DR electricity service affected by Beryl

Dolores

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Hurricane Beryl passed around 300 km from the Dominican coasts but its power bands impacted generating plants and transmission lines located in coastal areas. Many of these are temporarily off the grid for repairs.

Celso Jose Marranzini, president of the Unified Council of Electricity Power Distribution Enterprises (CUED), says the power plants that were affected were:

AES Andrés in Punta Caucedo (Santo Domingo) with 300 megavatios (MW)

Units 1,2 and 3 of Energas (Santo Domingo), each with capacity to generate 100 MW

Estrella del Mar 3 barge in Ozama River, National District with 150 MW

Karpowership in Azua with 180 MW

SIBA Energy generators with 184 MW in Boca Chica (Santo Domingo)

Parque Energético Los Minas (Santo Domingo) with 115 MW

Marranzini explained the rains caused significant damage to power distribution lines, impacting several circuits...

Continue reading...
 
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tee

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Sep 14, 2007
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I'm pretty sure a tree lizard walking across a power line has the same effect.
Edenorte, Edesur etc. are the worst companies in the DR no matter what area you live in. One drop of rain, the power goes out but had to laugh about the lizard comment, so true! Maybe in 100 years time the power lines will be placed underground like all civilized countries which would create far less power outages. There really should be no need for overhead cables within residential areas anymore. I know it has started in some areas but it is going slower than a cloth on valium!
 

Manuel01

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Apr 1, 2009
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Finally we know what caused all the electricity problems for the last 50 years.
It was Beryl this Son of a ..... LOL
 

Manuel01

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Apr 1, 2009
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Edenorte, Edesur etc. are the worst companies in the DR no matter what area you live in. One drop of rain, the power goes out but had to laugh about the lizard comment, so true! Maybe in 100 years time the power lines will be placed underground like all civilized countries which would create far less power outages. There really should be no need for overhead cables within residential areas anymore. I know it has started in some areas but it is going slower than a cloth on valium!
"will be placed underground" ... Bad Idea !!!! The waterlines are at some places buried at a debth of 2-10". Imagen the electricity lines underground !? At least that would be the first country on earth where you could wireless charge your cellphone just by walkink or driving around. LOL
 

JD Jones

Moderator:North Coast,Santo Domingo,SW Coast,Covid
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FWIW, I've gone for quite a few weeks without a power outage here in San Cristobal, including during the storm this week. ;)
 

josh2203

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Dec 5, 2013
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Edenorte, Edesur etc. are the worst companies in the DR no matter what area you live in. One drop of rain, the power goes out but had to laugh about the lizard comment, so true! Maybe in 100 years time the power lines will be placed underground like all civilized countries which would create far less power outages. There really should be no need for overhead cables within residential areas anymore. I know it has started in some areas but it is going slower than a cloth on valium!
The concept of burying cables was discussed in another thread. While that is very good for power security if it's planned and executed properly, it's really expensive and requires really really good engineering...

Keep in mind the comment on this thread about the water lines AND handing power cables as such, if also properly engineered/planned and executed are not bad at all if they would just use good cables and clean up the "bird nests" of cables present in almost every pole there is...

We're currently in Northern Scandinavia due to family reasons, and here power cables are not buried underground (hence thought of this concept in the DR as well) but obviously they are not hanging in a ridiculous way either, and I see that to be just fine... There are just 1-2 neat cables running up there, period... We just had a storm and obviously had no outage...
 

La Profe_1

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Another thought about burying cables is that doing so might cut down on the illegal connections that are so common in the DR.

Having to dig to reach the cable could be somewhat of a deterrent.
 

Jan

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I can see burying cables in new construction. What , in my opinion, would help is when working on any cable, electric or other, the old cable needs to be removed not just abandoned and left hanging. If they removed all the mess it would be easier to repair and also visually see illegal connections. Also, they need to completely finish an instillation. Close the electric boxes on the poles instead of leaving hose boxes open. I think this would help with all the utilities.
 

josh2203

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Another thought about burying cables is that doing so might cut down on the illegal connections that are so common in the DR.

Having to dig to reach the cable could be somewhat of a deterrent.
That's a very good point, however, my question is, where would you put the meters?

In Europe, where the cables are underground, the meters are in the basements, but as far as I know, basements do not really exist in the DR...
 

JD Jones

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That's a very good point, however, my question is, where would you put the meters?

In Europe, where the cables are underground, the meters are in the basements, but as far as I know, basements do not really exist in the DR...
Why do you need to see the meter? For the last 10 years or so my meter has been read electronically. That's how they're able to send you daily consumption if you wish.
 
Nov 9, 2023
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That's a very good point, however, my question is, where would you put the meters?

In Europe, where the cables are underground, the meters are in the basements, but as far as I know, basements do not really exist in the DR...
Not in my country, in almost all houses there is a shallow service closet inside next to the front door. All underground lines (electric/water/gas/internet/cable) come up there and all the breakers, meters and main shut-offs are there for easy access in one place. I also have my router and NAS in there.

In the DR it would be a gigantic infrastructure project to put everything underground but they are doing it already in most new projects and gated communities..
 

Kricke87

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Feb 16, 2021
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We're currently in Northern Scandinavia due to family reasons, and here power cables are not buried underground (hence thought of this concept in the DR as well) but obviously they are not hanging in a ridiculous way either, and I see that to be just fine... There are just 1-2 neat cables running up there, period... We just had a storm and obviously had no outage...
What are you talking about? "here power cables are not buried underground".. YES they are, obviously not the high voltage overhead power lines, but the residentials yes they are, even in many places out on the countryside.
I'm from Sweden and the powerlines are underground in residential areas in ALL mayor cities.
There are many benefits of having it underground, however as so many others have already mentioned, it requires planning and skill, two things this country does lack.
 

Farmer

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Dec 2, 2003
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Underground is a great idea. And only in new construction where you can actually get to the ground. Most older housing I see here in Sajoma is packed in so tight you'd play hell finding a place to dig. Here where I live all the electrical lines were indeed buried many years ago. Every so often they emerge into a box with several meters. Several months ago I was digging up an area to put in an herb garden and "found" the buried cable. Only a couple inches deep. As stubborn as I am I "found" it again before I was done. I had one of the government electricians who works this area come out and give me a hand and some advice. He found it too. And as has been discussed in previous threads here, he pulled out his trusty electrical tape and solved the problem. However, no plot plans exist from the original development. Nor do they possess the devices used back home to find buried cable, water lines etc. Don't think underground is gonna make much of an impact down here.
 
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You will also need a central updated database with locations and depth of all underground infrastructure and enforced consultation of that database before any other digging in those areas to prefend damage. Another challenge for the DR.
 

JD Jones

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Jan 7, 2016
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What are you talking about? "here power cables are not buried underground".. YES they are, obviously not the high voltage overhead power lines, but the residentials yes they are, even in many places out on the countryside.
I'm from Sweden and the powerlines are underground in residential areas in ALL mayor cities.
There are many benefits of having it underground, however as so many others have already mentioned, it requires planning and skill, two things this country does lack.
My apartment complex is probably close to 20 yrs old and has underground electrical wiring. Meters are in an enclosed box on the main road, but as I said before, they are read electronically so I can see my daily consumption on the EDESUR app.