Annoying Dominican Habits

Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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What about when playing with kids... We lift up off the floor ours kids by putting both hands on each side of their heads.

We call this, ver a Dios comiendo arroz!!!

JJ
I’ve never seen or heard of that in 11 years off and on here- nor do I ever wish to.
 
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Auryn

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I’ve never seen or heard of that in 11 years off and on here- nor do I ever wish to.
Correction-12. My first visit was 2011.

My in laws may not be totally perfect but they don’t lift children by their heads.
 
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bachata

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Correction-12. My first visit was 2011.

My in laws may not be totally perfect but they don’t lift children by their heads.
You may find out about this, just ask any Dominican. I used to play A ver a Dios comiendo arroz all my life in DR.
Here in US different story 😃

JJ
 

bachata

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Dominicans also play El Avion while feeding their little kids...
Ahi viene el avión!!! The spoon 🥄 with the meal is the ✈️✈️✈️ kids open theirs mouth and the plane lands... LOL

JJ
 
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NALs

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You may find out about this, just ask any Dominican. I used to play A ver a Dios comiendo arroz all my life in DR.
Here in US different story 😃

JJ
Keep in mind there are some differences from one region to another. They are few IMO since Dominicans tend to be much more culturally homogenous than anyone would think. Perhaps this leads many to think that it must be exactly the same everywhere.

I think Auryn is in San Pedro de Macorís. Case in point, while listening to merengue típico is very common in Santiago, almost no one listens to that in San Pedro.
 

cavok

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You ask a Dominican for directions and without pointing they say "mas arriba" or "mas a abajo". Meanwhile, the street you're on is perfectly level in both directions for as far as you can see.

You then get that sorted out and ask them on which side of the street it's on and they say "frente a la tienda de _______" which you have no idea which side that is on either.

I've totally given up on asking a Dominican for directions. Thank god for Google Maps!
 

bachata

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WHY ?????
Moto Looks more sport style and other than that at the time to sell you install all removed parts and make it look new again.
Thats why young guys remove all plastic hardware from Las Pasolas.

JJ
 

bachata

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When riding on a Voladora some people have to seat on what they call... EL PALITO DE LA COTORRA which is the engine hatch right behind driver @ front passenger seats, cushioned using a Dominican custom made folkloric carpet normally Dominican flag colors.

JJ
 

NALs

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You ask a Dominican for directions and without pointing they say "mas arriba" or "mas a abajo". Meanwhile, the street you're on is perfectly level in both directions for as far as you can see.

You then get that sorted out and ask them on which side of the street it's on and they say "frente a la tienda de _______" which you have no idea which side that is on either.

I've totally given up on asking a Dominican for directions. Thank god for Google Maps!
Google maps... saving expats in the DR one at a time.
 
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SKY

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Google maps... saving expats in the DR one at a time.
I was using Google maps the other day to find a hotel. I had a much better chance asking a deaf mute..................Works good on main roads, be careful anywhere off the beaten path. Took me to an apt. building nowhere near where I wanted to go. Another time in La Romana it directed me to a street that was a dead end going nowhere............

Moto Conhos are my Google Maps. They can find anything..........
 

Facepalm Supreme

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Quality thread, this. A lot of ground has been covered already.

"Me ofendiste" when they ask you for something that you decline to provide. I don't mind being asked to loan money or to help out in some way but my general policy is that I am not a bank, and don't perform loans. I will generally say something like "No, no puedo hacer prestamos." Or "No te puedo ayudar con eso". Having someone then respond, admonishing you to not be "tacaño" or telling you that you offended them by denying their request.

There is a lot of messed up psychology going on in that interaction.

Although there is a bad culture about respect on the roads and driving safely here and I've seen it first hand I want to take a moment to applaud the ability people here have of how to navigate in traffic. Lots of folks seem to be really good at spatial judgment and knowing when/if their vehicle will fit through any given space/ how close they can come to another vehicle without striking it. Gotta give praise where praise is due. It's really a skill many folks have honed.
 

chico bill

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How about plugging supermarket isles. Of course this also occurs with elderly who are unaware of their surroundings.

But young, and often ample in girth, Dominicans stand and block supermarket isles or sidewalks or door entrances.
They always find the point that creates the most congestion to stop and talk to a friend or uncle and are never in a hurry to uplug the blockage. They could care less about others inconvenience.

Yesterday I was a couple cars behind a dump truck who stopped in front of Sosua Beach to shoot the crap with another dump truck driver coming the other way while leaning out their driver's windows.

Despite horns honking and traffic piling up they decided it was a great time to discuss chicken and rice or their newest speaker install or whatever 'important' issue they wanted to jaw about.
Meanwhile everyone backed up did a slow burn.
 

Facepalm Supreme

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Just got back from running errands and thought of something else. WHY in 40% of these ubers/indrives are the seatbelts or seabelt buckles tucked in, cut off or otherwise inaccessible? Especially when the driver has his seatbelt fastened and secured, ready for the inevitable crash?

What gives, seriously? Sometimes they are tucked underneath the seat or behind the backrest. Obviously if they were cut off before being sent here I get it but why are these people making "aesthetic alterations" that involve removing or otherwise making inaccessible the saftey features of the car?

Ralph Nader went through hell to make these vehicles a lot safer. It makes *no* sense to be ****ing with the seatbelts.
 
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Lucifer

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Just got back from running errands and thought of something else. WHY in 40% of these ubers/indrives are the seatbelts or seabelt buckles tucked in, cut off or otherwise inaccessible? Especially when the driver has his seatbelt fastened and secured, ready for the inevitable crash?

What gives, seriously? Sometimes they are tucked underneath the seat or behind the backrest. Obviously if they were cut off before being sent here I get it but why are these people making "aesthetic alterations" that involve removing or otherwise making inaccessible the saftey features of the car?

Ralph Nader went through hell to make these vehicles a lot safer. It makes *no* sense to be ****ing with the seatbelts.
In the D.R., it's unsafe at any speed.
 

bachata

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Just got back from running errands and thought of something else. WHY in 40% of these ubers/indrives are the seatbelts or seabelt buckles tucked in, cut off or otherwise inaccessible? Especially when the driver has his seatbelt fastened and secured, ready for the inevitable crash?

What gives, seriously? Sometimes they are tucked underneath the seat or behind the backrest. Obviously if they were cut off before being sent here I get it but why are these people making "aesthetic alterations" that involve removing or otherwise making inaccessible the saftey features of the car?

Ralph Nader went through hell to make these vehicles a lot safer. It makes *no* sense to be ****ing with the seatbelts.
They don't care about passenger safety, the driver's seat belt are in proper operational condition because they are the only one required to use it.
I am talking about carros públicos, all Ubers and Taxi 🚖 I ride in DR are good condition and working seat belts.

JJ
 
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bachata

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When I was in the taxi business in DR I used to have a baby car seat on the third raw of seats of my minibus...
All seatbelts in good conditions!

JJ
 

nanita

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Jul 28, 2014
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How about plugging supermarket isles. Of course this also occurs with elderly who are unaware of their surroundings.

But young, and often ample in girth, Dominicans stand and block supermarket isles or sidewalks or door entrances.
They always find the point that creates the most congestion to stop and talk to a friend or uncle and are never in a hurry to uplug the blockage. They could care less about others inconvenience.

Yesterday I was a couple cars behind a dump truck who stopped in front of Sosua Beach to shoot the crap with another dump truck driver coming the other way while leaning out their driver's windows.

Despite horns honking and traffic piling up they decided it was a great time to discuss chicken and rice or their newest speaker install or whatever 'important' issue they wanted to jaw about.
Meanwhile everyone backed up did a slow burn.
IMO, the culture of the 'derecho ajeno' is not widely applied in the DR.

What is the 'derecho ajeno'? Loosely, it's the acknowledgement that others have rights you should respect. YES, EVEN if that person is not your socio and EVEN if that means you might have to modify your behaviour.

This flies in the face of many hot and spicy, ego- and emotion-driven cultures (sorry).

The 'derecho ajeno' is a concept that is drummed into Canadians from birth. For example, the other day at the supermarket there was a young dad with his young kids, and although the kids were in no way impeding my progress I overheard him say 'watch out, watch out' and the little guys scooted out of the way of my cart.

Canadians generally have their head on a swivel so they don't inconvenience others - differing views on personal space ALSO impact this IMO. For example, if you get up close and personal to a Dominican blocking your way and squeeze on through, that is NO PROBLEM for them.

Now it must be said that some Canadians are soulless automatons who are reflexively polite but not really nice AT ALL. While some Dominicans might irritate the crap out of you but also take the time to help you out of a jam. There are pros and cons to all cultures.
 

bob saunders

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IMO, the culture of the 'derecho ajeno' is not widely applied in the DR.

What is the 'derecho ajeno'? Loosely, it's the acknowledgement that others have rights you should respect. YES, EVEN if that person is not your socio and EVEN if that means you might have to modify your behaviour.

This flies in the face of many hot and spicy, ego- and emotion-driven cultures (sorry).

The 'derecho ajeno' is a concept that is drummed into Canadians from birth. For example, the other day at the supermarket there was a young dad with his young kids, and although the kids were in no way impeding my progress I overheard him say 'watch out, watch out' and the little guys scooted out of the way of my cart.

Canadians generally have their head on a swivel so they don't inconvenience others - differing views on personal space ALSO impact this IMO. For example, if you get up close and personal to a Dominican blocking your way and squeeze on through, that is NO PROBLEM for them.

Now it must be said that some Canadians are soulless automatons who are reflexively polite but not really nice AT ALL. While some Dominicans might irritate the crap out of you but also take the time to help you out of a jam. There are pros and cons to all cultures.
I raised my sons the same way my parents raised me. Open doors for other people, help older people....etc. All this is automatic reflex as you same for most of us Canadians, at least of my generation. My sons both tell that people often comment and thank them for helping them or opening doors. My younger son does it for almost everyone, regardless of age or sex. Neither of them likes to use the word sorry unless they really mean it though. There are lots of polite Dominicans.