An obvious answer to a tough question!

Don Juan

Living Brain Donor
Dec 5, 2003
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In one of the threads in this forum (the next ten years) we discuss in great lenght and detail the whys and what-have-you's of our educational shortcomings...I believe the following may be one of many ways we can work on to solve it:

There's no arguing that the miserable state of our educational system can be readily fixed in a relative short time by investing heavily into it. But,where would the $$ come from?

It will come in the form of a tax or surcharge on bank transactions or cash transmittals to the DR from every Dominican expat living in the US, Canada and the E U.

Our government can require that (banks and exchange houses) set aside one to five per cent out of every dollar or euro sent there. I don't know what the latest monthly $ transmittal figure is, but the amount can probably be huge. Maybe one of our statistically savvy DR1rs can post the answer.

This money will go exclusively to supply our schools and pay our teachers. This $$ can potentially be more than enough to better train teachers and build more schools. The school days can be lenghten from three or four hours as it is now, to six or more, provided that, we can also feed our children a nutritious lunch.

Few of us DR expats will miss the few cents contributed to this noble cause, much less, get upset about it. I hope Leonel is reading up on this forum and explore this untapped source of energy to grow the seed of knowledge.
 
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rellosk

Silver
Mar 18, 2002
4,164
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Do you really believe that money from an additional tax will go to the schools? Until the government makes education a priority, collecting more taxes won't help.

I remember reading on DR1 about a government program to provide free breakfast at the schools. The cost of the program was approved and budgeted, the vice-president proudly announced the program. A few months later the news said program was suspended because the government never paid the suppliers.

Throwing money at a problem is rarely a successful solution. People need to be educated about the importance of education.
 

Don Juan

Living Brain Donor
Dec 5, 2003
856
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Yes, I do think so!

Collecting additional taxes means being able to do much more! What the govt. decides to do with it is another matter. If they feel, as we do, that this is a most urgent and present necessity, then they might make it a priority. If not, then in the next election we have to get people in that can make it so.

...And yes I do think that throwing money at a problem IS the solution! n'est-ce pas? rellosk?
 
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bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
5,050
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Not unless there is accountability

Don Juan said:
Collecting additional taxes means being able to do much more! What the govt. decides to do with it is another matter. If they feel, as we do, that this is a most urgent and present necessity, then they might make it a priority. If not, then in the next election we have to get people in that can make it so.

...And yes I do think that throwing money at a problem IS the solution! n'est-ce pas? rellosk?

You can throw all the money you want at the problem but until there is accountibility for the money it will not go where it is supposed to. After the accountibility is established then you can throw the money at it. As it is right now there is no accountibility for any gov. action.
 

CyaBye3015

Bronze
Jan 8, 2003
1,462
22
0
Don Juan said:
In one of the threads in this forum (the next ten years) we discuss in great lenght and detail the whys and what-have-you's of our educational shortcomings...I believe the following may be one of many ways we can work on to solve it:

There's no arguing that the miserable state of our educational system can be readily fixed in a relative short time by investing heavily into it. But,where would the $$ come from?

It will come in the form of a tax or surcharge on bank transactions or cash transmittals to the DR from every Dominican expat living in the US, Canada and the E U.

Our government can require that (banks and exchange houses) set aside one to five per cent out of every dollar or euro sent there. I don't know what the latest monthly $ transmittal figure is, but the amount can probably be huge. Maybe one of our statistically savvy DR1rs can post the answer.

This money will go exclusively to supply our schools and pay our teachers. This $$ can potentially be more than enough to better train teachers and build more schools. The school days can be lenghten from three or four hours as it is now, to six or more, provided that, we can also feed our children a nutritious lunch.

Few of us DR expats will miss the few cents contributed to this noble cause, much less, get upset about it. I hope Leonel is reading up on this forum and explore this untapped source of energy to grow the seed of knowledge.

Spoken like a true socialist, this concept is what made the USSR, Cuba, and China what they are today.
 

Don Juan

Living Brain Donor
Dec 5, 2003
856
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What?, huh?, como?, que?

CyaBye3015 said:
Spoken like a true socialist, this concept is what made the USSR, Cuba, and China what they are today.

How does taxing a product or service= socialism?

Btw. The only "true socialist" nation, as everyone knows except you, is Cuba...theres no "USSR" anymore. Russia and China, to our detriment, have abbandoned their commie ways. Taxing is, unfortunately, part of our capitalist system. Vien?
 

Hillbilly

Moderator
Jan 1, 2002
18,948
512
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I think the figure

is between 2 and 4 billion a year in remittances. It's in the Archives...

Throw money at a problem? Yeah, if you are Pedro Martinez and can hit what you throw it at. The cited case of school breakfasts is just one of the bamboozles they pull on us....

HB :p:p
 

Syork

New member
Sep 5, 2004
151
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Real issue in public education

The real issue in the public education debacle in the Dominican Republic, and indeed, in most of Latin America, is that the public officials that make the decisions have never been in public schools, nor do they have their children in public schools. There is no pressing need for them to do anything to improve public education because it does not directly affect them or their families, or so they think.
The poorer the public education system, the easier it is to keep wages low for many workers. The public education system here will never change as long as change is dictated from the top.

Rick
 

atienoor

New member
Mar 8, 2004
55
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Community Centred Development

Syork,

Well said. But I do not see the ordinary man whose kids attend public schools demanding change either. True change has to be owned by people. Education for most people in the DR is just a road to fleecing the system. Even those (not all) who have attended the so called "good" schools leave alot to be desired in terms finesse and making "good choices" in life. I mean just look at some of the posts in DR1..................

Good public education can thrive even in corrupt countries if people value education. I come from one of the most corrupt countries in the world. A few years ago, young people who were working hard in school and getting nowhere decided to vote out a dictatorship. Everyone saw this as an opportunity to institue change. Primary education is now free in Kenya (not an extremely wealthy country either) and even 18 year olds went back to enroll, why because people understand the connection between education, good goverannce and better standards of living for all.

Kenya is still corrupt, we have a million and one governance, social and economic problems but at the same time, we are enlightening the future (through good education) who will hopefully turn things around and firmly set the country on th road to development.

And you will be amazed at how many people will step up to help once a government proves it is really dedicated to educating its people. This includes the private sector, international and bilateral organizations. DR is small enough that it can be done. The will seems to be lacking though.........
 

FALCON

New member
May 8, 2005
14
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0
Good comments on here..

The DR needs to lower taxes, so that it can pay for these primary needs, such as education...

I can wait to hear the replies to this one, it will separate the men from the boys...

Falcon

PS. I enjoyed the insight the writer had about Kenya, good work!
 

Cleef

Bronze
Feb 24, 2002
1,797
6
0
Anyone been reading the news?

Just the other day it was announced that there is actually a law in the DR that states x% of governmental spending is to go directly to education.

I don't remember the exact parameters, but only a small portion of the percentage has ever gone towards education. The most recent reason being the strict directives of the IMF concerning economic recovery.

Very little difference in approach in the US, just on a different scale. Not many congressman or senators send their kids to public schools.

It would only be human nature to limit spending on education (in politicians). A stupid population is much easier to regulate, tax, discipline, sway, etc.

Thankfully I'm smrt.
 

daddy1

New member
Feb 27, 2004
350
0
0
the gov't knows education means empowering the people, this is a problem for them!!

Remember last year when the student's at la W.A.S. ripped a Hippo Mejia plaque off the so called library building which was empty, some Dominican's said that there reaction was disrespectful...but I gave them a standing ovation !! the students there have been educationally neglected.. you know D.R. has not had a politician yet to make education his priority, I believed that leonel would be the guy being that he was educated in the U.S. but he is to caught up with trying to build a mini Manhatten, and not paying much attention to what the country really would benefit from.. I mean that's like JFK saying that he was going to start a space program... and at the same time have insufficient schooling in America, people wouldn't understand what they would be doing up there anyway....


When the African American was neglected education here in the U.S. they had community leaders who were relentless in seeking equality to desegregate the school systems, especially in the south.. these efforts payed off!! The D.R. has not found it's Malcolm X or Howard, yet! but one day we will see one emerge somewhere.


To seek and change D.R.s educational system, money is not the problem!!
because.. the money has always been there, and it's still there RIGHT NOW!!
as we speak...but to seek this God given benefit called education, you can't ask for it nicely there anymore, you have to demand it!!...and you have to want it, and since expat's and locals alike are not fighting for it, then you won't get it...it will only be optional and those who can put money in the pockets of those politician's who run those private school's will never see the benefit's given to the island as a whole..it would be business as usual..


Expat's, and Dominican American's around the world especially in the U.S. has to lobby and form marches in these parades, in Capital hill, and at the Dominican embassy in NYC. in peaceful protest, yes a radical approach has to be excercised to gain ground in this ongoing battle just look at D.R's lastest educational statistics,if the new school Baby boomers come together this will get major publicity in the press!! you see this is called a movement, this is called wanting it, someone has to care for the children of the island because these children are under attack..by there Gov't, by Major league baseball, and by the older generation of Dominicans who keep Trujillo's ghost roaming the streets, teaching counter-productive methods of living and confusing there children with liquor, womenizing, caring guns, night clubs, and having young women think that in there tight pants lies there self - esteem and there personality! a large gathering of Dominican men and women by the Thousands would set the tone, and they will have to listen
if not heavy boycotts of there visits to the U.S. should be met with heavy resistance when begging the U.S. goverment for money to secure there financial pockets and once again keep another Mafialized gov't up and running.


look we just have to ask ourselves as a community, exactly what do we want the future of the D.R. to look like, is it giong to keep producing non english speaking low wage factory workers, or maintanance men, or security guards, or how about selfish baseball players, who are taught not to give back to the community...this island is not communist, nor does any dictators hold it hostage, we are not religiously fanatical, neither are we hutu or tussi, heck I am even going to say that the country is not as poor as it thinks it is, but that it makes POOR decisions and the people are drop dead tired and (amargao), with no fight left in them, only fighting when there food is in low supply, and the urge, excitment, and thirst to steal and make a quick buck keeps it's progress doing circles around itself..

Is there no Mella's or Sanchez' among us out there at all...it seems that when they died the nation's pride and National intelligence died with them...
when will this talented community wake up!!
 
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