass cluster for the manufacture of beer bottles locally. A recycling plant is part of this development. At present, most bottles are imported.

Ambev executives Ana María Martínez, director of corporate affairs, and Jochy Pérez, manager of government affairs also attended.

Also present for the Central Bank at the meeting...

Continue reading...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
"The top brass of Ambev beer brewery in the Dominican Republic says the Brazilian company is going ahead with its plan to produce here the grains it now imports to produce beer. The company imports 30,000 tons of corn to produce its beers."

Many questions...short tons or metric tons❓
Big difference‼️

I got a real problem with this. This is an island. That is an insane of amount of land needed to produce 30,000 tons (short ton)
5357 acres.
To produce what?
(insert compound profanity of your choice here)
 

La Profe_1

Moderator: Daily Headline News, Travel & Tourism
Oct 15, 2003
2,110
651
113
Vegas (and D'Arcy when you return) take your vaudeville show out of the News forum.

This is your only warning.
 
Last edited:
  • Love
Reactions: windeguy

reilleyp

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2006
949
441
83
I would like the DR to produce more corn. I certainly miss the PA Sweet corn during other 9 months of the year.
Many brewers use corn, rice as well. Below is a good explanation;
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
7,252
4,588
113
I would like the DR to produce more corn. I certainly miss the PA Sweet corn during other 9 months of the year.
Many brewers use corn, rice as well. Below is a good explanation;
What an interesting article. Who knew?
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
Does anyone else question if the use of 5000+ acres of land should be diverted for the growth of this corn instead of being used to produce crops intended for livestock (pigs and chickens) or direct human consumption ❓
 

reilleyp

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2006
949
441
83
Does anyone else question if the use of 5000+ acres of land should be diverted for the growth of this corn instead of being used to produce crops intended for livestock (pigs and chickens) or direct human consumption ❓
The spent grain or beer mash is frequently given to cows and pigs as supplemental food. The leftover cobs as well. The #1 demand at the disco is beer, food is a secondary concern in the DR.
 
Jan 9, 2004
10,378
1,588
113
The spent grain or beer mash is frequently given to cows and pigs as supplemental food. The leftover cobs as well. The #1 demand at the disco is beer, food is a secondary concern in the DR.
There are so many other uses for corn beyond making beer.

First, there are two types of corn, there is the sweet corn we all know and then there is cattle corn/feed corn. The latter is what they are looking to produce. It is my understanding that corn does not do well in the DR climates.

If they figure out a way to produce it here, the value added to the economy is widespread. Everything from animal feed, as you indicate, to ethanol, corn flakes, corn syrup and of course distiller grains.

It is one of the most versatile crops, next to soybeans, that can be planted.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
The spent grain or beer mash is frequently given to cows and pigs as supplemental food. The leftover cobs as well. The #1 demand at the disco is beer, food is a secondary concern in the DR.
Cows are ruminants and should not be given corn nor should spent grain given to them of any type. Nature intended them to eat grass. Drive around the 🇩🇴 look at how cows are grazing in the countryside. Full Stop.

Spent grain and beer mash that are corn can be used as fillers and do not provide any nutritional addition to the diet of pigs. But pigs do enjoy corn (husks and all) and consider it a real treat.

I am wondering, did you just pull that information you posted off of google or do you actually use spent grain to beer mash during your feeding operation to raise livestock (Cows, pigs, chickens) ❓
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
There are so many other uses for corn beyond making beer.

First, there are two types of corn, there is the sweet corn we all know and then there is cattle corn/feed corn. The latter is what they are looking to produce. It is my understanding that corn does not do well in the DR climates.

If they figure out a way to produce it here, the value added to the economy is widespread. Everything from animal feed, as you indicate, to ethanol, corn flakes, corn syrup and of course distiller grains.

It is one of the most versatile crops, next to soybeans, that can be planted.
It would be an absolute disaster to switch cattle that currently graze on grass here in the 🇩🇴 to corn.
Nor would it be good for the farmers or the diet of everyday Dominicans.
Corn maybe indeed versatile but it must be used in the right way.
The food production system in the 🇩🇴 is not broke and does not need to be fixed.

For a detailed dive into the subject reference is made to the following book:

 
Jan 9, 2004
10,378
1,588
113
Which is why they want to use it to make beer.

And not to forget all those leftover corn stalks that can be used for livestock forage.

Again, it all may be a moot point as corn does not seem to do well in the DR climates.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
It is not a moot point.
Corn the plant is very adaptable.
If a focus it is placed on selecting the exemplars of the right type and the genetics that flourish here in this climate, corn will grow.
But it may not be the type of corn that works for a very specific application like brewing, distilling vodka or my favorite Bourbon

There is a great Bourbon thread here in DR1.
And Bourbon must have a mash bill of at list 51% corn.
That is corn worth growing.
BOOYAO ‼️

🌾🌽🥃🥃
 

reilleyp

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2006
949
441
83
Cows are ruminants and should not be given corn nor should spent grain given to them of any type. Nature intended them to eat grass. Drive around the 🇩🇴 look at how cows are grazing in the countryside. Full Stop.

Spent grain and beer mash that are corn can be used as fillers and do not provide any nutritional addition to the diet of pigs. But pigs do enjoy corn (husks and all) and consider it a real treat.

I am wondering, did you just pull that information you posted off of google or do you actually use spent grain to beer mash during your feeding operation to raise livestock (Cows, pigs, chickens) ❓
I live in an area where agriculture is on one side of the mountain and forest land is on the other side of the mountain. On the agricultural side the deer tend to eat the corn and soy beans and avoid the grasses. On the forest so they eat whatever they can find. During hunting season you can always tell which side the deer was from. The meat from the agricultural side was much tastier and a little bit fattier so it wasn’t so tough and had some flavor. Nobody told the deer what to eat. It was just nature taking its course. Having said all that you would be surprised to see what they feed cows and pigs in many parts of the world. If a batch of bread or cereal or other food product goes bad it is often given to the cows and pigs as feed. In my area there is a potato chip factory and if a batch of chips goes bad or is outdated, it is sent out for feed. It does not bother the animals. Cows are usually butchered at around 18 months, so their long term gastrointestinal health effects are not a concern, and I would assume have not been studied. My info is all first hand knowledge, but since I don’t have time to write all day, it is easier for me to give a link to a webpage.
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
2,712
1,921
113
-
Having said all that you would be surprised to see what they feed cows and pigs in many parts of the world.
Are you sure about that ❓
But to not keep you in suspense I am not.
If a batch of bread or cereal or other food product goes bad it is often given to the cows and pigs as feed. In my area there is a potato chip factory and if a batch of chips goes bad or is outdated, it is sent out for feed. It does not bother the animals. Cows are usually butchered at around 18 months, so their long term gastrointestinal health effects are not a concern, and I would assume have not been studied.
So, I take issue with several of your points especially with the one about cows.
It may not bother the animals.
Dey gotta eat.
But it should bother the individuals who eat the animals.
After all you are paying for it.
My info is all first hand knowledge, but since I don’t have time to write all day, it is easier for me to give a link to a webpage.
Well then it is great to share knowledge with someone who knows of what they speak.
When a farmer does not engage in the standard industrial processes in a feeding operation.
The result is in the meat that is produced
It simply tastes better‼️

I do not have time to write all day.
Especially to educate those who are putting out incorrect information.
But I do think everyone should take a moment and think about where their food comes from.
Get to know a local farmer and learn how your food is produced.
You will be glad you did.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.