Changing title on a vehicle

D

DRDreamer72

Guest
Hi,
Would someone be kind enough to say which office I need to go to and what I need to transfer the title of a vehicle to the new owner please?

Ta
 
F

Fabio J. Guzman

Guest
It's not that simple. To start with, you need to have a deed of sale notarized.
 
C

cobraboy

Guest
Ypu have to get a statement from PN the car was not stolen.
 
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cavok

Guest
Doesn;t the OP want to know what he has to do as a seller? As a seller, you only have to sign the back of the title, but it's best to have a sales contract of some sort. A formal contract should be drawn up by an attorney. The seller has to pay to sales taxes.
 
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C

cavok

Guest
Doesn;t the OP want to know what he has to do as a seller? As a seller, you only have to sign the back of the title, but it's best to have a sales contract of some sort. A formal contract should be drawn up by an attorney. The seller has to pay to sales taxes.

Correction: the buyer has to pay the sales taxes.
 
C

cavok

Guest
And the tax is not what the sales contract states. It is what DGII says the vehicle is worth, routinely higher.

Just like in the states, the buyer always wants to put a fake low-ball sales price in the contract. DGII will charge you the higher of what their books say it's worth or what's in the contract.

I used a lawyer the last time I bought a car. They checked on the DGII price and that's what we put in the contract. In my case, the DGII book value was less than what I paid. They drew up the contract, got all the notarizations, stolen car check, paid the taxes, and transferred the title.

I think I paid $50-$60 for the lawyer fee. Well worth it IMO to not have to do all that by myself.
 
L

lifeisgreat

Guest
DgII takes 2% of there book value , lawyer todo takes $50-200 I here from people...
 
C

cobraboy

Guest
Just like in the states, the buyer always wants to put a fake low-ball sales price in the contract. DGII will charge you the higher of what their books say it's worth or what's in the contract.

I used a lawyer the last time I bought a car. They checked on the DGII price and that's what we put in the contract. In my case, the DGII book value was less than what I paid. They drew up the contract, got all the notarizations, stolen car check, paid the taxes, and transferred the title.

I think I paid $50-$60 for the lawyer fee. Well worth it IMO to not have to do all that by myself.
We use a local car/moto dealer friend for our title transfers for a small fee plus costs. Fast turnaround.
 
U

Uzin

Guest
Is there a sales tax for motorbikes too .... !? and a police check for stolen moto .... (I don't think we had any of these for bikes)
 
C

cobraboy

Guest
Is there a sales tax for motorbikes too .... !? and a police check for stolen moto .... (I don't think we had any of these for bikes)
Yes.

The Catch-22 is if the bike was never registered in the first place, you can't get the PN certificate. Additionally, all VIN numbers are inspected by the PN before the PN form is issued.

There is a massive unregistered bike graveyard by the funky PN office at the old Santiago airport.
 
D

DRDreamer72

Guest
Doesn;t the OP want to know what he has to do as a seller? As a seller, you only have to sign the back of the title, but it's best to have a sales contract of some sort. A formal contract should be drawn up by an attorney. The seller has to pay to sales taxes.

The buyer is OK with no contract. This is to just get a the paperwork sorted after them using it on loan for a year.

So, I need only take the new owner info and the matricula signed to DGII??
 
J

JDJones

Guest
The buyer is OK with no contract. This is to just get the paperwork sorted after them using it on loan for a year.

So, I need only take the new owner info and the matricula signed to DGII??

No.

DGII requires the signed and notarized contract, the Plan Piloto certificate(police report) and the matricula in the sellers name and signed by the seller and the buyer on the back.

Give them all of that, pay the tax they assess, and they give you new matricula.
 
C

cavok

Guest
The buyer is OK with no contract. This is to just get a the paperwork sorted after them using it on loan for a year.

So, I need only take the new owner info and the matricula signed to DGII??

No, just sign the title. It's the buyer who has to take it DGII.

I've sold two cars to buyers like that. No contract at all. I signed the back of the titles and they gave me the money. However, in my case, the buyers were used car dealers planning on selling it to someone else and wanted to avoid paying the taxes. Not exactly legit, but that was their problem. I'm not sure how they got around not having a contract with my signature on it(?).

Being dealers, they took care of all the paperwork for the buyers when they sold it and sent me a copy of the transfer of title. Make sure you get a transfer of title because you are still legally liable in any accident until the title has been officially transferred.

Anything is negotiable, but it is the buyer's responsiblity to have a legal contract drawn up, check that the car is not stolen, pay the taxes, and file the appropriate paperwork. Also, get a copy of his cedula and his number and address for your records(sounds like you might have that already).

I bought a car about 6 months ago and, as the buyer, I had a lawyer draw up an official contract, check to see if it was stolen, pay the taxes, and file the paperwork.
 
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Brandi

New member
Oct 10, 2016
6
2
3
No, just sign the title. It's the buyer who has to take it DGII.

I've sold two cars to buyers like that. No contract at all. I signed the back of the titles and they gave me the money. However, in my case, the buyers were used car dealers planning on selling it to someone else and wanted to avoid paying the taxes. Not exactly legit, but that was their problem. I'm not sure how they got around not having a contract with my signature on it(?).

Being dealers, they took care of all the paperwork for the buyers when they sold it and sent me a copy of the transfer of title. Make sure you get a transfer of title because you are still legally liable in any accident until the title has been officially transferred.

Anything is negotiable, but it is the buyer's responsiblity to have a legal contract drawn up, check that the car is not stolen, pay the taxes, and file the appropriate paperwork. Also, get a copy of his cedula and his number and address for your records(sounds like you might have that already).

I bought a car about 6 months ago and, as the buyer, I had a lawyer draw up an official contract, check to see if it was stolen, pay the taxes, and file the paperwork.
It’s 2024 now and need clarification on the process now. I am selling my pasola to a friend.

I have drawn up Bill of sale, contract of sale, paid invoice for pasola. I currently have the title in my name.

Is the below correct?

Get Bill of sale and contract of sale notorized? Do both parties need to be at notary ? Like in US?

Fill the back of title to new owners name and both sign.

Take all documents to DGII and pay 2% tax.

Question: with the above do they issue the new title in the buyers name there and we walk out with the new title?

Any advise or guidance is greatly appreciated DDB
 

cavok

Silver
Jun 16, 2014
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Cabarete
It’s 2024 now and need clarification on the process now. I am selling my pasola to a friend.

I have drawn up Bill of sale, contract of sale, paid invoice for pasola. I currently have the title in my name.

Is the below correct?

Get Bill of sale and contract of sale notorized? Do both parties need to be at notary ? Like in US?

Fill the back of title to new owners name and both sign.

Take all documents to DGII and pay 2% tax.

Question: with the above do they issue the new title in the buyers name there and we walk out with the new title?

Any advise or guidance is greatly appreciated DDB
The last time I did it, the signing of the contract and the title was done and notarized at the same time. After paying the 2% at DGII, the pasola has to be taken to Plan Piloto in Santiago to be checked by the PN. I forget how much those fees were(?). Most people just pay an attorney to take care of that. They are able to avoid taking to moto to Santiago. It's not cheap. Cost for a 60K pasola was around 9K pesos in fees total.
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
Jan 7, 2016
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The last time I did it, the signing of the contract and the title was done and notarized at the same time. After paying the 2% at DGII, the pasola has to be taken to Plan Piloto in Santiago to be checked by the PN. I forget how much those fees were(?). Most people just pay an attorney to take care of that. They are able to avoid taking to moto to Santiago. It's not cheap. Cost for a 60K pasola was around 9K pesos in fees total.
I've done a couple of dozen purchases and sales over the years, and I can tell you, having a lawyer handle the sale is by far the path of least resistance.
Pay a few bucks and in a day or two you or the buyer has a new matricula in hand.
Doing it yourself is easy enough, but extremely time-consuming.
If you don't place a value on your time, do it yourself.
 
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scotia

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Mar 18, 2004
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After listening to my husband's recent journey of time spent getting one of our cars in his name, I'd agree with hiring a lawyer. First he spent half a day at the police station but part of that was a social visit. Next the guy he paid, who's job it is to get everything done in Santo Domingo, messed up some number, and my husband had to go to the 'Capital' himself. We just sold our 2 cars to his cousin's dealership and signing the papers at the lawyers was all that was required.
 
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windeguy

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Jul 10, 2004
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I've done a couple of dozen purchases and sales over the years, and I can tell you, having a lawyer handle the sale is by far the path of least resistance.
Pay a few bucks and in a day or two you or the buyer has a new matricula in hand.
Doing it yourself is easy enough, but extremely time-consuming.
If you don't place a value on your time, do it yourself.
Even I, who will do everything possible to avoid lawyers, realized that when buying a vehicle a lawyer is sometimes the way to go to minimize the time and difficulty. One of the 5 vehicles that we purchased here actually involved using a lawyer.
 
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