Are kids in Private Schools in DR always so loud?!

KJS73

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I just started teaching 7th grade in Santo Domingo. For the most part I really like it, but at times I get so frustrated with how hard it is to keep class quiet. For awhile they will get quiet and then start back up again. It's as if it is impossible for them to not talk. Is this a common phenomena with 7th graders in general or is it more of a DR private school thing.

Overall though I like the kids. They aren't mean spirited. It's just there loudness makes it hard to focus and teach a lesson.
 

caribmike

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Jul 9, 2009
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I just started teaching 7th grade in Santo Domingo. For the most part I really like it, but at times I get so frustrated with how hard it is to keep class quiet. For awhile they will get quiet and then start back up again. It's as if it is impossible for them to not talk. Is this a common phenomena with 7th graders in general or is it more of a DR private school thing.

Overall though I like the kids. They aren't mean spirited. It's just there loudness makes it hard to focus and teach a lesson.
No, it is a DOMINICAN thing in general, lol
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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just go back in your memory to the happy times when you were at school :)
kids in packs are always loud like a bunch of little monkeys :) teaching ain't a job for a faint-hearted.
 

KJS73

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Well I think I just need to accept it and learn to work with it. They do get quiet when I give tests. I threaten to take away points if they talk.
 

Givadogahome

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I think it is part and parcel of teaching and the teachers ability to control the class. I would think it might take a while to get to know what works with them, but it must be super difficult in DR. Asking a Dominican to quieten down is like asking the rest of us to stop breathing.:nervous:
 

bob saunders

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If they were not disciplined to stay quite through Grades 1 to 6 is will be hard to get them to be quite in Grade seven, however they are at the age where you can reason with them. My wife has no problem, just a look from her stops them.
 

KJS73

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I have noticed that the looking at them sternly in silence is one of the things I've tried that works. When I yell it seems to just excite them, as I've become louder than them.
 

Givadogahome

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What discipline are you allowed to deal out? I'm not suggesting you start knee capping your kids, just interested if you have a disciplinary guidebook when teaching in DR, a line you are told not to cross?
 

donP

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Low Voice

I have noticed that the looking at them sternly in silence is one of the things I've tried that works. When I yell it seems to just excite them, as I've become louder than them.
Don't ever yell.
You'll lose, they can always be louder than you. :bunny:

What I used to do is lower my voice but kept on teaching.
There were always some who'd tell others to shut up then, not me.

It did work in civilization.... :rolleyes:

Well, many years ago. ;)


donP
 

KJS73

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What discipline are you allowed to deal out? I'm not suggesting you start knee capping your kids, just interested if you have a disciplinary guidebook when teaching in DR, a line you are told not to cross?
I'm still waiting for a manual for conduct. I've kind of just been thrown in the classroom. Though I'm not complianing. I'm very grateful for the job, but there indeed is little guidance for a brand new teacher like me. I'm basically learning as I go and asking other teachers for advice.

What keeps me going is that I enjoy reading English Literature and some of the kids really respond to my teaching and are doing quite well.
 

Hillbilly

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Jan 1, 2002
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The "Look" is important.
Grades are a carrot and a stick
They are not your friends. They are to be taught. Teach. Grade. Be innovative. create games that force them to learn, but quietly.

What are you teaching???

Do not let them gain the upper hand. You must be firm, smile, and fail them if they are not quiet.
Alert them that habits learned in 7th will carry over to 8 and beyond. And in good colleges, it does not matter who Mami and Papi are, but whether they can learn the material. Those that do, triumph; those that don't, FAIL..

HB
 
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Are you teaching in a Dominican school or an international school? That might make a difference in the reasons this is happening on several levels. But, the solutions are the same. Good teachers manage students similarly.

Don't smile (much) and do be strict for a couple of months. Once you gain respect and adherence to your rules, you can loosen up.

You don't need to be a friend to the students. You DO need to be their teacher and be held accountable for what goes on in your class and what they learn.

Be clear about your expectations. Give them in writing, so if you need to talk to the parents you are covered.

Don't ever yell or become angry. When you do that, you have put yourself on a lower level. Be firm and clear and fair. Show that you have high expectations, but you also care. And be consistent.

Good luck. It will get easier. But getting off to a good start sets the classroom climate for the entire school year.

Lindsey
 

prospero

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As a CMS alumnus I can confidently tell you that there's very little you can do about that. They are loud, spoilt, abrasive and self-centred. Some of it will wear-off with time, most of it will stay. The worrying thing is that these private school brats WILL eventually be the ones who are running the country, inherited from the business and government traditions of their families. Salt of the earth, eh?
 

dv8

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on few occasions when i had a class full of kids they did tend to be rather quiet. i think i have a face that makes kids ask themselves a question: do i feel lucky?
well, do ya?
 

Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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Yeah, you have to master the look! If you get your class under control, you won't need to talk that much for discipline. I bet that If you were able to see the same classroom with different teachers you will see that they don't behave the same with all of them. It's all about what they think they can get away with!

You can also see kids who prioritize their homework. They don't really care about not doing certain assigment but you'll see them really worried about turning in some other assignment on time because "you don't mess with that teacher", or "that teacher is no easy".

Sometimes students talk because they feel unengaged. Pick one of those students who can't seem to keep quiet and give him/her a project or a task. Maybe to help you with the attendance list, be your assistant for the day, or even to help with discipline. Even though it may sound like a contradiction, most of the time these students tend to have followers who will do what they do or what they say. Sometimes this works as motivation and can make a difference in the class environment. You can actually get to know who is/are the one(s) who have the most effect on the rest of the class. Don't forget to praise them when they do a great job!

There are always students who finish their tasks really quicky. Make sure you have extra activities or exercises for them.

Kids need to know that you don't give a damn who their daddy is, that you are not afraid to fail someone if you have to.

When you make a promise or a threat make sure you do what you said you would.

Try to get help and guidance from some other more experienced teachers. I bet they'll be glad to tell you what has worked or hasn't worked with them.
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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a study of schools in Latin America showed that almost 20% of actual classroom time is wasted in trying to maintain classroom discipline. i am going to find the article, which i have in my collection of working papers, and post a link. so, my young teacher, welcome to the wonderful world of the classroom, Latin style.
 

Tom F.

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As a long time teacher of recent immigrants, mostly from the DR, in NYC; all the advice is good. You get better every year as a teacher. Be stern, let the students know you care about them, show passion in your teaching, and have consequence for inappropriate behavior. With all the new technology, you can walk around the classroom with a smart phone or an ipad and give participation points either positive or negative and let it impact their grade. I have found with my students that it has to impact their grade otherwise not a lot of effort comes forth from the less motivated.