Bars Close at 9 PM Tonight (May 19)

Ken

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Jan 1, 2002
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From today's Sosua News:

[h=5]From Saturday 9 PM, for 24 hours there may not be sold any alcoholic beverages in bars, restaurants, discotheques and night clubs.[/h][h=5]This strict regulation is promulgated by the government and the police will strictly check for compliance. The government hopes to avoid riots during the elections on Sunday for a new president. The supporters of the different parties can get pretty heated when they encounter each other in the polling stations. In the course of Monday, the results of the election shall be revealed, and then the supporters of the winning party will go through the streets singing, honking and celebrating the victory.[/h]
 

Robert

Stay Frosty!
Jan 2, 1999
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dr1.com
As covered in yesterdays DR1 News :)

Ban on booze wont affect all the election socializing

Stock up on alcohol for drinking on Saturday and Sunday because all day Saturday and until 9pm on Sunday, stores, restaurants/bars are banned from selling liquor. The Central Electoral Board (JCE) reminded Dominicans that Article 109 of the Electoral Law establishes the ban.

Expect friends and family to gather on Sunday evening until late Monday night to await the electoral results. Many a sancocho or barbecue is planned for friends and family to meet to await the first bulletin announced to be before 9pm. The vote closes at 6pm.

Take note that there is an important social component that encourages voters. Every four years, hundreds of voters who travel home to vote will meet up with old neighbors and friends they may not have seen in years. And politics has been so much part of Dominican life for the past months. All finally climaxes on elections day.

The JCE also reminded Dominicans that the electoral law bans the celebration of public shows or meetings of any kind 24 hours before the election. This means there will be no shows this weekend, and Sunday is a national holiday.

Dominicans get a respite from the campaign tonight, Friday 18 May at midnight. There is a ban on political campaigning all day Saturday and on elections day itself, Sunday 20 May.
 

Jumbo

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Jul 8, 2005
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So Sosua gets an extra day? Can hotels like Coco, New Garden Don Antonio ect, still sell booze at their private establishments.

The flaw i find in this stupid law is that people will not stock up on beer but Brugal and Johny Walker putting more fuel on the fire. No matter how much booze you buy for a party in the DR it is never enough. More fights will break out when it runs out or there is little left. Don't be suprised to see more people killed over booze than politics..............
 

SKY

Gold
Apr 11, 2004
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The AI Hotels are not included, you can get all the booze you want there.
 

belgiank

Silver
Jun 13, 2009
3,251
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Can the hookers still work, or do they also have to take the day off to go and vote?

If so, Pedro Clisante will be dead for the weekend... no booze and no hookers... whoehaaaa

BelgianK

PS... just joking, but I was at Janet's earlier today, and a lot of locals were stacking up on booze... very usefull law... lol
 

Ducadista

Member
Nov 7, 2011
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Valeu Cara!
OHHH, the irony of DR campaning, during the campaign, Partidos would give out free beer and booze, but now they want to be strict, and bar alcohol. Its ok to get you "happy" during my campaign, but ohhhhh no, not when you go to the voting booth, you need to remember what picture I paid you to vote for. Riduculo !!
 

Ken

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
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. Its ok to get you "happy" during my campaign, but ohhhhh no, not when you go to the voting booth, you need to remember what picture I paid you to vote for. Riduculo !!
That's not the reason. The hope is to cut down on the number shootings between member of rival parties and demonstrations that go out of control.
 

Seamonkey

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Oct 6, 2009
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Again Sosua News has misleading information. The ban started this morning (saturday) at 9am and lasts until 9pm Sunday.The Politure and Nacional police were walking Pedro Clisante all day looking for establishments selling alcohol and shut down those that were breaking the law.


From today's Sosua News:

[h=5]From Saturday 9 PM, for 24 hours there may not be sold any alcoholic beverages in bars, restaurants, discotheques and night clubs.[/h][h=5]This strict regulation is promulgated by the government and the police will strictly check for compliance. The government hopes to avoid riots during the elections on Sunday for a new president. The supporters of the different parties can get pretty heated when they encounter each other in the polling stations. In the course of Monday, the results of the election shall be revealed, and then the supporters of the winning party will go through the streets singing, honking and celebrating the victory.[/h]
 

whiddons

New member
Dec 19, 2010
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As of 5pm today (Saturday) Cabarete's restaurants seemed to be operating as normal.... Gin on the rocks and Presidentes were served a plenty to our party of 5 beachside and in full view.
 
Mar 2, 2008
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Again Sosua News has misleading information. The ban started this morning (saturday) at 9am and lasts until 9pm Sunday.The Politure and Nacional police were walking Pedro Clisante all day looking for establishments selling alcohol and shut down those that were breaking the law.
Yup, Seamonkey has it right. The police and military were out in force all day. I took walks this morning and this evening. This evening Sosua looked like a ghost town. No one was on the streets and most bars were closed. there were a few exceptions, Rocky's being one of them.

Rocky's, being classified a hotel, was allowed to stay open AND to serve alcohol. I certainly understand the value of that designation now. Tonight was movie night at Rocky's, and they usual suspects were all there, enjoying the beverage of their choice and watching a very decent movie, "Source Code".

After the movie I went for a stroll around town with a friend, and most bars were closed all together. Those that were open, like Cafe Cubano, had a few patrons, and no one was served any alcoholic beverages. There was a completely different feel to the town. It was very quiet and still. Actually, it was kind of a nice change, but I wouldn't want to own a bar or restaurant under those conditions. It must be extremely difficult to make up that loss of business, especially during low season.

In any event, it was a worthwhile experience to observe this unique way of managing a very emotional period of time. Singularly Dominican, to say the least.

I will be taking a trip to Santo Domingo this coming Monday, and it will be even more interesting to see how the results of the election will reflect on the behaviors of the population of that city. The DR is nothing if not interesting.