Aunque

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Chris_NJ

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Dec 17, 2003
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It seems that "aunque" is followed by the subjunctive tense of a verb and sometimes by the regular present tense other times. Is there a rule that dictates which tense is used when and if the meaning of "aunque" changes with the different conjugation.

Just something I am wondering.
 

Bugsey34

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"Aunque" usually takes the subjunctive because it expresses an uncertainty. In this case it can be translated as "even if". An example is Aunque estes muy gordo, te amo para siempre.

However, "aunque" can also mean even though, which is an expression of certainty, something that has definitely happened, in which case you don't need the subjunctive. An example would be "Aunque llegamos tarde, vimos casi toda la pelicula."
 

juancarlos

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Bugsey34 said:
"Aunque" usually takes the subjunctive because it expresses an uncertainty. In this case it can be translated as "even if". An example is Aunque estes muy gordo, te amo para siempre.

However, "aunque" can also mean even though, which is an expression of certainty, something that has definitely happened, in which case you don't need the subjunctive. An example would be "Aunque llegamos tarde, vimos casi toda la pelicula."
You are right! Good examples.
 

Ricardo900

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Jul 12, 2004
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Hate to be a stickler, but this is spanish 101

Bugsey34 said:
"Aunque" usually takes the subjunctive because it expresses an uncertainty. In this case it can be translated as "even if". An example is Aunque estes muy gordo, te amo para siempre.

However, "aunque" can also mean even though, which is an expression of certainty, something that has definitely happened, in which case you don't need the subjunctive. An example would be "Aunque llegamos tarde, vimos casi toda la pelicula."
I think its eres and not estes and lleg?ramos past tense "We arrived"
 

Bugsey34

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Nope, "gordo" is a physical condition, so the auxiliary verb is "estar."

And "lleg?ramos" is the past tense of the subjunctive, the imperfect subjunctive. That's the point of what I was saying, when you're talking about an action that has already definitely occurred, "aunque" does not require the subjunctive. That is why in that example the verb is in the preterite form, "llegamos."
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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Ser gordo/a and estar gordo/a are both correct, depending on whether the condition is temporary or permanent. :)

In the example Bugsey used, either could have applied, but estar sounds better that ser - "aunque seas muy gordo..."
 
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