Economics / International Affairs

Gimabella

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hey everyone just a quick question:

what can someone do in the DR with a BA in Economics and an MA in International Relations? or a MA in Political science with a concentraton in International Relations

would a JD degree do any good aswell?

i'm in the process of completing my BA in economics and am debating on what i should get my MA on i'm tired of business so i'm not really thinking about an MBA or anything else within the Business educational world.


note: i already have an AAS in Business magmt and Marketing..and will have a BA ineconomics i think thats enough for the business section for me.

i figured if i broaden my education fields then i'd probably have better options..

thanks, Gimabella


just wondering...
 

Bartolomeo67

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Hi Gima,
I guess you could find yourself a job as lecturer/professor at a DR university if that's what interests you. I have seen it done by friends of mine in other developing countries: one was a civil engineer and teaches informatics at a university in Africa, another one with an international business management degree lectures economics in Cura?ao.
You could also apply at an international institution like IMF, WorldBank, UNDP, FAO, WHO, but they may just as well send you to Chile, or worse Haiti.
Maybe you could be managing a project in the DR for an NGO.
just brainstorming here...
Bartolomeo
 

Gimabella

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Bartolomeo67 said:
Hi Gima,
I guess you could find yourself a job as lecturer/professor at a DR university if that's what interests you. I have seen it done by friends of mine in other developing countries: one was a civil engineer and teaches informatics at a university in Africa, another one with an international business management degree lectures economics in Cura?ao.
You could also apply at an international institution like IMF, WorldBank, UNDP, FAO, WHO, but they may just as well send you to Chile, or worse Haiti.
Maybe you could be managing a project in the DR for an NGO.
just brainstorming here...
Bartolomeo
Hey, thanks for ur response..ive concidered teaching at the University level in the DR i'm sure it will be a nice opportunity, but there is only one problem : i've never taught before..i know spanish perfectly well, and am sure i can speak to anyone regardelss of background, class, and way of speaking i';m sure i can fiti in aywhere with everyone else..

the reason on why i ask is because i've given moving to the Dr SDQ area a lot of thought and am really thnking about moving the only thinking still keeping me in NY is completing my BA and the current situation in the country, i wouldn't want to go and see the country doing bad and not benifiting me at all....some of you may have read few of my posts asking ramdom questions but its beacause i really want to leave to the DR

i'm thinking about getting my MA in International Relations it will take me about a year to finish and while i do this here iu can give the DR more time to get better..and i can save more $$$ formy use in the DR....

what can i possibly do with a BA in Economics? should i stay within the business or do what i've been thinking about, leave the business world and shoot for my MA in Int.Affairs....atleast i'll have a broader educational background...

PLEASE NOTE: I have no Sankie, novio, jevo, amante, marido, chijo, husband, none of that which may be making me think of moving,i have been thinkin gbaout going to th eDr to live since i was aboput 18 and i am know 22,,i just want to go becuase i have a speacial interest on living in the DR , am sick of NY and feel i can manage to live in DR ...
 

gringosabroso

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English?? Native language??

Food for thought: think about giving some very, very serious efforts to improving your English punctuation & grammar. Whoever reads your resume, letters of application, etc. will probably be a native English speaker & well educated to very well educated. Your written English will, I fear, make negative impiressions among people with these backgrounds. 1st impressions are powerful & lasting! Food for though? Good luck.
 

Gimabella

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pero Dios Mio Sueltame

gringosabroso said:
Food for thought: think about giving some very, very serious efforts to improving your English punctuation & grammar. Whoever reads your resume, letters of application, etc. will probably be a native English speaker & well educated to very well educated. Your written English will, I fear, make negative impiressions among people with these backgrounds. 1st impressions are powerful & lasting! Food for though? Good luck.

look i don't mean to be rude at all, i am a true sweetheart and can be very pleasent

but..

.excuse me if i'm wrong, i don't know if i have misinterpreted your message, but from what i have read you have critisized my writing, if i want someone to check my grammer then i would write about my grammer , i have posted this for advice, not to have someone teach me about punctuation,,if i don't ask about my grammer then don't waste your time responding to critisize my grammer.....

i think my writing is pretty well...whether you like it or not that's your issue..i may sound Spanish when i write even though i have NEVER taken a class in Spanish nor have lived in the DR ,but thats me, but i can't deny my race nor my nationality, nor am i ashamed of my Latina ways within my writing and i refuse to change it,..i'm not saying that you said that i sound spanish but just in case,

thanks anyways, i'll keep your advice for future reference..

if i were you i would also check my grammer..this is spelled wrong (impiressions ) this is how you spell it (impressions)

not to be a B*t** but i've had a very long week,
and i had the same conversation in class last night, about accent reduction in a gender nationality class where my classmates and i were debating on whether latins should reduce ther spanish accent and if possible deny their latin ways to please the Americano/Gringo with in corporate America...

( no offense)...i tottaly disagreed..

gimabella
 
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thepiper

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Mi amor bello cogelo suave. Que tu eres demasiada dama para preocuparte por lo que dice un saltapatra. OK feliz fin de semana. ;)
 

A.J.

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Gimabella

Figure out what you want for yourself then make it happen. If your goal is to be a university professor then outline that goal and make it happen anywhere.

One thing you will have to consider after getting your advanced degree is the debt you will accrue if you were not able to get grants and scholarships for the whole thing. It can be difficult to pay off that debt on peso wages.

Next time you are down in the DR go to one of the Univeristies and see if there is anyone you can connect with.

AJ

One note: I read you message and understood what you were looking for but was very distracted by all of the misspellings and misplaced punctuation. I understand you had a hard week but it hurt my eyes.
 

Bartolomeo67

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Gimabella said:
Hey, thanks for ur response..ive concidered teaching at the University level in the DR i'm sure it will be a nice opportunity, but there is only one problem : i've never taught before..i know spanish perfectly well, and am sure i can speak to anyone regardelss of background, class, and way of speaking i';m sure i can fiti in aywhere with everyone else..
I don't think dominican professors ever taught before either when they were your age or just starting their career, I wouldn't worry too much about it.
Gimabella said:
what can i possibly do with a BA in Economics? should i stay within the business or do what i've been thinking about, leave the business world and shoot for my MA in Int.Affairs....atleast i'll have a broader educational background...
imo, it's not your number of (business) degrees that will make you successful in dominican business but your connections to business people and your previous business experiences.
Gimabella said:
PLEASE NOTE: I have no Sankie, novio, jevo, amante, marido, chijo, husband, none of that which may be making me think of moving,i have been thinkin gbaout going to th eDr to live since i was aboput 18 and i am know 22,,i just want to go becuase i have a speacial interest on living in the DR , am sick of NY and feel i can manage to live in DR
imo, that's the best way to do it. You have to want to make the move for yourself, for your personal self-realization, to be a happier person, not for a lover.
Bartolomeo
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
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only if you want the job

Gimabella said:
and i had the same conversation in class last night, about accent reduction in a gender nationality class where my classmates and i were debating on whether latins should reduce ther spanish accent and if possible deny their latin ways to please the Americano/Gringo with in corporate America...
gimabella

If the Gringo is the one doing the hiring, and his clients want or need to speak to a rep with little or no accent thats part of the job requirement. How many newsanchors do you hear that have an accent at all. very few.

gringos do the samething about their southern or midwest accents when they go north or east.

Not saying loose the latin way, but may need to work on a really thick accent
 

MaineGirl

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Jun 23, 2002
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Well, if you like school...

If you really like school, keep on going and get the Master's degree.

Or get a job and some experience. You may change your mind about what you really want to prove you are a master of.

I applied to MFA programs out of college (Fine Arts) and ultimately took a job teaching (I had no education degree--I was an artist). Now I am ready to go for my M.Sc. (in education)--a choice that at 22 I would never have made (and now I consider myself an artist and a teacher).

It is hard to know where to go right after school, so try and pick something you feel you will enjoy and gain experience at the same time.

Sorry if there is no DR relevance, I just feel like giving advice since I am so wise and old :cross-eye Oh and one of my closest friends from school went right on and got her MFA. She is now teaching at a university but she says she looks at those years in grad school as one big grind.
 

CanadianCutie22

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I know where you are coming from Gimabella.

I too will soon be a business graduate-HBComm majoring in Human Resources/Industrial Relations. Although I still have one more year left of my undergrad, my thoughts have turned to what to do after graduation.

There is (and possibly always will be) the far off fantasy of mine to move to the Dominican Republic and find this great job working in Santiago. I really do not know how realistic this would be, given my credentials, but I figure I'll wait and see where I am at a year and a half from now.

Currently I have been looking into various MBA programs offered in the Dominican Republic. Although I am not sure if an MBA would really be a job clincher? My dream job would be working in a HR department, starting off in an entry-level position and working my way up. Anyone have any thoughts on the reality of this? Would you think that an MBA is required?

I'm assuming that job hunting in the DR is much the same as job hunting here with alot of positions requiring previous practical experience. To which I am also looking at various post-grad college programs here in Canada which offer job placements as part of the curriculum and which focus more on skills then theory. ie) HRIS

Although I am currently not fluent in spanish, it is my minor. Hopefully 3 years of University-level spanish and possibly some courses in the DR will help. I know its all about the practice but its difficult to find people to practice with in Small Town Northern Ontario. ;)

Alright. I guess that is all for now. I just wanted to voice my concerns and possibly get some thoughts from those people who live there.

Oh and just for the record, a sankie is not the motivator behind my thoughts either.

Cheers,

Dawn
 

Snuffy

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Gimabella said:
look i don't mean to be rude at all, i am a true sweetheart and can be very pleasent

but..

.excuse me if i'm wrong, i don't know if i have misinterpreted your message, but from what i have read you have critisized my writing, if i want someone to check my grammer then i would write about my grammer , i have posted this for advice, not to have someone teach me about punctuation,,if i don't ask about my grammer then don't waste your time responding to critisize my grammer.....

i think my writing is pretty well...whether you like it or not that's your issue..i may sound Spanish when i write even though i have NEVER taken a class in Spanish nor have lived in the DR ,but thats me, but i can't deny my race nor my nationality, nor am i ashamed of my Latina ways within my writing and i refuse to change it,..i'm not saying that you said that i sound spanish but just in case,

thanks anyways, i'll keep your advice for future reference..

if i were you i would also check my grammer..this is spelled wrong (impiressions ) this is how you spell it (impressions)

not to be a B*t** but i've had a very long week,
and i had the same conversation in class last night, about accent reduction in a gender nationality class where my classmates and i were debating on whether latins should reduce ther spanish accent and if possible deny their latin ways to please the Americano/Gringo with in corporate America...

( no offense)...i tottaly disagreed..

gimabella
He was trying to give you good, real world advice and you slapped him in the face. That is a typical young American woman's attitude. Truth is, sorry to tell you this, he is right. You will only go so far in your career without improving your grammer. "I think my writing is pretty "well"". Say that in an interview and you will be showed to the door. You are young. It is better to scrap the attitude and stay humble. Take constructive criticism as just that and not as disrespect. A major problem in America today is the fact that colleges and universities have become just another business. They will take your money, push you through school, and leave you without a proper education. My advice...take a few English grammer classes....ask good friends to correct your grammer when you speak incorrectly....and take constructive criticism with appreciation.
 

MaineGirl

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Snuff hit the nail on the head when he says that colleges and universities are just another business. Which is why I recommend getting a job before forking over a lot more cash....

by the way, have you looked into the field of planning? Urban planning or community development? You might find an inroad to your beloved DR in that field.

Are you fluent in Spanish?
 

Naufrago

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Hi Giambella,

If you're bilingual Spanish/English and have your degrees in Marketing and Economics, I think you're off to great start! I would usually say that a JD is a great idea, but down here the law is vastly different, so I'm not sure such an investment in time and money would really pay off. I was a lawyer in the US and though it's an asset here it's probably not the best return for all the years and money invested. It would probably be a good idea at this stage of your career to invest some time in the experience section of your resume. School is great but at the masters level sometimes it's better to know exactly what you want before getting stuck in some specialized niche. After school I really believe success is more about the opportunities that you find, rather than the ideas you pursue. I am finding opportunities in the DR that I might not have thought about before. Keep an open mind, and your sense of adventure intact. Networking is the key, and taking any job of interest is an important first step. One thing will always lead to another, and you never know where you're going to end up. I love it down here, and I believe there are some great opportunities awaiting you wherever you go, It's totally about your attitude and perserverance. Good Luck with everything. Ignore the negativity that some posters represent, better yet take it all in with a grain of salt.
 
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faer

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Jan 6, 2005
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ever been to Chile???

Bartolomeo67 said:
Hi Gima,
.....You could also apply at an international institution like IMF, WorldBank, UNDP, FAO, WHO, but they may just as well send you to Chile, or worse Haiti.
Maybe you could be managing a project in the DR for an NGO.
just brainstorming here...
Bartolomeo
Sorry, but I feel you have never been to Chile....the best kept secret of S.America (said by our CEO mexican born, former Citibank DR manager Nicole Reich), best economy performance, politically stable, no domestic crisis, low criminality rates, mediterranean weather, skiing in winter just 40 minutes away from Santiago (capital), beaches & surfing at 1.5 hour drive also from santiago,
Main issue, air polution (smog) in Santiago at winter season....
But you can't put it together with Haiti...Chile is at top from all latin american countries in terms of life quality...
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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faer said:
Sorry, but I feel you have never been to Chile....the best kept secret of S.America (said by our CEO mexican born, former Citibank DR manager Nicole Reich), best economy performance, politically stable, no domestic crisis, low criminality rates, mediterranean weather, skiing in winter just 40 minutes away from Santiago (capital), beaches & surfing at 1.5 hour drive also from santiago,
Main issue, air polution (smog) in Santiago at winter season....
But you can't put it together with Haiti...Chile is at top from all latin american countries in terms of life quality...
I don't think it was meant the way you read it, faer. The poster's point was that Gima might want to work in the DR, but an international institution could send her anywhere. I think Chile was mentioned at random, perhaps because of its distance from the DR, while Haiti was used as an example of a place few people would choose to live in. Correct me if I am wrong, Bartolomeo67!

Ya que estoy aqui, let me inform the OP (if she is interested in this area of work) and others who think that someone fresh from university can walk into a high-ranking job with one of these international organisations. It is rare. There might be some graduate recruitment schemes but in my experience you have to have notched up some relevant hands-on experience in a related field before they will consider you.

It's a frustrating situation to be in and I went through it myself when I was a recent graduate: you have to have experience to get a job, but you have to have a job to get experience.

Some highly qualified people get in by starting in a job way below their capacity, like administration, with the aim of working their way up. It doesn't always work as they get pigeonholed as a secretary and aren't taken seriously. But there are exceptions of course. I can think of a couple of former administrators where I worked whose potential was recognised and they were heading country programmes in Africa within a couple of years.

Others go the voluntary route (if there's such an option in the organisation in question). The most reliable way in, IMO, is to get private sector experience first. Make a point of reading and studying international development issues, and combine it with investigative travel.
 

ricktoronto

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Jan 9, 2002
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Snuffy said:
My advice...take a few English grammer classes....ask good friends to correct your grammer when you speak incorrectly....and take constructive criticism with appreciation.
At some point in this discussion it would be great to see someone spell "grammar" correctly. Ironic though.

All humour aside, I agree it was amazingly bad both spelling and grammar and I would bin this in a resume on page one.
 

Snuffy

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ricktoronto said:
At some point in this discussion it would be great to see someone spell "grammar" correctly. Ironic though.

All humour aside, I agree it was amazingly bad both spelling and grammar and I would bin this in a resume on page one.
You got me there, Rick. But this young lady is a good person. She will go far. She wrote me a nice PM with an open mind. I may have been a bit sarcastic but I would hate to see her English get in the way of all her hard work.
 

Bartolomeo67

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faer,
my comment had nothing to do with the quality of life in Chile. I know very well that Chile's economy is in a much better state than the DR's.
I only wanted to point out that an international institution could send her anywhere while she is just interested in moving to the DR. Chile was an example of a far away country and Haiti of something close, but certainly not what you would expect to get.
In the '90s I took exams to be economic representative of my country, Belgium, abroad, I took various language tests including spanish, all this hoping to be sent to any latin country. Two years later I received mail that they had an opening for me in Seoul, South Korea. If I would have spent at least 5 years in Korea, than I could have a say in where my next post would be. But I refused, I wasn't interested and Asia was in full economic crisis as well at that time.
Bartolomeo

faer said:
Sorry, but I feel you have never been to Chile....the best kept secret of S.America (said by our CEO mexican born, former Citibank DR manager Nicole Reich), best economy performance, politically stable, no domestic crisis, low criminality rates, mediterranean weather, skiing in winter just 40 minutes away from Santiago (capital), beaches & surfing at 1.5 hour drive also from santiago,
Main issue, air polution (smog) in Santiago at winter season....
But you can't put it together with Haiti...Chile is at top from all latin american countries in terms of life quality...
 

Gimabella

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Snuffy said:
You got me there, Rick. But this young lady is a good person. She will go far. She wrote me a nice PM with an open mind. I may have been a bit sarcastic but I would hate to see her English get in the way of all her hard work.

Thanks to all who have taken their time to respond to my post, a bit controversial, but i got what i needed..which is the main important thing, one more thing - i was also able to learn something new about my self which i will take into consideration in the near future...you guys are the collest, well most of you atleast,,,,jejje...

Gimabella

please feel free to continue posting, i'd like to no more about what the rest of you all think regarding Economics and International Relations as a combiniation within a professional environment...

gimabella