DR & PR at night

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
20,008
1,304
113
South Coast
A photo is worth 1,000 words, click to enlarge:

15826388_10211839311758922_6366856451541364864_n.jpg
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
33,640
1,540
113
Glad I am in D.R. and not P.R.

And despite the lack of light, I do agree. Everything in life is a trade off. Living in PR is one that I had not really considered and after visiting PR that choice is off the table, light or not light.
 

bigbird

Gold
May 1, 2005
7,375
162
0
What does the photo proves?

Not sure if it was really meant to prove anything. I think everyone is aware of the luz problem in la rep dom but the darker areas seem to be less populated areas of the DR. Quite difficult for a single light bulb to penetrate a zinc roof.

 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
78
0
Not sure if it was really meant to prove anything. I think everyone is aware of the luz problem in la rep dom but the darker areas seem to be less populated areas of the DR. Quite difficult for a single light bulb to penetrate a zinc roof.


if it looks like that during the night, that is the way it looks during the day. it is mind boggling to contemplate the degree of lost productivity in these days of electrically powered capital goods.*
 

london777

Bronze
Dec 22, 2005
774
18
18
if it looks like that during the night, that is the way it looks during the day. it is mind boggling to contemplate the degree of lost productivity in these days of electrically powered capital goods.*
Light that is visible from space is wasted light. The DR is to be congratulated on its energy conservation. Indeed, not expending energy is a Dominican characteristic.
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
78
0
Light that is visible from space is wasted light. The DR is to be congratulated on its energy conservation. Indeed, not expending energy is a Dominican characteristic.

so you are suggesting that the people in the densely populated areas do not know how to conserve electricity, but those in the areas depicted on the map as lightless know how to.

all righty then.
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
78
0
You like that?
Do you wake up , look in the mirror, and say, lemme find a simple thread on dr1 to pour gas on?

i fail to understand how suggesting that the absence of light might suggest an absence of electricity is pouring gas on a thread. maybe you are just looking to start a fight.
 

zoomzx11

Gold
Jan 21, 2006
7,613
255
83
Relax, it's tongue in cheek. It's not just the lack of lights in the night. It's the near total lack of basic services that can be maddening in the DR. I have never lived where you need to spend so much time and effort traipsing back and forth to offices in order to have electricity, water, cable tv, Internet and garbage collection. It nearly drove me mad until I gave in and accepted it, realizing there was absolutely nothing I could change other than my attitude. There are lots of other wonderful aspects of living in the DR that almost make the lack of services tolerable. My saving grace is that I have been told I do my best work in the dark.
 

Dolores1

DR1
May 3, 2000
8,216
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www.
Actually, what could initially be seen as a negative… being less lit up than Puerto Rico… is more of a positive. We have less "light pollution."

From the Dark Skies Awareness website:
"The adverse effects of light pollution extend well beyond astronomy. New research suggests that light at night may interfere with normal circadian rhythms—the 24-hour cycle of day and night that humans have used to maintain health and regulate their activities for thousands of years. Light trespass, occurring when streetlights or a neighbor’s security light directs unwanted lighting onto our property or into our homes, contributes to a loss of natural darkness. Wildlife, too, is harmed by the unnecessary brightening of the night. From newly hatched sea turtles to migrating birds, fish, frogs, salamanders, and lightning bugs, artificial night lighting disrupts the cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. While research is still ongoing, it is becoming apparent that both bright days and dark nights are necessary to maintain healthy hormone production, cell function, and brain activity, as well as normal feeding, mating, and migratory behavior for many species, including humans."
 

the gorgon

Platinum
Sep 16, 2010
33,997
78
0
Actually, what could initially be seen as a negative… being less lit up than Puerto Rico… is more of a positive. We have less "light pollution."

From the Dark Skies Awareness website:
"The adverse effects of light pollution extend well beyond astronomy. New research suggests that light at night may interfere with normal circadian rhythms—the 24-hour cycle of day and night that humans have used to maintain health and regulate their activities for thousands of years. Light trespass, occurring when streetlights or a neighbor’s security light directs unwanted lighting onto our property or into our homes, contributes to a loss of natural darkness. Wildlife, too, is harmed by the unnecessary brightening of the night. From newly hatched sea turtles to migrating birds, fish, frogs, salamanders, and lightning bugs, artificial night lighting disrupts the cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. While research is still ongoing, it is becoming apparent that both bright days and dark nights are necessary to maintain healthy hormone production, cell function, and brain activity, as well as normal feeding, mating, and migratory behavior for many species, including humans."

although i have no scientific *expertise in this area, i tend to agree with a lot of this posting. i know, for example, that if i fall asleep with the lights on, and sleep through the night, the next day i feel like crap. so, even though i got a nominal night?s rest, the effects of light on my nocturnal metabolism were negative.
 
Jan 7, 2016
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Having just returned from Puerto Rico, I can tell you that the place is a 24 hour party zone. Lights everywhere, usually with nobody home. Who pays for all this? Certainly not the locals, not to Island Govt., but ultimately the U.S. Taxpayers who routinely bail-out the Puerto Rican Govt. to the tune of billions of U.S. Dollars. The people have no respect for their "keeper"!