DR Expels up to 700 Haitians Daily

NanSanPedro

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melphis

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Yesterday in Bavaro we saw 2 of the new immigration trucks packed full of Haitians. The best part was there was a bigger truck behind them full of crappy motos getting deported or hopefully destroyed.
 
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drstock

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Yesterday in Bavaro we saw 2 of the new immigration trucks packed full of Haitians. The best part was there was a bigger truck behind them full of crappy motos getting deported or hopefully destroyed.
The motos won't be going back with their owners. They will be held for the while by the police and then, when they are unclaimed because the owners don't dare to go the police station if they ever get back into the country, the bikes will probably "disappear".
 

drstock

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My Haitian gardener finally got his appointment to renew his long term work visa here, after months of waiting. The problem now is that his passport expired while he was waiting and he can't renew the visa with the old one. He can get a short-term replacement passport here, but to get one which will last as long as the work visa would, he would have to go back to Haiti. If he does that, he can't get back into the DR without the visa and if he crosses illegally he will probably be arrested on the way back to the North Coast. It's a Catch 22!
 
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NanSanPedro

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My Haitian gardener finally got his appointment to renew his long term work visa here, after months of waiting. The problem now is that his passport expired while he was waiting and he can't renew the visa with the old one. He can get a short-term replacement passport here, but to get one which will last as long as the work visa would, he would have to go back to Haiti. If he does that, he can't get back into the DR without the visa and if he crosses illegally he will probably be arrested on the way back to the North Coast. It's a Catch 22!
If he had a decent lawyer, would that help?
 

Auryn

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My Haitian gardener finally got his appointment to renew his long term work visa here, after months of waiting. The problem now is that his passport expired while he was waiting and he can't renew the visa with the old one. He can get a short-term replacement passport here, but to get one which will last as long as the work visa would, he would have to go back to Haiti. If he does that, he can't get back into the DR without the visa and if he crosses illegally he will probably be arrested on the way back to the North Coast. It's a Catch 22!
How long does the short term replacement last?
 

XQT

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I subscribe - here it is.. (sourced I think from Listin Diario)
Haiti’s closest neighbor, the Dominican Republic, has intensified the expulsion of Haitians – sending at least 108,000 across the shared border this year – as its leaders insist they cannot be “asked to do more” to help Haiti.

A variety of organizations have provided an array of statistics about the number returned, with differences in the time periods they compiled information.

  • Between August and October, the DR repatriated 60,204 Haitians, bringing the total number for this year to 108,436, a spokesman for the DR President’s office, Homero Figueroa, said in a Nov.9 tweet.
  • An estimated 8,660 have been sent back across the border, with 1,500 turned away, in October alone, according to GARR, which in French stands for Support Group for Repatriated and Refugees, a watchdog and advocacy group. In the October report, GARR said the repatriated include 1,732 women, 6,442 men, 79 girls and 306 boys.
  • From Oct. 17 to 24, GARR reported, at least 5,000 Haitians were returned.
  • In all, GARR stated, between 300 and 700 Haitians are returned daily from various regional cities bordering the two countries, such as Cornillon, Savanette and Fonds-Verrettes, through the land border.
GARR said the DR is also violating repatriation rules between the two countries that ban repatriation after 6 p.m.

“The places where the buses drop Haitians are not officially designated areas, which expose Haitians to multiple human’s rights violations,’’ a GARR representative said.

UN condemns, DR insists it’s been too supportive

The reports come days after the United Nations High Commissioner, Volker Turk, requested Nov. 10 that Dominican Republic president Luis Abinader stop the deportations of Haitians due to the “incessant armed violence and the systematic violations of human rights.”

In response, Abinader said the repatriation of Haitians living illegally in the country will continue and increase. He called Turk’s statements “irresponsible and unacceptable” and said “no other country in the world has been as supportive of Haiti, so the Dominican Republic cannot be asked for more.”

The exchanges between Turk and Abinader occurred just one day after the DR’s General Directorate of Migration announced it had repatriated 60,204 Haitian nationals between August 1 to October 31 through a series of nationwide operations.

Abinader said his government will not only continue with the deportations, but that it will increase them next week, the Dominican daily, El Listin Dario reported.
Always interesting to see activists spin.
Just read about criminal Haitian activities in Quebec, they are well documented.
Another big mistake of Canada to let Haitians in, and to waste millions of taxpayers money.

Illegal Haitian barrios in the DR are increasing.
I'm thankful to Abinader, for expelling illegals.
 

drstock

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If he had a decent lawyer, would that help?
Thanks for the thought. He is already using a lawyer who is trusted by Haitians here in the Cabarete area. She is going to send a letter to Immigration next week to ask what he should do, but getting a reply could take a long time, as usual. Meanwhile, he is classed as "illegal and runs the risk of arrest and deportation every day.
 

chico bill

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Thanks for the thought. He is already using a lawyer who is trusted by Haitians here in the Cabarete area. She is going to send a letter to Immigration next week to ask what he should do, but getting a reply could take a long time, as usual. Meanwhile, he is classed as "illegal and runs the risk of arrest and deportation every day.
So many run that risk daily.
The ones deported are back before the sun sets on them.

It would be best for the Dominicans to allow visas issued by the DR, tied to legit Haitian passports and obtained annually, and faster with a sponsor with a cedula.

So if you have a long time gardener, or care giver, construction worker or housekeeper or if you are a Haitian born here and you have a family member who wants to come, you become the sponsor, and their visa is linked to a cedula, phone number and address.
And they could be allowed to apply for driver's licenses (if they can pass in Spanish)
Say $400 per year renewal, if no crimes were committed and you get a clean police report.
A way of tracking and filtering those who do have some employment, is better than the revolving door now.

I think the peaceful law abiding Haitians would line up for that.
$400 is a lot to them and they would not want to blow their 'provisional' legal status.
 

bob saunders

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So many run that risk daily.
The ones deported are back before the sun sets on them.

It would be best for the Dominicans to allow visas issued by the DR, tied to legit Haitian passports and obtained annually, and faster with a sponsor with a cedula.

So if you have a long time gardener, or care giver, construction worker or housekeeper or if you are a Haitian born here and you have a family member who wants to come, you become the sponsor, and their visa is linked to a cedula, phone number and address.
And they could be allowed to apply for driver's licenses (if they can pass in Spanish)
Say $400 per year renewal, if no crimes were committed and you get a clean police report.
A way of tracking and filtering those who do have some employment, is better than the revolving door now.

I think the peaceful law abiding Haitians would line up for that.
$400 is a lot to them and they would not want to blow their 'provisional' legal status.
Yes, or something similar.
 

drstock

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So many run that risk daily.
The ones deported are back before the sun sets on them.

It would be best for the Dominicans to allow visas issued by the DR, tied to legit Haitian passports and obtained annually, and faster with a sponsor with a cedula.

So if you have a long time gardener, or care giver, construction worker or housekeeper or if you are a Haitian born here and you have a family member who wants to come, you become the sponsor, and their visa is linked to a cedula, phone number and address.
And they could be allowed to apply for driver's licenses (if they can pass in Spanish)
Say $400 per year renewal, if no crimes were committed and you get a clean police report.
A way of tracking and filtering those who do have some employment, is better than the revolving door now.

I think the peaceful law abiding Haitians would line up for that.
$400 is a lot to them and they would not want to blow their 'provisional' legal status.
They can't necessarily come straight back, if they don't have access to the money to pay the bribes to pay to the checkpoints along the way, but many do come back.

As for the sponsorship idea - I like it. I would certainly sponsor my guy.
 

NALs

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A couple of more Haitians were captured in La Romana and deported. One was a leader of one of the criminal gangs in Haiti. How many are roaming through Sosúa, Cabarete, Punta Cana, etc? How many have walked by DR1 expats?

 
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drstock

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A couple of more Haitians were captured in La Romana and deported. One was a leader of one of the criminal gangs in Haiti. How many are roaming through Sosúa, Cabarete, Punta Cana, etc? How many have walked by DR1 expats?
We'll never know the answers to those questions, any more than we'll know how many criminals from other countries are seeking refuge among us.

It's excellent that major Haitian criminals like the one in the video are being arrested. It's just a shame that there is no better solution for honest, hard working Haitians who are living peaceful, productive lives here.
 

Auryn

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A couple of more Haitians were captured in La Romana and deported. One was a leader of one of the criminal gangs in Haiti. How many are roaming through Sosúa, Cabarete, Punta Cana, etc? How many have walked by DR1 expats?

I’d bet I’ve walked past more criminals from Venezuela, Russia, Poland, Germany, Canada, and the US while in any of those 3 places, any given year.

Sosua in particular.
 

NALs

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I’d bet I’ve walked past more criminals from Venezuela, Russia, Poland, Germany, Canada, and the US while in any of those 3 places, any given year.

Sosua in particular.
Certainly, but any one that notices the cureent situation in Haiti with the gangs will notice that these aren't criminals from Venezuela, Rusdia, Poland, etc. Yet, unlike in those countries, Haiti has been plunged into a new security crisis, especially around Port-au-Prince by criminal gangs headed by essentially Haitians. Now these same Haitian leaders are being found in the DR.

It's simply not the same to be surrounded by criminals from Poland, Germany, Canada or the USA when those countries aren't suffering from things such as their upper clases leaving en masse to other countries in search of better security. Even the DR isn't to such level on account of its own Dominican criminals. It's the Haitian criminal gangs that have done that to Haiti.

At some level it's comical how some here want to pretend everything is one and the same. I say if this continue as it is (or gets worst) it's a matter of time when an expat somewhere in the DR becomes the first victim of these "leaders from Haiti." Hopefully it will not be an expat from DR1, but time will tell.
 
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Auryn

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Certainly, but any one that notices the cureent situation in Haiti with the gangs will notice that these aren't criminals from Venezuela, Rusdia, Poland, etc. Yet, unlike in those countries, Haiti has been plunged into a new security crisis, especially around Port-au-Prince by criminal gangs headed by essentially Haitians. Now these same Haitian leaders are being found in the DR.

It's simply not the same to be surrounded by criminals from Poland, Germany, Canada or the USA when those countries aren't suffering from things such as their upper clases leaving en masse to other countries in search of better security. Even the DR isn't to such level on account of its own Dominican criminals. It's the Haitian criminal gangs that have done that to Haiti.

At some level it's comical how some here want to pretend everything is one and the same. I say if this continue as it is (or gets worst) it's a matter of time when an expat somewhere in the DR becomes the first victim of these "leaders from Haiti." Hopefully it will not be an expat from DR1, but time will tell.
No where in my post do I indicate that anything is the “same as Haiti”, and no one here would assume that from my post.

You’re not an expat. Why on earth would you feel it’s in any way appropriate to make this type of comment?

Abhorrent from any poster let alone a bloody moderator.
 
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XQT

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No where in my post do I indicate that anything is the “same as Haiti”, and no one here would assume that from my post.

You’re not an expat. Why on earth would you feel it’s in any way appropriate to make this type of comment?

Abhorrent from any poster let alone a bloody moderator.

Must be great to live in your fairytale land.

If you're on the N.Cost get out into the barrios from Gaspar Hernandez to P.P.
There are thousands of Haitian communities on the outskirts.
Many aided by missionaries, made up of illegals.
The arguing and fighting goes on in a daily base.
Overburdening od Dominican medical clinics and hospitals.
The few organized Haitians are swarming like sharks and vultures around tourist centres.

Do you have any real life experience?
I have worked and met with many civil war refugees.

From Haiti, Lebanon, Syria, Russia, Ukraine, Afghanistan, Iran and many more.
These people are deeply mentally damaged, just to survive in those environment's.
They cannot overcome this mindset and function as normal human beings.

Their problems are imported into countries around the world.
Look at Haitian ganga in Canada/Quebec.

You may find some German criminals at Seahorse Ranch, hiding out with great security as reported by media.
Hope they and other affluent criminals are found and extradited by Interpol.
However this has nothing to do with the Haitian criminals in the DR.

By the way the Overstay Tax booth is clearly indicated in DR airports and very efficiently administered.
Cameras, three receipts, system works perfectly.

Now the DR has to get control of illegal Haitians, regardless what foreign activists are saying.
Of course every foreign government is welcome to give as much aid to Haiti as they like........anyone???