Buying a motoconcho...

C

Chip00

Guest
Does anyone know what the average price would be used or new....Thanks !
BTW the term is "motor" - a motoconcho is the fellow who rides the motorcycle.

It will depend on the name brand. The standard Honda 90 will cost in the around RD30 new, whereas the offbrand ones will be less. I would avoid this type as there are too slow for highway travel.

The other faster types are the 4 stroke 125 types and they are all off brands and can be had for upwards of RD40.

The creme de la creme is the Yamaha two stroke 115 and they will be in the mid RD60's.

I have one and I even took it with the wife to PP over the mountains from Santiago.

As far as used prices - good luck. Dominicans have the nasty habit of trying to sell used things at almost original cost even though the item appears .. uhem.., un poco acabado!

Go for a new one. I know where you can get a good deal on one in Moca if you want to know. I'm friends with the owner.
 
C

Chip00

Guest
When you say RD30, you meaning 30 000 pesos right ? and 60000 pesos right ?
Yup

For latest up to date prices call Pancho Motores in Moca at (809) 822-0277, ask for Ramon and tell him Chip sent you. He'll give you a rundown on the prices. They are open until like 4 pm.
 

Me_again

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Nov 21, 2004
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"BTW the term is "motor" - a motoconcho is the fellow who rides the motorcycle."

Really a motoconchista is the driver, the motoconcho is the bike used for hire, and moto is closer to the pronunciation of the short form of the bike either private or for hire.
 

Criss Colon

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A Word To The Wise,BEFORE You Buy!!

This sounds like a Dominican has given you the idea to buy a motorcycle that he will use to make you both a lot of money! He will drive it and you will split the money. If that is the case,DON"T DO IT!!!!
You will never see any money,and the "Moto" will be stolen,read: Given away to a family member in the Campo,or just sold!
If I am wrong,and it is for your personal use,I would like to take out a 1,000,000 life/dismemberment insurance policy on you!
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canadian bob

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Jan 16, 2002
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Bike thefts..

. Are they stolen very often here?[/QUOTE]
How about every day unless you use a 1 in chain attached to something immovable using a super strong padlock that can't be opened with a piece of re-bar & a rock! Good luck! Canadian Bob.
 

Rocky

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Apr 4, 2002
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As CC points out, buying a bike for someone to concho, is not only a bad idea, it's virtually a guarantee that you'll lose your money.
As for the correct terms, a "motor" is proper "Dominican" when referring to a motorbike.
A bike used to carry the public around for a fee, is a motoconcho, and the driver is a motoconchista.
As mentioned, buying a used one is almost certainly going to be a rip off.
The likelihood of a "motoconcho" type bike getting stolen, if a gringo buys one, is somewhere between high and extremely high.
The more common the vehicle, the more it gets stolen.

If someone decides to buy any type of motorbike for transport in this country, he/she should be a real biker to start off with.
If you are able to drive, that's not enough.
You have to be a true experienced biker, or you're going to get hurt.
If you are a true biker and decide to buy a bike here, then start inventing special ways to prevent it from getting stolen, and/or ways of having it blow up underneath the thief.
 

paradise07

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Jan 6, 2007
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Thanks for the advice...

We are going to be in the DR for 2 months and just thought that maybe would could save some money on taxis and moto(r)conchos....but with the previously posted advice...I am thinking that it is not such a hot idea....
 

jrzyguy

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May 5, 2004
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i think it all depends where you plan on traveling. I have seen many tourists rent motos for a few weeks and putt around town. Driving is not all that bad...just have to remember that red lights dont mean a thing and that the street sign Una Via means nothing.

I think my bigger concern would be keeping the thing safe from theft. My dominican friend who has his own moto was always able to bring it in to the hotel property so it was safe when he was visiting me.
 

Squat

Tropical geek in Las Terrenas
Jan 1, 2002
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Driving is not all that bad...
I don't want to sound negative, but about 4 days ago, an american lady from Las Terrenas lost control of her motorbike, and crashed into a coconut tree head first (without helmet). She suffered sever head damage, was in intensive care in Nagua, and finally flew back to the USA against all doctor's advice...
It saddened all of us down here, and kind of makes me wonder about advising newcomers on riding motorbikes...
 

jrzyguy

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May 5, 2004
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I don't want to sound negative, but about 4 days ago, an american lady from Las Terrenas lost control of her motorbike, and crashed into a coconut tree head first (without helmet). She suffered sever head damage, was in intensive care in Nagua, and finally flew back to the USA against all doctor's advice...
It saddened all of us down here, and kind of makes me wonder about advising newcomers on riding motorbikes...
Ok..i am with you on that one squat. Honestly...i wouldnt want to drive a moto here in nyc..so why would i want to do so while in the DR? Guaguas are my mode of transporation while travleling from different places in DR..

Sorry to hear about the lady in Las Terrenas...but losing control and crashing into a tree could happen here in nyc...but it would be a lamp post instead....but in nyc you would be required to wear a helmet. Not to sound insensative...but this sounds like an accident that could happen to anyone and anywhere.

I will say this tho. I notice that many of my friends in the DR have scars on their legs etc...and when i ask how they got them they say "en moto".
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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I've been seriously riding bikes since I was 16, nearly 39 years now. Even I'd be paranoid while riding in the DR (paranoia is a fine trait while riding a bike.

Yes, the roads are REALLY bad for bikes. But what's worse are the other drivers out there-they just don't care about anything around them-especially concho drivers. All those motos and concho's got the crap beat out of them for a reason.

The ~average~ US/Canadian/European rider just isn't well prepared for riding a bike in the DR. The *casual* rider is definitely not.
 

fightingirish

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Dec 8, 2005
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Im knocking on wood as I type this. I hope these are not famous last words! ;)

One day last year I couldnt climb into one more carro publico without losing my sanity, so I bought a Yamaha 125. Everything I read on these boards advised against it. I had NEVER owned a bike before and learned to ride it here in Santo Domingo -- the capital of crazy drivers.

I locked it with two cables and tried to keep an eye on it. I didnt drive it drunk and I drove defensively. I had some minor scrapes with oblivious drivers, but nothing serious. It was a lot of fun. No traffic jams, no need for air-conditioning, no sweating in guaguas and no bankruptcy buying gas for an SUV.

So I just want to state for the record -- it can be done.

And Ive since done something more suicidal -- Ive traded up to an italian superbike. The 125 was nice, but there's nothing like getting on Las Americas or Autopista Duarte and really moving.

Is it foolhardy? Maybe, but it's also a helluva lotta fun.

So that is just the other side of the story.
 

Rocky

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Apr 4, 2002
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Im knocking on wood as I type this. I hope these are not famous last words! ;)

One day last year I couldnt climb into one more carro publico without losing my sanity, so I bought a Yamaha 125. Everything I read on these boards advised against it. I had NEVER owned a bike before and learned to ride it here in Santo Domingo -- the capital of crazy drivers.

I locked it with two cables and tried to keep an eye on it. I didnt drive it drunk and I drove defensively. I had some minor scrapes with oblivious drivers, but nothing serious. It was a lot of fun. No traffic jams, no need for air-conditioning, no sweating in guaguas and no bankruptcy buying gas for an SUV.

So I just want to state for the record -- it can be done.

And Ive since done something more suicidal -- Ive traded up to an italian superbike. The 125 was nice, but there's nothing like getting on Las Americas or Autopista Duarte and really moving.

Is it foolhardy? Maybe, but it's also a helluva lotta fun.

So that is just the other side of the story.
Being well forewarned and having the correct driving attitude is invaluable.
Cobraboy's advice is a great generalization.
There can always be exceptions to the rule.
May you always keep the rubber side down.
 
C

Chip00

Guest
Im knocking on wood as I type this. I hope these are not famous last words! ;)

One day last year I couldnt climb into one more carro publico without losing my sanity, so I bought a Yamaha 125. Everything I read on these boards advised against it. I had NEVER owned a bike before and learned to ride it here in Santo Domingo -- the capital of crazy drivers.

I locked it with two cables and tried to keep an eye on it. I didnt drive it drunk and I drove defensively. I had some minor scrapes with oblivious drivers, but nothing serious. It was a lot of fun. No traffic jams, no need for air-conditioning, no sweating in guaguas and no bankruptcy buying gas for an SUV.

So I just want to state for the record -- it can be done.

And Ive since done something more suicidal -- Ive traded up to an italian superbike. The 125 was nice, but there's nothing like getting on Las Americas or Autopista Duarte and really moving.

Is it foolhardy? Maybe, but it's also a helluva lotta fun.

So that is just the other side of the story.
If I might ask is it a Ducati? Being a real speed freak that brings back memories of doing 150+ on A6 downhill from Frankfurt to Kaiserslaughtern! Of course that was twenty years ago but I still dream of going to Germany and renting a busa and going 200!

Oh yeah, back to the post. I have a year under my belt here in the DR riding my Yamaha 115 and I have not really had any problems, gracias a Dios! In fact I have a Suszuki Bandit 1200 in the states of which I'm fairily scared to ride on.

People can say what they want but speaking from experience with over 4000 miles here and many more back in the states at least here in Santiago and Moca there is no comparison to driving back in the states - I would choose the DR any day of the week. Sure people will talk about the danger, etc, etc compared but has anybody really bothered to compare the relative miles traveled of motorcycles compared to cars here with those in the US? I can assure you it is 10 times more!

I have had many more close calls back in the states than here in the DR. If all of a sudden we could transplant all of the motorbikes and their riders from here to the US all I could tell you is that the states' higways would like like tomato soup for all of the blood.