deportation, how does it work?

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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so i read this news in the morning:
Llegar?n desde Estados Unidos otros 80 dominicanos deportados

how does this process work exactly? those people travel on a separate plane filled only with deportees and police? how about if there is smaller number of people, say one or two? would they travel on a normal flight, in handcuffs, accompanied by the police?

who pays for this? USA or DR? it's not cheap to fly 80 people over and i know sometimes the groups are even bigger.

what will happen to them once they arrived? do they do more time or they are released at the airport and left to their own devices?

note that this is not a rant about a new set of criminals arriving to DR, i have genuine questions here.
 
May 12, 2005
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Yes, they fly on a plane either owned or chartered by the US Marshalls Service or Homeland Security. I believe that they come once a month.
 

kaykat18987

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Nov 25, 2013
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im not sure for this exact situation, but im from canada and i have a mexican friend who was deported from here, his refugee status we denied, went to court and all, and if he paid his own flight back, showed them his ticket and handed them his passport. show up the day of his flight like everyone else. execpt he had to meet 1 hour before they handed him his passport, was accompanied to the check in(no hand cufs). him paying his own flight was letting him stay an extra 60 days in canada and a note in the file that he can re apply in 3 years. if he would of let the canadian gouverment pay for it, he would of had to leave same day or next flight and then the possibilty to come back was very tight.(since you like owe moneyetc..
 

bronzeallspice

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Mar 26, 2012
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Dominicans deported from abroad to get job opportunities

Back home...now what?



Santo Domingo.- The Justice Ministry received 110 more Dominicans deported from the United States after serving sentences for various felonies, for which the authorities will help them reintegrate into society and provide job opportunities.

Justice minister Francisco Dom?nguez urged them to seek work and pledged the official support needed for reintegration into society.

The official spoke individually for more than one hour with most of the group about the various problems they face upon returning to their country him.

The Justice Ministry’s Deportee Integration Unit, created by Dominguez, works with Dominicans repatriated from the United States, Puerto Rico, Spain, Nations of Central America and other countries.

Unit director Hector Baez announced a job fair for returnees this month, in coordination with Dominican Republic’s Export and Investment Center (CEI-RD). He said local businesses, especially call centers requiring English-speaking staff will hire them for that service.


http://www.dominicantoday.com/dr/ec...deported-from-abroad-to-get-job-opportunities
 

bronzeallspice

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Mar 26, 2012
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Some are released upon arrival because they have done their time in US prisons while others are detained by police and prosecuted.
 

caribmike

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Jul 9, 2009
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Why they don't give these "job opportunities" to people what were here all the time and committed no crimes here or in the US?

Oh right, for call center work you need fluent English...
 

bronzeallspice

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Mar 26, 2012
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Because they either find them jobs(legit) keep them occupied or they will become idle and might resort to doing what got them deported in the first place. Others who are here have the opportunity to find employment at will.
 

zoomzx11

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Jan 21, 2006
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"reintegrate into society and provide job opportunities", my aching arse. The vast majority of these deported served crime for drug sales. They do not need job training as there are good opportunities in the narcotics businesses in the DR. Plus they have the added education gotten from their fellow criminals. These felons are let loose ,without supervision ,to prey on the population of the DR. Get a gun, get some training, practice and have a plan. Then you can relax.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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"reintegrate into society and provide job opportunities", my aching arse. The vast majority of these deported served crime for drug sales. They do not need job training as there are good opportunities in the narcotics businesses in the DR. Plus they have the added education gotten from their fellow criminals. These felons are let loose ,without supervision ,to prey on the population of the DR. Get a gun, get some training, practice and have a plan. Then you can relax.
What? No one has ever been shot in the back? You can never "relax".
 

Matilda

RIP Lindsay
Sep 13, 2006
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Once they arrive they are taken to the Immigration office. Each one has his file checked to see if there are any outstanding arrest warrants in place in this country. If they are, they are taken to the relevant department, DNCD, PN etc and then charged for whatever it is and remanded. If not, they are released straight back into society as they have done their time for the crime they committed in the US.

matilda
 

Harleysrock

BLACK LIVES MATTER
"reintegrate into society and provide job opportunities", my aching arse. The vast majority of these deported served crime for drug sales. They do not need job training as there are good opportunities in the narcotics businesses in the DR. Plus they have the added education gotten from their fellow criminals. These felons are let loose ,without supervision ,to prey on the population of the DR. Get a gun, get some training, practice and have a plan. Then you can relax.
Don't you think it would be better to try and help these people so they may actually contribute something to society if helped?
Never a good idea to just throw criminals on the street with no education or some assistance!!
If one criminal changes his/her life it's worth it to me!
 

caribmike

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Jul 9, 2009
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One might change and 5 others kill or rob somebody...

They should be put in camps and used to work the jobs no Dominican wants to do and the wages should be send to their wives and kids...

More "mano duro" is needed here.
 

Harleysrock

BLACK LIVES MATTER
I don't know I have never known felons till I moved here and I have always kinda thought murderers were scary people. One of my favorite people in our Barrio Murdered someone and robbed some places and went to jail for 5 years. I don't see him killing others now or robbing but i don't watch him 24/7. I guess he could be doing whatever but he does always want work and is eager to do anything.

It opened my eyes a bit about judging criminals.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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I don't know I have never known felons till I moved here and I have always kinda thought murderers were scary people. One of my favorite people in our Barrio Murdered someone and robbed some places and went to jail for 5 years. I don't see him killing others now or robbing but i don't watch him 24/7. I guess he could be doing whatever but he does always want work and is eager to do anything.

It opened my eyes a bit about judging criminals.
In my youth I worked at a bunch of manual labor jobs, shoulder to shoulder with ex-offenders and I learned that the difference between them and everyone else boiled down to circumstance, environment and opportunity. Guys who come up in impoverished surroundings where violence and crime are everywhere don't have their lives touched by it only if they are incredibly lucky. One of the most unforgettable characters I ever met was a 60 year old welder at a shipyard where I worked as a laborer before apprenticing to the electrician while I was in school. He had done 7 years in prison for beating a Guy to death with an axe handle for stealing from him. He was an extremely intelligent, intuitive and knowledgeable Guy with a good sense of discipline and a very rigidly defined code of honor. I've always wondered how his life could have turned out if he'd learned the welding trade BEFORE he went to prison.

For the most part, ex-offenders are just as good a people as those who would like to see their lives thrown away after serving their time. Some are better.
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
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Santiago de Los 30 Caballeros
so i read this news in the morning:
Llegar?n desde Estados Unidos otros 80 dominicanos deportados

how does this process work exactly? those people travel on a separate plane filled only with deportees and police? how about if there is smaller number of people, say one or two? would they travel on a normal flight, in handcuffs, accompanied by the police?

who pays for this? USA or DR? it's not cheap to fly 80 people over and i know sometimes the groups are even bigger.

what will happen to them once they arrived? do they do more time or they are released at the airport and left to their own devices?

note that this is not a rant about a new set of criminals arriving to DR, i have genuine questions here.

It all depends:

Deportees that arrived to the country after having served their jail time and followed up by an immigration hold from there, are transported via a chartered or official plane (depending on how many and when) to their nationality country. In the case of the DR, they come directly from the jail system in the U.S. and are handed over to local authorities at the airport.

These folks are then processed by the local authorities and depending on their family links in the country let go to their families in wait or referred to a local program to re-insert them into the general population to avoid engaging in crime here as well.

The batch of prisoners are vetted first. That's to say that people that served time or convicted of a violent crime (robbery, murder, etc...) are "fichados" first. The ones that were convicted or served jail time for sexual crimes against minors or rape, aggravated domestic violence and such, are "fichados" and also must continue to report to a local extended parole officer assigned to them.

The batch of prisoners that served jail time of convicted of drug related offenses and depending on the gravity of the charges/amount/type of conviction/etc... Are also vetted and provided with a local program of assistance for illegal substance abusers.

Most of the cases are related to minor law breakers, like using fake documents, being illegal in the country after losing their appeals, etc... These cases are just recorded and there's no criminal record created other than their admission as deportees into the country.

Then there are those that are repeat offenders, that were once deported from the U.S. and try to get back in or were arrested there after being deported before. These guys are a special case type.

Deportees that were not in jail serving time and/or were in a judicial removal process, are allowed to self deport by a given date.

These come in a regular flight, like any other passenger.

Deportees DON'T face any additional jail time or cases once arrived to the DR. Only those linked to open cases in the DR do so.

For the most part, the majority of deportees are not hard core criminals , but people that held long term permanent residency status in the U.S. and in the past had pleaded guilty to minor offenses that now have been reclassified as eligible for removal by the DHS under the loosened guidelines of the DOJ and congressional bills enacted since.
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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some people are "recoverable", some are not. but i would not put it down to "circumstance, environment and opportunity". some are simply rotten bastards and would act the same regardless of the circumstances, environment and opportunity. it's never one dimensional, thou. i approve of trying to integrate those folks back into the society and giving them something to live for. there will be many who will appreciate a second chance.

back my queries: it seems that USA bears the costs of deportation, then?
 

greydread

Platinum
Jan 3, 2007
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some people are "recoverable", some are not. but i would not put it down to "circumstance, environment and opportunity". some are simply rotten bastards and would act the same regardless of the circumstances, environment and opportunity. it's never one dimensional, thou. i approve of trying to integrate those folks back into the society and giving them something to live for. there will be many who will appreciate a second chance.

back my queries: it seems that USA bears the costs of deportation, then?
Please note that the entire thought that I expressed included the words: "The difference between them and everybody else". In other words, all things being equal, there would be arrest and conviction records which are similar to those who are raised in areas which are affected to poverty, violence and lack of education and opportunity to a lesser degree.

There are natural born criminals (simply rotten bastards) in every segment of society. My observation made the point that circumstance, environment and opportunity (or the lack, thereof) account for the proportional differences in arrests and convictions among the different demographics.