Cost of a tire rim grill?

web

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Nov 5, 2005
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Something like this, but the lizard is optional.



How do you like your goanna?
Pretty sure you can pick one of those up for like 1300 - 2000 DOP

Depending where you are I know they sell them in Puerto Plata all over the place and also check out compraventas (Pawn shops)
 

Xavier_Onassis

Active member
Aug 6, 2006
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Alligator LOOKS like chicken, but it does not TASTE like chicken. If you have been served something identified as alligator that tasted like chicken, it WAS chicken.
 

PeterInBrat

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May 29, 2006
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The reason I'm interested is I've been designing a "rocket stove" for use in the DR and I want to know if I should use rim for the burner or something else. I cast my first prototype yesterday and did a small burn today. Think of a cone made out of two stacked terra cotta flower pots(an 8" diameter and a 6" diameter) cast inside of a five gallon bucket using an insulated refractory cement. Set it up on some cinder blocks over a fire and then have a burner with about a 4" opening. There's a gap between the two layers to suck air into a secondary burn chamber. The flower pots are removed after casting. The cone acts as a venturi and the masonry insulates and focuses the heat back into the hot gases. It burns with a clear flame.

I used perlite and mortar for this cast, but I'm hoping to do a higher temp blend for the next batch. After burning brush for two hours, the outside of the burn chamber was still only about 130 degrees and the high inner temp and air flow made for better burn efficiency and very little smoke. Perlite was $20 for 30 gallons(4cu ft) so it's costing about $5 per cast for stoves that weigh about 20 pounds each.

Lots of Youtubes out there on rocket stoves. Most are L shaped burn tubes using 4" PVC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOZ7gJaqdtQ
 
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william webster

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2009
23,578
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Cdn_Gringo is looking to cook... needs a grill

where are those older threadS about 'parillas' ?
big or small......

I love grilling......

just did a rainbow trout up here on Lake Huron....
cold outside here..... really cold

fresh water fish in cold water............. pickerel, whitefish

Gringo needs a grill
 

chic

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Nov 20, 2013
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The reason I'm interested is I've been designing a "rocket stove" for use in the DR and I want to know if I should use rim for the burner or something else. I cast my first prototype yesterday and did a small burn today. Think of a cone made out of two stacked terra cotta flower pots(an 8" diameter and a 6" diameter) cast inside of a five gallon bucket using an insulated refractory cement. Set it up on some cinder blocks over a fire and then have a burner with about a 4" opening. There's a gap between the two layers to suck air into a secondary burn chamber. The flower pots are removed after casting. The cone acts as a venturi and the masonry insulates and focuses the heat back into the hot gases. It burns with a clear flame.

I used perlite and mortar for this cast, but I'm hoping to do a higher temp blend for the next batch. After burning brush for two hours, the outside of the burn chamber was still only about 130 degrees and the high inner temp and air flow made for better burn efficiency and very little smoke. Perlite was $20 for 30 gallons(4cu ft) so it's costing about $5 per cast for stoves that weigh about 20 pounds each.

Lots of Youtubes out there on rocket stoves. Most are L shaped burn tubes using 4" PVC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOZ7gJaqdtQ
what are rocket stoves used/good for????:cool::cool::cool::cool:
 

PeterInBrat

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May 29, 2006
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They use less than half as much wood to cook than the three cinder block stoves most commonly used in the campo(and by about a billion other ppl) and they produce far less smoke. Open campfire cooking kills an estimated four million ppl a year from respiratory illness, mostly women and children. The cost of cooking fuel can a quarter to half of a rural family's income.



The most popular rocket stove in Africa is something called the Jiko stove. About $15 to make and a real game changer.
 

jd426

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2009
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I was researching this a while back also for a different application , and agree this is a very good project..
As you said they are extremely efficient, and produce a Clean Hot Flame .
I believe there was a Charity mission of some kind that gave smaller versions of them away to poor people I think it was India or Africa ? so they could cook their meals, with just a couple of sticks.. not much wood at all.

..
They do sell smaller ones made from Recycled and cut up PROPANE tanks , with legs.. not sure how good they are.
but they sell a lot of them on Ebay.. from what I read though they only heat like Water for soup, or maybe make Eggs while Camping.. they dont produce a lot of heat , not like a Propane flame, but considering the fuel is only some sticks , still pretty impressive , l however not enough to like DEEP Fry with Oil .. or cook large fish.
If you make a LARGER version, with some real BTU capabilities,
I would be most curious how it turns out.
Keep us posted.
 

PeterInBrat

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The five gallon size would be big enough to boil a 30qt pot of water so it's def big enough..

The propane units are nice but take way too much time to make. I'm trying to make something where one or two guys can produce 100 more stoves a day at under $5 each.

Bigger units, like in 55 gallon drums, could be used to increase efficiency for biomass charcoal production. It seems counter intuitive, but charcoal made from coconut husks, bamboo, rice hulls, bagasse or other Ag waste has a negative carbon footprint. It's a dust for some feed stock so you add a binder to it to keep intact. An extrusion device can be a simple as a modified meat grinder or machines that take in sawdust and produce over a ton a day of finished product. This kind of thing could have been a game changer in Haiti and still could be:

[video=youtube;UGBb6_uY4k8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGBb6_uY4k8[/video]

Charcoal is esp useful in cities because it doesn't create as much smoke and you can carry more charcoal than wood on a truck.
 
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PeterInBrat

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May 29, 2006
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The current designs out there ALL feature a feed tube into the riser and only a 4" burn tube. Mine is a simple cone(well kinda) that would sit on top of the three cinder blocks that they already use with an 8" opening and a 4" exhaust. I want something that you can feed long branches into, not kiln dried kindling. You want a bigger fire? No prob, just build a bigger fire under the cone. For smaller, surround the bottom on three sides with bricks and have a smaller exhaust.

It's really a controlled chimney fire. However it works, I'm having enough fun burning off my brush pile with it and seeing the clear heat waves coming out of the top. I even melted a cheap stovetop grill on it. That heat has to go somewhere and the perlite keeps most of it in. I'm hoping that I can pick all three of cheap, simple and efficient. Getting any two is easy.

2.5 Million Dominicans use wood fires from what I hear..
 
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