Does EVERY school have UNIFORMS?!

AuthorMom

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Apr 13, 2009
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We are looking into schools and pretty discouraged. Every private one seems to have uniforms and a traditional curriculum. We've got a 6 year old reading at 4th grade level,thanks to child-led learning style (a la Reggio) and there's no way he would work at a traditional-type school where he'd have to learn what someone else thinks he needs to learn when THEY want him to, rather than follow his own curiosity, which serves him (& every other child) quite well.

A uniform school seems to suggest a conformity that we can't deal with and very old-fashioned (Time Mag recently did a cover story on how outdated and ineffective traditional learning is).

We're looking into settling into Punta Cana but the only private schools here seem to be very like-minded and unoriginal. Can anyone suggest an alternative ANYWHERE in the country? Waldorf, Reggio, Montessori-type?Thanks!
 

Ezequiel

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Jun 4, 2008
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We are looking into schools and pretty discouraged. Every private one seems to have uniforms and a traditional curriculum. We've got a 6 year old reading at 4th grade level,thanks to child-led learning style (a la Reggio) and there's no way he would work at a traditional-type school where he'd have to learn what someone else thinks he needs to learn when THEY want him to, rather than follow his own curiosity, which serves him (& every other child) quite well.

A uniform school seems to suggest a conformity that we can't deal with and very old-fashioned (Time Mag recently did a cover story on how outdated and ineffective traditional learning is).

We're looking into settling into Punta Cana but the only private schools here seem to be very like-minded and unoriginal. Can anyone suggest an alternative ANYWHERE in the country? Waldorf, Reggio, Montessori-type?Thanks!
Unfortunately for you every school private or public have uniforms in the DR.
 

cassieann

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May 9, 2009
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School uniforms anywhere in the world remove a level of peer pressure no them and us with a uniform
 

Hillbilly

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Jan 1, 2002
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There is Montisori (sp) in Santo Domingo and Santiago..

HB

Take care of that young guy
 
B

BettyDiamond

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You want the child to decide what he needs to learn ? I dont quite understand what you are asking ,sounds like a recipe for disaster to me- what if the child isnt very curious.
Non uniform schools usually lead to pressure to buy the latest labels
 

Lambada

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Mar 4, 2004
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A uniform school seems to suggest a conformity that we can't deal with and very old-fashioned
You might want to look into other societal issues requiring conformity and which appear old-fashioned to you. There could be a larger picture to be examined before you make the decision to move here. If this country isn't the right one for you, you'd be far happier acknowledging that & finding a different country. The DR isn't going to mould itself to you or me or any expat and our perceptions; the adjustment has to be the other way round. Could be that that bright little 6 year old has saved Mum & Dad from a bad decision!
 
Nov 25, 2008
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your better off home schooling your child, especially the way your raising him to be "different"
if you find uniforms a distraction for you child's, then your raising him to be a social outcast, unless of course you yourself were raised like that,

good luck and I hope you do whats in the BEST interest of your child.
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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There are several Montessori schools in the capital, of varying standards. Some are certified by the American Montessori Society, others are Montessori in name only. My son attended one and it was excellent in almost every way.

Without exception, all require uniforms - it's pretty much universal in Dominican schools and everywhere in Latin America and the Caribbean. On the whole, DR school uniforms are fairly casual in comparison to those in some other countries, but there are some rules that I consider incompatible with the climate - like having to wear belted long trousers, socks and shoes.

There is an excellent school in the capital where the uniform is not as rigidly imposed as most others - children wear the polo shirt but can wear shorts, jeans - almost anything as long as it is blue - and don't have to wear black school shoes and white socks, they can wear sandals, and they don't have to tuck their shirts into belted trousers. It's not a Montessori, though.

I went to school up to age 15 in a place where uniforms were not the norm, and then moved to one where they were. At first I hated it, then I came to see the benefits.
 

drloca

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Oct 26, 2004
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I think school uniforms should be mandatory everywhere!

I certainly think the positives outweigh the negatives...and as one who went through 12 years of school wearing a uniform...;).

The one plus I see especially in a country like DR is that it minimizes the "competition" , particularly in the teen years.
 

LaTeacher

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May 2, 2008
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like everyone said, uniforms are the norm here. but i think what bothers me more are the rules that come with the clothing - haircuts are the same (no gel, no curls, no long hair for boys, no fancy barettes for girls, etc..) no earrings for boys and in some schools there is only one kind of earring the girls can wear (for example, a white plastic ball/stud) or they are restricted to post-earrings of a certain size, make up is regulated for high school girls, jewelry, too.

it's said to be a distraction, bla bla bla, to have the kids wearing/doing whatever they want.

and education here is pretty cookie cutter - it needs to be when classes are large and teachers are underpaid (and undertrained. homeschool might be your best bet if you're looking for abstract, fit-the-child education. you're hardup to find anywhere in latin america an (affordable) school tailor fitted for "unschooling"
 

drloca

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Oct 26, 2004
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like everyone said, uniforms are the norm here. but i think what bothers me more are the rules that come with the clothing - haircuts are the same (no gel, no curls, no long hair for boys, no fancy barettes for girls, etc..) no earrings for boys and in some schools there is only one kind of earring the girls can wear (for example, a white plastic ball/stud) or they are restricted to post-earrings of a certain size, make up is regulated for high school girls, jewelry, too.

it's said to be a distraction, bla bla bla, to have the kids wearing/doing whatever they want.

and education here is pretty cookie cutter - it needs to be when classes are large and teachers are underpaid (and undertrained. homeschool might be your best bet if you're looking for abstract, fit-the-child education. you're hardup to find anywhere in latin america an (affordable) school tailor fitted for "unschooling"
Children need rules! We were raised with them and turned out OK. Kids today have way too many liberties IMO and control their role models, namely teachers and parents.

Rules and respect go hand in hand .....and are both sadly lacking in today's society. When was the last time anyone saw a young person give up their seat on public transit for an elderly or disabled person?

We were not allowed ANY type of make up, nail polish, jewellery/accesories, even in high school and guess what...we actually survived;).

Like the old adage states...there is a time and a place for everything.
 
Mar 2, 2008
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Although Lambada's point about 'fitting in' as opposed to 'changing' is the overriding issue,and the issue that the original poster has to address for her/himself, the other issue of education in general are also of interest, and deserves some thoughtful consideration.

Personally, I don't see a contradiction between the principle of having set rules and uniforms, and the principle of student-centered education.

I believe both have value, and can co-exist. In fact, I believe they compliment one another. Having students (of any age) involved in their own education has been proven to facilitate an elevated of learning and achievement. The child is much more invested in the process, and therefore retains information in a much more intrinsic way.

Involving children in their education is not the same as letting them run wild. Actually, it is quite the opposite. It takes a more involved educator to facilitate child-centered learning in it does in a traditional setting. Furthermore, discipline is much more demanding and complex. It requires teamwork and dedication, and children instinctively learn the value of working within certain guidelines and expectations.

In short, the two concepts are not mutually exclusive, and in real-world application, both are necessary, in tandem, in order for either to be effective.
 

mambodog

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Feb 29, 2008
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I do understand that everyone wants the best for their own kids. But, if you are living in this country, you should also think about the poor local children who need a uniform in order to be allowed to attend public school but who cannot afford the cost.

To help these children get the opportunity for a basic education please think about supporting Sosua Kids at sosuakids.com.
 

J D Sauser

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Nov 20, 2004
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I am not a fan of uniforms... yet, in this country, where we have so deep differences of social (economy) levels, it is a life saver for many kids (and their families or sponsors) who could not keep up with the show off attitude of the few who could wrap their brats into expensive and likely stupid "designer" cloths.
Most uniforms around here are not military style... usually limited to same color shirts or polos and pants/skirts.

I think it's bearable for the kids, and in the end cheaper for most parents.

.. J-D.
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
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Have you all noticed

I am not a fan of uniforms... yet, in this country, where we have so deep differences of social (economy) levels, it is a life saver for many kids (and their families or sponsors) who could not keep up with the show off attitude of the few who could wrap their brats into expensive and likely stupid "designer" cloths.
Most uniforms around here are not military style... usually limited to same color shirts or polos and pants/skirts.

I think it's bearable for the kids, and in the end cheaper for most parents.

.. J-D.
Have not seen a word from the OP since the orginal post!. When my kids were in school here at CM the kids tried any way they could to get past the uniform requirements, but no dice, so they done the peer pressure thing with necklaces, ear rings, watchs, etc. but no label clothes. was great! Agree with the posters that think we need rules again, I remember phonics, now the kids cannot spell, but it sounds right. same thing with new math, now they all need a calculator.
 

LaTeacher

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May 2, 2008
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to clarify, i don't really have a problem with uniforms. i agree, kids need rules. but the things i mentioned - earrings, hairstyles, i think is a little extreme. Especially considering that most schools that i've had experience with won't let the girls wear earrings, but never complain about her 2-sizes too small pants and tight, bust-enhancing shirts.

i went to public school - no uniform and turned out fine. full scholarships to a well respected university along with many of my friends. my little sister however has a uniform at my same high school and she is going to community college with most of her friends. there is nothing wrong with CCs but i'm thinking a uniform and tons of dress code rules didn't make her any smarter. or a better student.

i think the OP though is probably more concerned with the type of education - same curric. and expectations for all students, grades based on standards and not progress, etc... - and less with the uniform, but the concern manifests itself in the uniform question.

there is a type of homeschooling and "progressive" education called "unschooling" which is the exact opposite of what most of us know of education. letting children gear their education toward their interests, raising curious learners and marking based on progress rather than standards (ie: in 2nd grade you must know this, this and this). it has its flaws, but let's be honest so does traditional education.
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/28730583@N02/3581796534/" title="Grade 4, 2008 Colegio San Jose by rsaunders2008, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2434/3581796534_7bcccc5cb8_b.jpg" width="1024" height="687" alt="Grade 4, 2008 Colegio San Jose" /></a>

I agree that uniforms do not make batter students, but I have observed that, at least in the younger grades the students take pride in their uniform. At Yris's school earrings are on 80% of the girls, and girls can wear pants...etc. Good luck to the OP in finding what she wants. Perhaps a homeschooling with group gatherings with other home schooled children. This seems to work for many parents that prefer something other than public/private. If you are a non-working parent with the ability to instill in your children the self discipline required to educate themselves, great. The only problem I see with this approach is that it is a competative world out there and for higher education you have to meet certain standards ( grade point average, SATS, High school graduation....etc)
 

drloca

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Oct 26, 2004
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<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/28730583@N02/3581796534/" title="Grade 4, 2008 Colegio San Jose by rsaunders2008, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2434/3581796534_7bcccc5cb8_b.jpg" width="1024" height="687" alt="Grade 4, 2008 Colegio San Jose" /></a>

I agree that uniforms do not make batter students, but I have observed that, at least in the younger grades the students take pride in their uniform. At Yris's school earrings are on 80% of the girls, and girls can wear pants...etc. Good luck to the OP in finding what she wants. Perhaps a homeschooling with group gatherings with other home schooled children. This seems to work for many parents that prefer something other than public/private. If you are a non-working parent with the ability to instill in your children the self discipline required to educate themselves, great. The only problem I see with this approach is that it is a competative world out there and for higher education you have to meet certain standards ( grade point average, SATS, High school graduation....etc)
Thanks for sharing the picture...it made my day;)
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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As someone who lives here in the DR and has children attending school, all I can say is it would be a disaster if the schools (at least public) started allowing kids to dress as they please based on the fact that even more so than in the US appearance is very important even at a young age. The hispanic culture, and Dominicans in particular, put way too much emphasis on appearance and clothes and as a case in point my 1 and a half year old daughter is already fashion conscious about her clothes and shoes. Being as most Dominicans are relatively poor one can imagine the problems if parents would have to keep up with what the Jone's kids are wearing.