Dominican Foods

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
31,271
358
0
we had miesposo's family on a sunday, bbq burgers. few days prior i made some banana ketchup (indonesian staple, apparently). i also put out homemade mango chutney among condiments. to my surprise my FIL used banana ketchup on his burger and my MIL reached for the chutney. and they liked it. so there is a bit of hope :)

i also served no bake coffee and whiskey mousse cheesecake and they liked it too.
 

keepcoming

Silver
May 25, 2011
2,787
47
48
Love a good "ensalada rusa" especially when made with beets. MIL is visiting me here, checking on her grandson (my son).Today she made ensalada rusa, berenjenas frita and meatballs (ground turkey). Enough ensalada rusa leftover to have with a grilled cheese tomorrow for lunch (my plan..lol).
 
Apr 7, 2014
2,293
0
0
DR might have some herbs and few spices but very few domincans can cook anything but the usual.  And absolutely do not seem to enjoy (yup it is the No mi gusta answer)food unless it contains what they know and most likely eat day after day. Everything that is overcooked here tastes exactly the same. Sad for them not to have any curiosity.  Food is a joy of life.
"No me gusta" is Sour Grapes. They say they dont like it because they have never been able to afford those things so they assume they arent any good anyway or wouldnt like the taste anyhow.

Seriously, you are talking to some people who live on an island who have never eaten fish. Broccoli is an export commodity but many people have never eaten it. You will meet people who will tell you dont like ice cream when they have never had it in their life, and they are close to 40 years old.
They live as McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Wendys and Burger King are luxuries(and if you look at what Dominos and Pizza Hut charge you would think they are).
Outside of certain dishes, I think most Dominican food is tasteless(lacking flavor and a distinct gastronomical pleasure). Alot of times other people use inventiveness when they adapt other peoples recipes and cuisines. Alot of Dominican adaptations just dont impress me much, like the pizza with the ham and corn and string beans or the spaguetti with the milk(and corn and gandules) in it or potato salad with beets in it.

Even in NY there is a Dominican food place on the corner of Park Place and Nostrand Ave and a Jamaican place across the street on Nostrand Ave. No comparison. The Jamaican beef stew is a huge mountain of meat and sauce on 3 types of rice available. The Dominican beef stew is a huge mount of rice, 2 available, with a smattering of beans and a couple of chunks of meat. If you are paying $6 for a small plate the Jamaican place is where you would go to get full. The Dominican place is just for nostalgia.
 
Apr 7, 2014
2,293
0
0
we had miesposo's family on a sunday, bbq burgers. few days prior i made some banana ketchup (indonesian staple, apparently). i also put out homemade mango chutney among condiments. to my surprise my FIL used banana ketchup on his burger and my MIL reached for the chutney. and they liked it. so there is a bit of hope :)

i also served no bake coffee and whiskey mousse cheesecake and they liked it too.
If you get an open mind you can introduce new stuff. Like I brought those individual tuna packets with me(2oz envelopes) and I gave them to a friend so she could have at lunch on her job, along with US style salad dressing(think WishBone, Ken's Steak House) and US baked wheat bread(Friehoffers', Arnold). She loved it.
Duncan Hines brownie mix, those Ore-Ida instant mash potatoes, the Green Giant pasta in a bag meals. Oh yea, Hunt barbecue sauce they like that too.

Sent from my Z833 using Tapatalk
 

jeb321

Bronze
Dec 12, 2008
741
4
0
"No me gusta" is Sour Grapes. They say they dont like it because they have never been able to afford those things so they assume they arent any good anyway or wouldnt like the taste anyhow.

Seriously, you are talking to some people who live on an island who have never eaten fish. Broccoli is an export commodity but many people have never eaten it. You will meet people who will tell you dont like ice cream when they have never had it in their life, and they are close to 40 years old.
They live as McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Wendys and Burger King are luxuries(and if you look at what Dominos and Pizza Hut charge you would think they are).
Outside of certain dishes, I think most Dominican food is tasteless(lacking flavor and a distinct gastronomical pleasure). Alot of times other people use inventiveness when they adapt other peoples recipes and cuisines. Alot of Dominican adaptations just dont impress me much, like the pizza with the ham and corn and string beans or the spaguetti with the milk(and corn and gandules) in it or potato salad with beets in it.

Even in NY there is a Dominican food place on the corner of Park Place and Nostrand Ave and a Jamaican place across the street on Nostrand Ave. No comparison. The Jamaican beef stew is a huge mountain of meat and sauce on 3 types of rice available. The Dominican beef stew is a huge mount of rice, 2 available, with a smattering of beans and a couple of chunks of meat. If you are paying $6 for a small plate the Jamaican place is where you would go to get full. The Dominican place is just for nostalgia.

Agree with you on just about all you mention.  Except the ice cream part.  This part of Brooklyn has so many "island folks" Jamaicans and other West Indians and the foods delicious.  Roti, curry and they will feed you so well I understand.  Unfortunately Dominicans bring their lack of culinary adventure and skills (except for a huge helping of rice) wherever they go.  They just don't get it that they are offered, at least in NYC .,. Yea Brooklyn a chance to "try it you may like it" opportunity.  I am amused by the excitement here When a Dennys, Pizza Hut opens.  I was taken aback recently driving by the Blue Mall construction to see that there will be a Pizza Hut? Advertising this Mall as upscale and this is what pizza will be offered?  Ever try a dominican version of "red sauce". Sorry that is probably another thread.
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
73
0
Agree with you on just about all you mention.  Except the ice cream part.  This part of Brooklyn has so many "island folks" Jamaicans and other West Indians and the foods delicious.  Roti, curry and they will feed you so well I understand.  Unfortunately Dominicans bring their lack of culinary adventure and skills (except for a huge helping of rice) wherever they go.  They just don't get it that they are offered, at least in NYC .,. Yea Brooklyn a chance to "try it you may like it" opportunity.  I am amused by the excitement here When a Dennys, Pizza Hut opens.  I was taken aback recently driving by the Blue Mall construction to see that there will be a Pizza Hut? Advertising this Mall as upscale and this is what pizza will be offered?  Ever try a dominican version of "red sauce". Sorry that is probably another thread.
some time ago, Empanadas Monumental announced that they were going to set up shop in NYC and other tri state locations. i sent a message to the owner, suggesting that he consider baking the crusts, rather than frying them, because Americans were touchy about certain types of foods. they will eat the worst junk, but fried empanadas are not exactly the breakfast of champions. he said he would stick with the fried motif. i wonder how he is doing these days.
 
Apr 7, 2014
2,293
0
0
some time ago, Empanadas Monumental announced that they were going to set up shop in NYC and other tri state locations. i sent a message to the owner, suggesting that he consider baking the crusts, rather than frying them, because Americans were touchy about certain types of foods. they will eat the worst junk, but fried empanadas are not exactly the breakfast of champions. he said he would stick with the fried motif. i wonder how he is doing these days.
Google says they have a few stores Uptown mostly in Dominican and Latino barrios. But he may have taken your advice though. Who knows? I know for me if you dont have them Tower or Caribbean Isle patties you aint got nothing to talk about. 25 years ago I turned my buddy, Rob, onto Jamaican food. He was from New Orleans and never knew such a thing. Every nite we would be at Kenneth's Taste Bud on Northern Blvd and 1st Street for them beef patties and cocoa bread and hot sauce.

Sent from my Z833 using Tapatalk
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
19,731
849
113
Playa Najayo & South Jersey
Computer translation:

Guava is full of nutrients that help fight disease
Jessica Bonifacio | August 19, 2017

Guava is a fruit with a great taste and pronounced odor, which besides pleasing the palate, benefits health.

It is not surprising that in a Dominican's house a guava cultivation is found, that when it is in season, children and adults are encouraged to pick them up or simply to knock them out of the woods.

The pulp of the guava has different shades, ranging from white to red, depending on its variety, whether it is ripe or green. In juices, salads, jams, ice creams, sweets, or whatever you prefer, this fruit promises to give you the properties your body needs, including iron, copper, calcium, magnesium, potassium, manganese and phosphorus.

According to nutritionists, this fruit has high doses of ascorbic acid, a compound that helps combat various degenerative diseases. Guava is also a source of fiber for the body. This fruit helps to prevent the onset of diabetes, since it is a food that slows the processes of sugar absorption in the body, so diabetic patients should include it in their usual diet.

Similarly, those who consume guava regularly have a well functioning digestive system.

http://www.elcaribe.com.do/2017/08/19/la-guayaba-esta-llena-nutrientes-ayudan-combatir-enfermedades/
 

ROLLOUT

Silver
Jan 30, 2012
2,194
30
48
Good to know, thanks. I think, however, I'll be hard pressed to find guava here in the redneck riviera .
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
31,271
358
0
few days ago i saw that jobo trees are full of fruits so today i am attempting to make jam out of it. so far so good. i don't think i ever saw anyone picking the fruits, does not seem to be very popular.
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
73
0
few days ago i saw that jobo trees are full of fruits so today i am attempting to make jam out of it. so far so good. i don't think i ever saw anyone picking the fruits, does not seem to be very popular.
what on earth is a jobo?
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
31,271
358
0
what on earth is a jobo?
Spondias mombin has several common names. Throughout the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and in Costa Rica and Mexico it is called jobo (derived from the Carib language). In El Salvador, it is called Jocote de Corona. Among the English-speaking Caribbean islands it is known as yellow mombin or hog plum, while in Jamaica it is called Spanish plum, gully plum or coolie plum. In Surinam the fruit is called Mope. In Brazil, the fruit is known by several different names, such as cajá, taperebá and ambaló. In Peru, it is known as uvos or mango ciruelo.
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
31,271
358
0
so i made jobo jam and it's quite tasty. i also prepared a more indulgent version, choco-jobo (a jam with addition of cocoa).
i also made some lime marmalade, which was quite fun. and banana jam, also pretty good.

my latest discovery is tamarillo. since it kinda tastes like tomato (and is even called tomate de arbol) i used it today to make a sauce for pasta, delicious. i am going to stock on in next time i'm in la sirena.

and i spent entire week making armenian layer cake.

is it dominican food if i cook it in DR? ;)
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
73
0
so i made jobo jam and it's quite tasty. i also prepared a more indulgent version, choco-jobo (a jam with addition of cocoa).
i also made some lime marmalade, which was quite fun. and banana jam, also pretty good.

my latest discovery is tamarillo. since it kinda tastes like tomato (and is even called tomate de arbol) i used it today to make a sauce for pasta, delicious. i am going to stock on in next time i'm in la sirena.

and i spent entire week making armenian layer cake.

is it dominican food if i cook it in DR? ;)
i see where you made a marmalade. do yourself a favor. next time tangerines are in season, make yourself some tangering marmalade. there is nothing like it..
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
73
0
Spondias mombin has several common names. Throughout the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and in Costa Rica and Mexico it is called jobo (derived from the Carib language). In El Salvador, it is called Jocote de Corona. Among the English-speaking Caribbean islands it is known as yellow mombin or hog plum, while in Jamaica it is called Spanish plum, gully plum or coolie plum. In Surinam the fruit is called Mope. In Brazil, the fruit is known by several different names, such as cajá, taperebá and ambaló. In Peru, it is known as uvos or mango ciruelo.
coolie plum? i have never seen them in this country...this is new to me..
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
31,271
358
0
so you know the fruit? there are several trees in costambar. pain in the rectum to process the fruits because they do not come off the stone like european plums do. you either have to cook them whole, sieve and then cook again or spend an hour shaving the flesh off the stone (and that would only yield one jar of jam so i do't recommend it).

i caught preserve bug so likely will continue with jams and marmalade for some time. tangerine marmalade sounds good. i will try that.
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
73
0
so you know the fruit? there are several trees in costambar. pain in the rectum to process the fruits because they do not come off the stone like european plums do. you either have to cook them whole, sieve and then cook again or spend an hour shaving the flesh off the stone (and that would only yield one jar of jam so i do't recommend it).

i caught preserve bug so likely will continue with jams and marmalade for some time. tangerine marmalade sounds good. i will try that.
oh, yes, i know it. ate a few truckloads of the in my youth. i can see where they would be a bear to work with.

tangerine marmalade, made from the outer skin, is beyond awesome. squeeze out all the juice and use it in making the product. beyond good.
 

jenmar237

New member
Aug 8, 2017
108
0
0
I always get a kick out of some foreigners' insistence with regard to Dominican empanadas being fried vs baked. Why should we change them? Is is this also asked of PR and Cuban establishments who also fry theirs? Americans have some of the unhealthiest items as staples of American food (i.e. burger and french fries) and one of the highest, if not the highest, obesity rates in the world, so this so-called touchiness regarding our empanadas being fried is a bit ridiculous and I don't believe it to be true. Dominican-style fried empanadas are very popular in the tri-state area, and no, not just with Latinos, you see many 'gringos' that live uptown eating them and when I've brought empanadas for company parties at my corporate jobs with mostly non-hispanic whites here in NY and NJand not a single one is left every time and I bring them from a local Dominican restaurant by my house.