Another good reason to live in RD

PeterInBrat

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It's all derived from our corn/soy based food chain. The problem is we really like cheap chicken and beef. A few folks can afford to pay $15 for an organic chicken, but in the meantime, you can get one roasted in the deli for $5..

This guy gets a premium for his livestock and he's raising them sustainably and humanely. It's a management intensive system, but requires very little outside inputs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsCRDNxIH4I
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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It's all derived from our corn/soy based food chain. The problem is we really like cheap chicken and beef. A few folks can afford to pay $15 for an organic chicken, but in the meantime, you can get one roasted in the deli for $5..

This guy gets a premium for his livestock and he's raising them sustainably and humanely. It's a management intensive system, but requires very little outside inputs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsCRDNxIH4I
I found the price of chicken 'back in the day' to be astounding - more than beef!!

Here is my friend who raises Texas Longhorns (the 1st in Canada to do it, believe it or not).. he's the only reason I know anything about the food chain - of which he is a major critic.

He ain't no normal plow jockey... full blown MBA who applies it to hands on agriculture.

Home

He claims that today's cattle are overdomesticated - a view shared by one of RD's premier cattle breeders here on the North Coast
 

PeterInBrat

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Haiti and the DR lost much with the swine fever massacre back in the 80s. Those creole pigs are better tasting, can forage on their own and more disease resistant than the "princess" pigs the US gave the island. I hear there are still some creoles around in the rural areas. Most livestock programs are trying to push the DR and Haiti into the factory farm concentrated feed lot systems of the US. It's not something a campesino can get into.
 

AlterEgo

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Haiti and the DR lost much with the swine fever massacre back in the 80s. Those creole pigs are better tasting, can forage on their own and more disease resistant than the "princess" pigs the US gave the island. I hear there are still some creoles around in the rural areas. Most livestock programs are trying to push the DR and Haiti into the factory farm concentrated feed lot systems of the US. It's not something a campesino can get into.
Thank you for steering this to the DR Peter - please keep it there or it won't be open long.
 

PeterInBrat

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There was a post not too long ago about a guy who was making millions exporting eggs from FL to Haiti, while eggs from the DR were banned due to "Avian Flu." Someone with that kind of income prob knows what hands need to be greased...

Haitians are lucky if they can get one egg a month.
 

william webster

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Thank you for steering this to the DR Peter - please keep it there or it won't be open long.
this all about the better quality of RD food/meat.....

VERY RD, if you don't mind me saying so

Another reason to live in the DR...Better health prospects,
Atlantic City ain't got this !!

What more could you ask for ??

I started in the Off Topic and thought better of it.

THe Chamber of Commerce endorses this thread.........:squareeye
 

PeterInBrat

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The DR has been moving more and more to CFL meat/dairy production. I remember on one of my first trips to the DR the butter, chicken and bacon all had more flavor than the stuff in the US. It wasn't that much different the last time I was there except the chicken was more scrawny. Worst eggs in the US are the bulk ones you can get at Walmart nowadays. No flavor and no color..



My mom used to get local grass raised eggs for about $3 a dozen. Very nice, but almost too much flavor. Bright deep orange yolks and the shells were often blue/green.
 

william webster

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If we just had a few farmers who could support this thread..... campesinos, where are you?

Ringo gone off the end ?? He farms........
 

Matilda

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Campesino Matilda here. We have our own chickens and fresh eggs. There is simply no comparison. When you drop them in boiling water to make a poached egg the white doesn't move - stays close to the yoke. And the taste is fabulous.

Matilda
 

PeterInBrat

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In the DR, produce is cheap and processed food is pricey. Fresh basil sells for $10-$16/pound in the US. In the DR it's what, a buck? A nice sized papaya is $4-$5 IF you can find one. Yeah there are some things that are hard to get, like decent red onions and carrots, but there are plenty of deals. Oranges, limes, bananas, eggplant..
 

william webster

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gracias Matilda
we who travel back/forth frequently lament the food products 'off the shelf' in NoAmerica but truly appreciate what we all have here..

eggs, meat, produce,,,,, exceptional quality, freshness annd taste

Want to talk juices ?? even better
Florida can't hold a candle.

I should start to plan my 100th birthday party...
 

william webster

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don't get me wrong -- this can be had in Canada and the US (I expect) but you need to hunt

My beef in Canada is grass fed, pork = family raised farm, produce all Farmers' Market stuff
But the season is short.

Short season = high prices,
not for everybody as we have here ---
 

AlterEgo

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In the DR, produce is cheap and processed food is pricey. Fresh basil sells for $10-$16/pound in the US. In the DR it's what, a buck? A nice sized papaya is $4-$5 IF you can find one. Yeah there are some things that are hard to get, like decent red onions and carrots, but there are plenty of deals. Oranges, limes, bananas, eggplant..
I've heard that comment about onions before, and it always baffled me. Then last week I found out that we live in the onion-raising capital of DR, red onions EVERYWHERE. You can buy them loose, but most of the time they're sold along the road on stands, with the greens still attached, in bunches. Usually 40 pesos or so.
 

AlterEgo

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this all about the better quality of RD food/meat.....

VERY RD, if you don't mind me saying so

Another reason to live in the DR...Better health prospects,
Atlantic City ain't got this !!

What more could you ask for ??

I started in the Off Topic and thought better of it.

THe Chamber of Commerce endorses this thread.........:squareeye
are you 'over-puppied' AE?...

not to worry, we'll monitor ourselves :))
Getting feisty in your old age, huh???? I have a whole COLLECTION of wooden spoons here in DR.

As regards Atlantic City, haven't been there since December, and don't miss it a bit.

As far as the puppies, it's been rough. One was still born first night. Today - two days later - she gave birth to two HUGE pups, one male and one female, neither made it. I was hand feeding one little guy who was struggling, and I lost him this afternoon. As I said, rough.

So don't **** me off.
 

PeterInBrat

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I've seen plenty of red onions, but nothing big enough to make onion rings out of. I was looking for 3"-4" ones. I prefer the red ones for the rings because they are a bit sweeter. I was in Sosua, so maybe we got the seconds. Most of what I saw was about the size of American limes and a little bigger. With carrots, they tended to be too big, what we call in the restaurant business "Horse Carrots."
 

AlterEgo

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We get the really big red onions here in the southwest - apparently Palenque/Najayo is famous for them. Who knew?

Not that I know how to make onion rings........

I can certainly identify with the horse carrots.
 

Xavier_Onassis

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I have heard that the giant carrots are grown in the US, but are processed to make what are called "baby carrots" and sold at a higher price. We get carrots here from local FL farms part of the year and from Ontario, New Brunswick and PEI Canada as well. They are bugs bunny style carrots around 6 to 10 inches long and pretty cheap.

I have not noticed a difference in flavor between these and the horse carrots of the DR, which I have also eaten. They sell those here in the Opa-Locka Hialeah Flea Market, a great place for veggies. Bell peppers that sell for $2.69 a pound in the supermarkets sell four or five for a dollar there.