DR breaks record with 644,861 foreign arrivals in June

Dolores

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The Ministry of Tourism (Mitur) reported on 4 July 2022 a new record in tourist arrivals for the month of June. Tourism Minister David Collado announced that 644,861 foreigners arrived in June 2022. This is 9.9% more than in June 2018 and 9.8% higher than in June 2019, the two pre-pandemic years. He attributed the increase to the total recovery of the industry due to the efforts of the public and private sectors.

Collado announced that 3,547,142 tourists have visited the country in the first half of the year. He said average hotel occupancy is at 71% with an average stay of 10 days. Punta Cana and Las Americas (Santo Domingo) airports have received the most visitors.

Collado said that there has been a sustained increase in visitors by sea. He revealed that 72,689 cruise passengers visited in June, which represents 25% more than those arriving in the...

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After a less than stellar first quarter, tourist arrivals during the second quarter did indeed set a record for June.

The question then becomes, is it sustainable as the war in Ukraine continues and a potential worldwide recession looms on the horizon?

Interestingly, the tourist arrivals from Europe have declined and continue to decline. Is it the high cost of energy there taking discretionary dollars from would be tourists, the precipitous decline of the Russian market or the rapidly declining Euro?

President Abinader, or more likely the Central Bankers, have increased borrowing rates and have effected monetary policy in the DR, such that the peso has remained solid against major currencies like the USD and EURO. Couple that interest rate policy along with the rapid decline of the EURO (1:1 against the USD briefly this morning) and it would appear there will be far less tourists coming to the DR from the Eurozone likely affected by the catalysts identified above.

I would be remiss in not noting that CCCCCCccccc must be smiling in heaven this morning as the USD/EUR briefly reached parity.............



Respectfully,
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windeguy

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half are overstayer.. good value
Collado announced that 3,547,142 tourists have visited the country in the first half of the year. He said average hotel occupancy is at 71% with an average stay of 10 days.

With the number of tourists at over three million on 6 months compared to a few thousand at most that overstay from tourist card countries, it is no wonder the government ignores those that stay longer than 30 days. They will always get to pay a small fine when they leave with no other ramifications ever.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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After a less than stellar first quarter, tourist arrivals during the second quarter did indeed set a record for June.
Yes, I will stipulate to that
The question then becomes, is it sustainable as the war in Ukraine continues and a potential worldwide recession looms on the horizon?
I don't have a crystal ball.
Nor the ability to see into the future.
But no trend line continues in one direction for time eternal.
Interestingly, the tourist arrivals from Europe have declined and continue to decline. Is it the high cost of energy there taking discretionary dollars from would be tourists, the precipitous decline of the Russian market or the rapidly declining Euro?
Dey gotta keep body parts (especially the extremities) warm.
If you figure everyone except for the world 1%ers have a budget...the money for the increased energy costs have to come from somewhere.
Many markets in the world have been in precipitous decline.
Just speaking on a personal note
I can still buy food, pay my energy bills, make it rain)
Not fun watching the market beat me like an unloved stepchild.
But as my man Boris Johnson says: "But them's the breaks."
President Abinader, or more likely the Central Bankers, have increased borrowing rates and have effected monetary policy in the DR, such that the peso has remained solid against major currencies like the USD and EURO. Couple that interest rate policy along with the rapid decline of the EURO (1:1 against the USD briefly this morning) and
:eek:📉
it would appear there will be far less tourists coming to the DR from the Eurozone likely affected by the catalysts identified above.

"Well, these are the breaks" - Kurtis Blow