Clean up time in Punta Cana

Dolores

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Minister of Tourism David Collado announced that Dominican beaches in the eastern and southern regions are again open for recreational activities. The Ministry had ordered on Sunday, 18 September 2022 that beaches nationwide be off limits to human use for the passing of Hurricane Fiona on Monday, 19 September.

Tourism Minister Collado also tweeted that for the most part, the National Hotels & Tourism Association (Asonahores) reports that damages to hotel property were mostly in landscaping and areas that do not merit the closing of the hotels. Crews are at work to restore regular activities at the properties.

Donations are being coordinated to help the staff at the hotels whose own dwellings would have been affected. Thousands of those who work in Punta Cana live in Higuey, probably the most affected city by the storm.

Tourists who come are welcome to bring...

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Buffness

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Saw this first hand …so on Monday …the only hotels open were those hotels with generators . Most hotels, gas stations , supermarkets were closed . This highlights how we in Punta Cana have become reliant on CEPM , who , by the way , did a great job restoring power to most areas quickly ….and promised not to disconnect the electricity supply for those on prepaid meters who weren’t able to pay during the hurricane ( if my understanding of their text is correct) .,

The part in the article about “Tourists who come are welcome to bring school supplies” to “help the staff at the hotels” …how about … 1. help from their employers first, then 2. help from us fellow La Altagracia residents , Dominican and non Dominican, who are in a position to help…and then maybe 3. help from external visitors .

“Charity begins at home “ as the saying goes.
 

bachata

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Aug 18, 2007
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I am surprised all this huge investment in punta Cana and Babaro and nobody came with the idea to build a underground power distribution lines.
Example the neighborhood where I live the oldest section is by air and every storm we have in the area affected that part of the neighborhood but in my zone which is underground wired we have not problems.

JJ
 

flyinroom

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Aug 26, 2012
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A storm like that probably caused the Laguna Bavaro to overflow and flood out Cabeza de Toro.
In the past the government has had to step in and force Barcelo Bavaro to open up floodgates to alleviate the flooding that had Cabeza de Toro under six feet of water.
The result created rivers of sludge flowing into Bavaro Beach and within hours the sea was turned from a beautiful blue/turquoise to a very unattractive shade of brown. It made its way up the coast as far as Fiesta (Palladium).
The beach, in my opinion, never really returned to its previous pristine condition.
Does anybody have any idea what is happening over there?
 
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NALs

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I am surprised all this huge investment in punta Cana and Babaro and nobody came with the idea to build a underground power distribution lines.
Example the neighborhood where I live the oldest section is by air and every storm we have in the area affected that part of the neighborhood but in my zone which is underground wired we have not problems.

JJ
In the entire DR it should be underground, but there are two things why overground is preferred.

One, it's cheaper.

Two, at least in more populated areas like Santo Domingo underground wiring has been done in certain streets only to have wire theives undug them and steal them. Once the wires are overground this theft is reduced. Notice that the aluminium light poles on Las Americas Highway are linked with an overground cable when everywhere in the world those light poles have underground wiring? Well, when the road was redone a few years ago it had underground wiring. Guess what happened to them?

The same story repeats itself with the new lighting in the malecon placed there when David Collado redid the sea facing part. In the beginning they had underground wiring. In the beginning… I even questioned why the bothered doing that since it's already known underground wires are stolen in this country. Soon enough new wires overground became evident in many areas.

The same happens to street lighting with solar panels. Remember when the Mauricio Baez Bridge over the Higuamo River in San Pedro de Macoris was inaugurated? All the lighting had no hanging wires and solar panels. Now there are different lighting poles and a overhead wire connecting all of them. For a time the bridge was dark not because of power blackouts, but because the solar panels above each light fixture were missing. Rest assure, it wasn't EDEEste that removed them. Funny enough is in Port-au-Prince, Haiti there is a main road with lighting that has solar panels and to this day I think the solar panels are still there. Poverty incites theives to take them? Yeah, right.
 
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bachata

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Aug 18, 2007
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In the entire DR it should be underground, but there are two things why overground is preferred.

One, it's cheaper.

Two, at least in more populated areas like Santo Domingo underground wiring has been done in certain streets only to have wire theives undug them and steal them. Once the wires are overground this theft is reduced. Notice that the aluminium light poles on Las Americas Highway are linked with an overground cable when everywhere in the world those light poles have underground wiring? Well, when the road was redone a few years ago it had underground wiring. Guess what happened to them?

The same story repeats itself with the new lighting in the malecon placed there when David Collado redid the sea facing part. In the beginning they had underground wiring. In the beginning… I even questioned why the bothered doing that since it's already known underground wires are stolen in this country. Soon enough new wires overground became evident in many areas.

The same happens to street lighting with solar panels. Remember when the Mauricio Baez Bridge over the Higuamo River in San Pedro de Macoris was inaugurated? All the lighting had no hanging wires and solar panels. Now there are different lighting poles and a overhead wire connecting all of them. For a time the bridge was dark not because of a power blackout, but because the solar panels above each light fixture were missing. Rest assure, it wasn't EDEEste that removed them. Funny enough is the in Port-au-Prince, Haiti there is a main road with lighting that gas solar panels and to this day I think the solar panels are still there. Poverty incites theives to take them? Yeah, right.
Yes I've seen that happened in Santiago City too.
Avenida Circunvalación lights underground wires stolen long time ago...
Los roba cobre o Piperos.

JJ
 
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JD Jones

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I've seen plenty of overhead wiring stolen here, and on Las Americas too. Once they even stole the overhead wiring in front of the police station.
 

RDKNIGHT

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In Cocotal its all underground the electric . the problem is the main feeds leading into to Cocotal all above ground . the poles that fell down were made of coccrete ... go figure
 
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jd426

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In Cocotal its all underground the electric . the problem is the main feeds leading into to Cocotal all above ground . the poles that fell down were made of coccrete ... go figure
They were probably were stingy with the Rebar ,or perhaps even had none at all .
Concrete can take amazing amounts of Pressure , but it cannot take Tension.. and a sideways Wind is all tension
( An Engineer guy explained that to me)
 
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JD Jones

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More Gov't relief:

President Luis Abinader announced Thursday night that they are planning the reconstruction of 5,500 homes in the eastern part and another 2,800 in the northeast of the country , corresponding to families affected by the passage of Hurricane Fiona over the national territory.

 
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Playabavaro

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Punta Cana is almost back to normal as it should be... Gracias A dios
Nobody has mentioned the area down by playa bávaro, the sewers flooding the streets in some places 2 or 3 feet deep the tourists walking thru that crap must just love it ,not to mention the amount of locals and children getting sick ,then the mosquito s ,they need drainage and sewers and clean water ,so bad!!!
 

RDKNIGHT

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Nobody has mentioned the area down by playa bávaro, the sewers flooding the streets in some places 2 or 3 feet deep the tourists walking thru that crap must just love it ,not to mention the amount of locals and children getting sick ,then the mosquito s ,they need drainage and sewers and clean water ,so bad!!!
Yea I seen that... We just had a major Hurricane the tourists hopefully understand....
 

SKY

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Apr 11, 2004
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Claro still has problems in Punta Cana with cell service. Internet working, but data outside of your house does not work as well as the cell. But they are working hard to get up to speed. Everything else here is pretty normal. Main roads are clear.
 

Playabavaro

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Aug 19, 2020
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Yea I seen that... We just had a major Hurricane the tourists hopefully understand....
I agree with you, but i guess i should have been clearer. Yes we just had a hurricane hence sewer is spewing out But it does this every time it rains more than few minutes.
We desperately need some help with this ,because approximately 2000 more apt are currently being built. Where will that shit go and our ground water is full of it already.
 
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