Cooking over Highest Flame possible

J

jeb321

Guest
I cook. I love to cook. I read cookbooks, articles, magazines concerning techniques, new recipes, food glorious food But I do not and never have understood how so many (who knows? All?) dominicans cook over the highest flame/heat. Yesterday we had the once weekly housekeeper in. Had taken a chicken out of freezer night before and decided, just like that to ask whether she could cook something. Anyway bottom line she proceeded to cook, browning first (that was fine) then to same pot added veggies etc. we had on hand and then....added water to pot on highest possible heat which we finally had to say "shouldn't you turn this down". No she said it had to keep going like this until it drys up. We said can't it just do that its been bubbling awhile already. So after what seemed to me long (it actually wasn't that long I guess) it was finished. It was tasty but it just makes no sense to me as to the method of pretty quick for 3. Lb chicken bubbling, boiling away like this. Today I went to reheat and noticed in my chicken piece it was underdone. I have seen dominicans do cook over the very high flames. Why? Of certainty dominican food/cooking does not have a sterling reputation when it comes to cooking. Probably most of the world knows the word "braising". Not here it seems.
So there must be a cultural reason. Yes?
 
L

Luperon

Guest
I cook. I love to cook. I read cookbooks, articles, magazines concerning techniques, new recipes, food glorious food But I do not and never have understood how so many (who knows? All?) dominicans cook over the highest flame/heat. Yesterday we had the once weekly housekeeper in. Had taken a chicken out of freezer night before and decided, just like that to ask whether she could cook something. Anyway bottom line she proceeded to cook, browning first (that was fine) then to same pot added veggies etc. we had on hand and then....added water to pot on highest possible heat which we finally had to say "shouldn't you turn this down". No she said it had to keep going like this until it drys up. We said can't it just do that its been bubbling awhile already. So after what seemed to me long (it actually wasn't that long I guess) it was finished. It was tasty but it just makes no sense to me as to the method of pretty quick for 3. Lb chicken bubbling, boiling away like this. Today I went to reheat and noticed in my chicken piece it was underdone. I have seen dominicans do cook over the very high flames. Why? Of certainty dominican food/cooking does not have a sterling reputation when it comes to cooking. Probably most of the world knows the word "braising". Not here it seems.
So there must be a cultural reason. Yes?
Sorry to simplify. Answer for the most part... Low IQ

Does she open cans with your best steak knife?

Wash floors with excessive water shorting out anything electrical nearby?

Etc

Etc
 
C

cobraboy

Guest
I cook. I love to cook. I read cookbooks, articles, magazines concerning techniques, new recipes, food glorious food But I do not and never have understood how so many (who knows? All?) dominicans cook over the highest flame/heat. Yesterday we had the once weekly housekeeper in. Had taken a chicken out of freezer night before and decided, just like that to ask whether she could cook something. Anyway bottom line she proceeded to cook, browning first (that was fine) then to same pot added veggies etc. we had on hand and then....added water to pot on highest possible heat which we finally had to say "shouldn't you turn this down". No she said it had to keep going like this until it drys up. We said can't it just do that its been bubbling awhile already. So after what seemed to me long (it actually wasn't that long I guess) it was finished. It was tasty but it just makes no sense to me as to the method of pretty quick for 3. Lb chicken bubbling, boiling away like this. Today I went to reheat and noticed in my chicken piece it was underdone. I have seen dominicans do cook over the very high flames. Why? Of certainty dominican food/cooking does not have a sterling reputation when it comes to cooking. Probably most of the world knows the word "braising". Not here it seems.
So there must be a cultural reason. Yes?
From what I understand the "cultural" reason began with lack of refrigeration and fear of meat contamination.

Many cook the crap out of anything for that reason.
 
L

Luperon

Guest
From what I understand the "cultural" reason began with lack of refrigeration and fear of meat contamination.

Many cook the crap out of anything for that reason.
Very true. But having the flame bigger than the pot or covering rice with a black plastic bag is bad culture.
 
W

william webster

Guest
Contaminated meat -- food in general

ever notice how the salad dressings are heavy on vinegar ?
for good reason...........

My goat stew... the marinade has vinegar....as do many other marinades in other cultures
 
N

NanSanPedro

Guest
From what I understand the "cultural" reason began with lack of refrigeration and fear of meat contamination.

Many cook the crap out of anything for that reason.
Same in Haiti. You cook the **** out of everything so that you don't get sick.
 
C

Chirimoya

Guest
Mod note: Sent to Living Forum as not East Coast specific.
 
R

RockyM

Guest
Same in Haiti. You cook the **** out of everything so that you don't get sick.
When travelling in the Far East companions of mine would drink whiskey with each meal to help prevent food poisoning. This is nonsense, but I like to think it works :p
 
D

dv8

Guest
it's "my mother did that, and her mother before that and the mother of her mother" and so on. there is not much thought given to the process, it's how it 's always been done.
 
W

Wishing you well

Guest
OP,

The answer has plenty to do with the fact that most Dominicans for decades didn't have the privilege to cook with a stove, but with carbones and wood.

There isn't flame up or flame down capabilities or control thereof with carbones or wood, and hence getting use to high heat or high flames.

Also, Dominicans use big cast iron calderos and pots, no damages from the high flames/heat expected this way either, in fact, the most crunchy the food, the better the flavor.

But I do tell you that nothing beat a comida cooked at the campo in such way though.
 
F

Fulano2

Guest
That’s what I heard, tradition based on rural cooking systems.
 
M

monfongo

Guest
Nothing beats a meal cooked in the campo in such a way ? I've had many meals cooked in the campo and can honestly say they all sucked, in my opinion.
 
C

Cdn_Gringo

Guest
The relationship between the ingredients and the cooking temperature is not something you can casually dismiss. Often the subtle relationship between cooking time and temperature is what allows the essential flavours to develop and permeate the dish. Boiling the crap out of a stew, a soup or a pot roast can ruin the delicate balance that is flavour.
 
D

drstock

Guest
Very true. But having the flame bigger than the pot or covering rice with a black plastic bag is bad culture.
I saw somebody cooking rice covering it with pieces of what looked like banana leaf, even though there was a lid on the pot. What's that all about?
 
D

Don PISTOLAS

Guest
I am with you. I love food cooked on a fagon. Even better is food cooked down by the river over some burning wood on a make shift stove made out of rocks! Maybe its the river water that makes the difference :)
 
W

william webster

Guest
The calderos are aluminum from what I've seen...not heavy cast iron
 
W

Wishing you well

Guest
I saw somebody cooking rice covering it with pieces of what looked like banana leaf, even though there was a lid on the pot. What's that all about?
It helps to use the vapors as heat source while cooking in low heat. The banana covers are used to seal the pot.
 
W

Wishing you well

Guest
Nothing beats a meal cooked in the campo in such a way ? I've had many meals cooked in the campo and can honestly say they all sucked, in my opinion.
To each its own.

Some like it, some do not.