Correct me if I am wrong, but..

dew

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Apr 24, 2010
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It doesn't seem like the DR, in its current state, is the best (or even a decent) place for a recent college grad like myself. I am a 20 something Dominican born and US raised male that is interested in moving back to my home country. I graduated with a B.S. in finance and am simply looking at some of the options available to me. Actually, I'm trying to find out if moving, working and making a good living in the DR is even an option. I've done several internships in Japan and getting a job there is my "Plan A" for now, but I am just looking for opinions to see if DR could become my Plan C or D or E.. etc.

This might be a long shot but is how is the finance/sales/marketing industry in DR? Is it mostly local companies or are there any American ones with a presence over there?

Any input would be appreciated.
 

J D Sauser

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Nov 20, 2004
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www.hispanosuizainvest.com
Since there is, in my opinion, too little manufacturing, there are few Int'l companies present worth mentioning, except the ones linked to the tourism industry. Probably there are more call centers run by Americans than much anything else.
You could check with the US consulate and then try to approach these companies in the US and try to build a career in your field in and aim to position yourself so that IF they would send people down to the DR, you could be the one going there on a US salary. It's a long shot and the options are few, but at least, it would seem to me a safe approach so you don't gamble away your education and punch a hole into your curriculum.
Because the one thing you do NOT want to do, is to try around here, waste a year or two and have to come back and scramble for answers as to what you have been doing in the first years after your recent graduation. It could just too likely look like you went somewhere and failed. Not a good start.

Keep in mind too, that not only your country will have changed from what you may remember it, but you too, even being DR born, will have changed in your years studying in the US... so much, that you may soon object to some of the work "culture" or lack thereof here and your fellow countrymen may also poke fun at you for being such a square thinker.

... J-D.
 

mike l

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Sep 4, 2007
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It doesn't seem like the DR, in its current state, is the best (or even a decent) place for a recent college grad like myself. I am a 20 something Dominican born and US raised male that is interested in moving back to my home country. I graduated with a B.S. in finance and am simply looking at some of the options available to me. Actually, I'm trying to find out if moving, working and making a good living in the DR is even an option. I've done several internships in Japan and getting a job there is my "Plan A" for now, but I am just looking for opinions to see if DR could become my Plan C or D or E.. etc.

This might be a long shot but is how is the finance/sales/marketing industry in DR? Is it mostly local companies or are there any American ones with a presence over there?

Any input would be appreciated.

Stick with plan A, whereby you can enjoy Kobe beef.

If you have lived and worked in one of the most expensive cities in the world then the DR is Plan ????

Make your $$$ in a first world country before accepting the problems associated with a developing country!
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
I have a friend in marketing and he tells me there is a lot of money to be made in this area. They even have an annual awards presentation ceremony. That being said getting a foothold here in a big company will more than likely require a cu?a, and of course impeccable Spanish.
 

Chirimoya

Moderator
Dec 9, 2002
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Without contacts you would be very lucky to get anything.

An alternative suggestion would be to apply for the Peace Corps - one of their projects in the DR is about providing marketing advice and training for small campesino enterprises. It would not earn you big bucks but it would be an important contribution to the country and an indirect way of building contacts and networking.

Peace Corps in Dominican Republic | Projects | CED
 

Hillbilly

Moderator
Jan 1, 2002
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Stick to Plan A.

While I was a Peace Corps Volunter, way, way back in the first year of the program, you need to be really convinced that this is something you can do. You will live on around 10,000 a month and get US$225 put in the bank for each month served. NOT what you would call monetary rewards.

However, IF you have that "feeling" about doing something really good for your (two) country (ies), go for it. You would make a positive contribution, and career wise it might help, but I am not that familiar with what major companies really want these days.

I truly like the idea of Japan, one of my favorite places. If you can work there, I'd say, long term, that is the way to go. When you retire, the DR will probably still be here and still need all of your expertise.

HB
 

belgiank

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Jun 13, 2009
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considering your degree, and apparently your opportunities, go for those opportunities... spend a number of years earning some nice savings... and then move to the DR in "semi-retirement"...

whilst not dependent on an immediate income here, you can consider opening up your own business (consultancy) or whatever, while enjoying the more relaxed lifestyle, which will be welcome after a number of years in the rat race...

mi esposa and myself did this, and are enjoying it to the full, while looking for opportunities...
 

yacht chef

Active member
Sep 13, 2009
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What is wrong with the US OOOOO S what is right with the US. Well I well need a manager to help me with my street stand sushi cart when we are booth old and gray. Thy well love U long time.
 

dew

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Apr 24, 2010
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I know this is late, but thank you all for your advice. And like someone mentioned, the country is probably not at all what I remember it to be.. that's something that I had not thought about so thanks for bringing that up.

And yes, kobe beef is delicious haha.
 

Lando calrisian

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Mar 1, 2009
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Dude go to Japan, make the money, learn the skills and then come back and share with the people. Maybe you could be the Dominican face of a huge Japanese company someday. Sayonara....
 

greydread

Well-known member
Jan 3, 2007
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I am a 20 something Dominican born and US raised male that is interested in moving back to my home country. I graduated with a B.S. in finance and am simply looking at some of the options available to me. Actually, I'm trying to find out if moving, working and making a good living in the DR is even an option.
Keep that fire lit while you travel the World gaining experience. In 10 - 15 years if you're still interested your native home will need you more than ever as they struggle to modernize their growing economy. Work on a graduate degree and prepare yourself to return to the land of your birth with the needed credentials and tested skills to make a real difference.

Real reform rarely comes from inside a failing system.

All sage advice preceeded.
 

RGVgal

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May 26, 2008
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Go to Japan or get a job in the U.S. for one of the big firms. Establish yourself in the field and then get a position for a big company working remotely. Then you can live any where you want and get your U.S. salary.