Covid Vaccine Record needing to be officially stamped?

Cdn_Gringo

Gold
Apr 29, 2014
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I am hearing rumblings that some people receiving their 2nd dose are being instructed to go to Public Health in Puerto Plata to have an official stamp placed on their vaccine record if the clinic doesn't have a stamp. Does anyone have a stamp on their vaccine card? Anyone been told something similar or have more information if this is a real and necessary process?
 

La Profe_1

Moderator: Daily Headline News, Travel & Tourism
Oct 15, 2003
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I hope this isn't considered off-topic!

I have had both injections of the Moderna vaccine, but in the US. My card does not have a stamp on it.

Having dealt with Dominican bureaucracy countless times, I would guess that the stamp is a local requirement analogous to getting documents legalized.

However, for use within the DR itself, the need for a stamp really should be clarified.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
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My card has a blue colored stamp in the upper right hand corner showing the location of the vaccinations.

As for an explanation of what this card is good for in the future, stamped or un-stamped, I don't think anyone knows that yet.
Legalizing a document in the DR is normally only done at the Procuraduria from my experience.
 

RayO

Member
Mar 25, 2012
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We were advised when we got our 2nd shot to get an official stamp at the local hospital and laminate our card before we leave the country.
 

TropicalPaul

Bronze
Sep 3, 2013
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Whenever you do anything official in DR, the process is normally that you have to go somewhere, stand in line for quite a while, then be told that you need to bring another document or something is missing. In my experience of applying for permissions, getting phone lines connected, electricity, anything, Dominicans just love to find a problem with your paperwork, it's the cornerstone of Dominican customer service.

So I would advise anyone to insist on that little stamp on the card. If they didn't have one when you got the vaccine, maybe go back and insist that they find one?
 

Cdn_Gringo

Gold
Apr 29, 2014
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I am being told that you can take your vaccine record to the Provincial Public Heath office behind the fire station in Puerto Plata and get the card stamped. Someone said it took them 5 minutes to do.
 

Astucia

Active member
Oct 19, 2013
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I am being told that you can take your vaccine record to the Provincial Public Heath office behind the fire station in Puerto Plata and get the card stamped. Someone said it took them 5 minutes to do.
Well that's where I got my shots - and the stamp. I guess that was a good choice .:)
 

william webster

Platinum
Jan 16, 2009
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I read the 'no laminate' idea somewhere.... never would have thought of it

But here's more on the booster for you - written by a friend of mine
=======================================

I think the MoH have been poor in explaining how the Sinovac 'inactivated virus' vaccine works. It takes time - 2 weeks after the second jab you will be close to best efficiacy with a much lower efficiacy after one jab only. So far DR has low uptakes on the second jab!

Vaccines that make use of the entire pathogenic virus are called whole virus vaccines. Using a pathogen or a part of a pathogen in a vaccine is a traditional approach, and most vaccines available today work this way.

In contrast, the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna use genetic material that is chemically synthesized in a laboratory to teach our immune system how to fight off future infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

There are two different types of whole virus vaccines: live attenuated and inactivated.

Live attenuated vaccines use a weakened form of a pathogen. These elicit strong immune responses but are not suitable for people with a weakened immune system.

In an inactivated vaccine, the pathogen is killed or modified in such a way that it is unable to replicate. It cannot cause disease and is, therefore, suitable for those with a compromised immune system.

The inactivation step usually involves heat, radiation, or chemicals to destroy the pathogen’s genetic material, which stops it from replicating.

Inactivated vaccines can trigger a strong immune reaction, but it is usually not as strong as the reaction that live attenuated vaccines can produce. Due to this, a person may need booster shots to ensure ongoing protection.

The COVID-19 vaccines that Sinovac, Sinopharm, and Bharat Biotech have developed are inactivated vaccines.

Other examples of inactivated vaccines include those against polio, hepatitis A, and rabies.


Now the viral vector jab uses an active virus which is not covid19 and is designed to develop a strong reaction to covid19.

Sure there are risks, but with deactivated virus there are lower risks imo, except you need to be cautious for several weeks and understand you are only protected to a limited degree until after you get both doses, and then be prepared for a booster for long decent immunity. Also the nature of the jab explains why the side effects are lower.
 

Astucia

Active member
Oct 19, 2013
292
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28
If you laminate, you may not be able to enter a 'booster' shot - if it's needed one day
Take the card to the computer / copy center behind Bailees. Have them make a 2-sided copy of it, and THEN HAVE THEM LAMINATE THE COPY.
Keep the original in a safe place at home.

Lots of people do this for Cedulas and Residency Cards. Never had an issue of the copy not being accepted anywhere.
 
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