Are you thinking about switching to electric cars in the DR?

SKY

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Apr 11, 2004
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Nacional in Punta Cana has two self service charging stations in the parking lot.
 

HS10

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Feb 17, 2008
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Hyundai Ioniq 5 is getting very good reviews....and Hyundai is very popular here and a great vehicle ...so maybe they will import it.​

I want my next vehicle to be electric primarily because it has 90% fewer moving parts.
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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Tesla super charge stations are 15 minutes once you are hooked up.
Sounds fast until you consider that's about double a gasoline fillup.
And most charge points aren't supercharge sites.
If you are going to Santo Domingo and the hotel has a charge station that is open all night you are good. But since most hotels only have a couple spaces now as EV cars proliferate competition for chargers will get fierce.
Imagine pulling into a hotel parking lot and finding the charging stations occupied by vehicles that were left charging by owners who plugged them in and went to bed.
 
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windeguy

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So far I haven't seen a charging setup with only one station. They've all had at least two.
I see. That will make a huge difference when there are hundreds of chargers and thousands upon thousands of E-Cars.
And two are plugged in over night.
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
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I see. That will make a huge difference when there are hundreds of chargers and thousands upon thousands of E-Cars.
And two are plugged in over night.
I think the management of the charging stations is going to be a major issue in any case. I also think low cost home charging stations are just around the corner.
 
Jan 9, 2004
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I think the management of the charging stations is going to be a major issue in any case. I also think low cost home charging stations are just around the corner.
Three points.

1. Quality home charging systems (Level 2) are now under $2,000 installed and the price continues to drop;

2. Having brought in 20 Nissan Leafs this year for a tourist project, I have been informed, via the owner of the project, that the politicos are already dividing up the country for charger installations and the jockeying as to whether they will be allowed at gas stations/propane stations (many owned by politicos) has begun.

3. The vast majority of daily driving does not require an intra day "fill up."


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

malko

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Jan 12, 2013
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Imagine pulling into a hotel parking lot and finding the charging stations occupied by vehicles that were left charging by owners who plugged them in and went to bed.

I can imagine parking spots, especially in hotels, being " wireless" chargers in themselves sometime in the near future.

After that maybe even the major road axes, and such.


Also, perhaps back home, not having a home charger is a possibility, but here in the DR EV dealers would be silly not to have packs EV+ home charger + ,perhaps sometime soon, solar home charger as the standard offer.
 

windeguy

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I think the management of the charging stations is going to be a major issue in any case. I also think low cost home charging stations are just around the corner.
For the thousands of cars parked on the streets in Santo Domingo, Santiago, etc?

I can see the extension chords running from the houses over the sidewalk now.
 
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CristoRey

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Also, perhaps back home, not having a home charger is a possibility, but here in the DR EV dealers would be silly not to have packs EV+ home charger + ,perhaps sometime soon, solar home charger as the standard offer.
Are these home chargers connected to the home's electricity? If so how much of an increase would this add to the homeowner's monthy electric bill?
Where is homeowner's electricity coming from? Wind, solar, coal?
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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I can imagine parking spots, especially in hotels, being " wireless" chargers in themselves sometime in the near future.

After that maybe even the major road axes, and such.


Also, perhaps back home, not having a home charger is a possibility, but here in the DR EV dealers would be silly not to have packs EV+ home charger + ,perhaps sometime soon, solar home charger as the standard offer.

True, and there is a dealer selling electric cars in SD that is offering a home charging station as part of the purchase price of the vehicle.

IIRC, we had a conversation about them some time back.
 
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windeguy

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I can imagine parking spots, especially in hotels, being " wireless" chargers in themselves sometime in the near future.

After that maybe even the major road axes, and such.


Also, perhaps back home, not having a home charger is a possibility, but here in the DR EV dealers would be silly not to have packs EV+ home charger + ,perhaps sometime soon, solar home charger as the standard offer.
Note the wireless airgap is in the 1 foot range from the car, at least you won't need an opening for a physical plug connection on the car, but you still have to run the chord over the broken sidewalk in Santo Traffickjam.

November 21, 2021

To make electric vehicle charging even easier than filling up a car with gas, ORNL researchers have demonstrated a range of wireless charging solutions for stationary vehicles and are nearing completion of a new system to charge EVs while they’re in motion.
Electrifying transportation is at the top of the list for solutions to decarbonize the American economy. The transportation sector is the largest source of greenhouse gases in the nation, with cars and light trucks alone accounting for 60 percent of emissions. DOE has supported a range of research to make EV ownership more convenient and less costly for consumers, including the goal of a charge time of 15 minutes or less.
With custom magnetic coils, silicon carbide-based power electronics, novel controls and shielding technology to handle stray emissions, ORNL scientists have proven they can wirelessly charge both a light-duty passenger car across a six-inch airgap and a medium-duty delivery truck across an 11-inch airgap at the 20-kilowatt level at greater than 92 percent power transfer efficiency — on par with a wired system. They can even flow power in both directions, enabling vehicles to serve as energy storage.
The researchers have successfully demonstrated a 120 kW wireless charging system with 97 percent efficiency and are planning to install higher voltage systems, up to 270 kW, on passenger vehicles to meet or exceed the 15-minute charging goal.

 
Jan 9, 2004
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Note the wireless airgap is in the 1 foot range from the car, at least you won't need an opening for a physical plug connection on the car, but you still have to run the chord over the broken sidewalk in Santo Traffickjam.

November 21, 2021

To make electric vehicle charging even easier than filling up a car with gas, ORNL researchers have demonstrated a range of wireless charging solutions for stationary vehicles and are nearing completion of a new system to charge EVs while they’re in motion.
Electrifying transportation is at the top of the list for solutions to decarbonize the American economy. The transportation sector is the largest source of greenhouse gases in the nation, with cars and light trucks alone accounting for 60 percent of emissions. DOE has supported a range of research to make EV ownership more convenient and less costly for consumers, including the goal of a charge time of 15 minutes or less.
With custom magnetic coils, silicon carbide-based power electronics, novel controls and shielding technology to handle stray emissions, ORNL scientists have proven they can wirelessly charge both a light-duty passenger car across a six-inch airgap and a medium-duty delivery truck across an 11-inch airgap at the 20-kilowatt level at greater than 92 percent power transfer efficiency — on par with a wired system. They can even flow power in both directions, enabling vehicles to serve as energy storage.
The researchers have successfully demonstrated a 120 kW wireless charging system with 97 percent efficiency and are planning to install higher voltage systems, up to 270 kW, on passenger vehicles to meet or exceed the 15-minute charging goal.

Wireless charging has been, and still is, in the experimental stage. A company I am familiar with, WiTriCity https://witricity.com/, has been at it for well over a decade. Another company Plugless Power does have wireless charging panels in trials, but it is still a ways into the future before it could ever scale.

Additionally, companies are experimenting with replacing the sunroof on vehicles with a solar panel for charging both in stationary and on the go........provided of course there is enough sunlight. The downfall has been how much actual charging takes place against the associated costs.

Futurists envision these charging panels being incorporated in new road construction in a sort of charge as you drive system.

Whatever takes place and when, governments/countries are going to need to replace lost gas tax revenue..............the DR included. You can then expect you will be charged a tax for every EV mile you drive. Transponders will likely be fitted and retrofitted into EV's sending signals to monitor the mileage driven, whether on a so called "charging highway" and then taxed appropriately.

For those worried about Big Brother having more data about your movements.....................this will not sit well. But take heart, a whole series of technology will likely come about to thwart that monitoring and/or evade the new "energy" taxes.................


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 
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chico bill

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I can imagine parking spots, especially in hotels, being " wireless" chargers in themselves sometime in the near future.

After that maybe even the major road axes, and such.


Also, perhaps back home, not having a home charger is a possibility, but here in the DR EV dealers would be silly not to have packs EV+ home charger + ,perhaps sometime soon, solar home charger as the standard offer.
Wireless car charging ? You do have a vivid imagination.
Imagine the amount of power that would take to and magnetic coils placed by Haitians in parking spaces in the supermarket.
Next imagine this One of the Ede electrical providers is in charge of your getting around.
I see two chargers in Playero and Super Pola.
How long do you shop for groceries?
So if you are in their for 15 minutes you can go and extra 10 miles.
Or maybe you can go to Playero, plug in you EV and go drinking all day and come back to a fully charged car some 5 hours later to drive home drunk
 
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chico bill

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Use these approximate calculations based on a 240V Level 2 power source and charging capacity, according to the manufacturers’ websites for the following 2021 cars:

  • Chevrolet Volt EV: 10 hours
  • Nissan Leaf: Up to 11 hours
  • Tesla Model S: 12 hours
  • Karma GS-6: 4 hours
  • Tesla Model 3: 12 hours
  • Porsche Taycan: Up to 10.5 hours
  • Mini SE Hardtop: 4 hours
  • Audi E-Tron: 10 hours
  • Polestar 2: 8 hours
  • BMW i3: 7 hours

EV Charging Levels (most commercial locations are Level 2)

There are three general types of electric car charging: Level 1 (a regular old 120-volt three-prong power outlet), Level 2 (a 240-volt power outlet, or car charger), and Level 3 (a “fast-charging” station).

Here’s a rough estimate of how many miles you can get at each type of EV charger:

  • Level 1: About 5 miles of added range per hour of charging
  • Level 2: About 25 miles of added range per hour of charging
  • Level 3: About 200 miles of added range per hour of charging

So unless you plug your car into that Hotel Level 2 charging point and leave it all night you may not be getting back to Las Terrenas from SD
 
Jan 9, 2004
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Use these approximate calculations based on a 240V Level 2 power source and charging capacity, according to the manufacturers’ websites for the following 2021 cars:

  • Chevrolet Volt EV: 10 hours
  • Nissan Leaf: Up to 11 hours
  • Tesla Model S: 12 hours
  • Karma GS-6: 4 hours
  • Tesla Model 3: 12 hours
  • Porsche Taycan: Up to 10.5 hours
  • Mini SE Hardtop: 4 hours
  • Audi E-Tron: 10 hours
  • Polestar 2: 8 hours
  • BMW i3: 7 hours

EV Charging Levels (most commercial locations are Level 2)

There are three general types of electric car charging: Level 1 (a regular old 120-volt three-prong power outlet), Level 2 (a 240-volt power outlet, or car charger), and Level 3 (a “fast-charging” station).

Here’s a rough estimate of how many miles you can get at each type of EV charger:

  • Level 1: About 5 miles of added range per hour of charging
  • Level 2: About 25 miles of added range per hour of charging
  • Level 3: About 200 miles of added range per hour of charging

So unless you plug your car into that Hotel Level 2 charging point and leave it all night you may not be getting back to Las Terrenas from SD
You may not even need to charge at all in SD..........depending on the range of your vehicle and its installed battery capacity. Using the highway it would be approximately 100 miles. More than enough range for a round trip without charging on the newer EV's.

And those charging times are from empty to full. How many people will run it to empty? Probably the same as those who run a conventional ICE vehicle to empty.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 
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