El español dominicano

Marianopolita

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I am used to it I by now. Concerning the video, I think they both speak quite clearly, but the man speech pattern sounds more typical to my ear.

I am sure you hear a lot of Spanish on a regular basis.

What is your comparison with what you hear? E.g. Dominican vs Puerto Rican vs Mexican
 

Africaida

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I am sure you hear a lot of Spanish on a regular basis.

What is your comparison with what you hear? E.g. Dominican vs Puerto Rican vs Mexican

Puerto Rican or the ones that I hear/speak to here, are rarely natives so their Spanish is very anglicized (some of them, to be honest, I may speak better than them), but I distinguish them with their "r" which is harsher in my opinion. For a long time, I could distinguish between Caribbean and others, but could not distinguish between islands. Now, with exposure, it s obvious, although I think Cuban and Dominican sound alike, their "musicality" is very different.

A good friend of mine is mexican and we speak in Spanish, she is easy to understand, but if I overhear Mexican workers speaking among themselves can be a bit more challenging as they have their own slang. Surprisingly, the ones that gives me a harder time are Argentinians (not all, some).

Whomever, I speak to, they can tell I learned Spanish speaking with Dominican despite my french accent (but I think it's my choice of words) :D
 
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Marianopolita

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Puerto Rican or the ones that I hear/speak to here, are rarely natives so their Spanish is very anglicized (some of them, to be honest, I may speak better than them), but I distinguish them with their "r" which is harsher in my opinion. For a long time, I could distinguish between Caribbean and others, but couldn't point out which island. Now, it s obvious, although I think Cuban and Dominican sound alike, their "musicality" is very different.

A good friend of mine is mexican and we speak in Spanish, she is easy to understand, but if I overhear mexican workers speaking among themselves can be a bit more challenging as they have their own slang.

Whomever, I speak to, they can tell I learned Spanish speaking with Dominican despite my french accent (but I think it's my choice of words) :D

I definitely think there is difference between Boricua Spanish from the island vs. Nueva York. Also Puerto Rican Spanish has the most R to L change out of the Antilles Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries.

Mexican Spanish especially DF (Distrito Federal) has a distinct intonation and rhythm. Once you recognize it you won’t miss it. Mexican Spanish has a lot words that are indigenous from nahuatal that you will not hear anywhere else in the Spanish-speaking world. They say mande a lot.

There are many similarities in speech and accent in the Antilles. Sometimes it is hard to differentiate speakers. For example, Cuban vs Dominican, Dominican vs Puerto Rican. The vocabulary and expressions are a give away but sometimes it’s incredible. Just this past weekend I was doing errands and I was listening to two Spanish speakers, grandmother and granddaughter. I could not figure out where they were from. I listened to their intonation, pronoun usage, words etc. I could not figure it out and after fifteen minutes I thought maybe Perú but I should have asked them just to test my listening skills.

Africaida definitely. You will be influenced by the Spanish you hear around you. If you are around Dominicans and you are engaged in your learning (I know that) you will be influenced by the Dominican speech you hear.
 

Africaida

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I definitely think there is difference between Boricua Spanish from the island vs. Nueva York. Also Puerto Rican Spanish has the most R to L change out of the Antilles Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries.

I spent a lot of times in PR, went for a summer semester in UPR-Mayaguez, I am not even sure how I managed at the times, lol. But, it was the perfect transition as most people are bilingual.
 

Marianopolita

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I spent a lot of times in PR, went for a summer semester in UPR-Mayaguez, I am not even sure how I managed at the times, lol. But, it was the perfect transition as most people are bilingual.

I did some translation studies in San Juan. I had a really good professor. We got along very well. He was very complementary and we had a lot linguistic observations to share about Spanish and Spanish in the Caribbean.

I did not hear a lot of English or bilingualism in PR at all.
 
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Africaida

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I did some translation studies in San Juan. I had a really good professor. We got along very well. He was very complementary and we had a lot linguistic observations to share about Spanish and Spanish in the Caribbean.

I did not hear a lot of English or bilingualism in PR at all.

Some of the books were in English. Students could speak decent English, so they would switch if I had a hard time (never among themselves of course). I thought before going there that everyone would be bilingual, but it's not the case indeed.
Loved San Juan, good friend of mine has a well-known French restaurant.
 

Marianopolita

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Some of the books were in English. Students could speak decent English, so they would switch if I had a hard time (never among themselves of course). I thought before going there that everyone would be bilingual, but it's not the case indeed.
Loved San Juan, good friend of mine has a well-known French restaurant.

I think it is a myth that Puerto Ricans on the island are bilingual. Quite the opposite. I know Puerto Ricans that left the island and moved to Miami and Orlando and never learned English because in those cities it is not necessary.
 
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Marianopolita

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Everyday words in DR that are Taíno origin.

85764300-C3A0-4D91-9439-E7C7ABDDAED4.gif



 
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Marianopolita

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Here is a video with live examples of la jerga dominicana. Other than the spelling of some of the words the examples reflect contemporary slang. (Mamacita is the correct spelling and not mamasita which is all over the internet 🤦🏻‍♀️)

 

Marianopolita

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Here is a short list of Dominican slang words. The explanations of meaning and usage should be helpful if you never really knew what these words meant in DR.


 
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Marianopolita

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Well, this You Tuber is quite lively. She talks about a lot of daily expressions heard in the DR. I laughed at the way she talked about one of them. So true! This You Tuber speaks quite clearly and typically Dominican.

Can you guess what part of DR she is from just by listening to the way she speaks? She does mention where she is from in the DR but test your own listening skills.

 
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Marianopolita

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This You Tuber has the authentic Dominican lingo down pat which includes slang and regionalisms. I liked the part where he said- it’s difficult (unlikely) that you will hear a Dominican say un poco. I agree 100%. It’s always un chin.


 
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El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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Well, this You Tuber is quite lively. She talks about a lot of daily expressions heard in the DR. I laughed at the way she talked about one of them. So true! This You Tuber speaks quite clearly and typically Dominican.

Can you guess what part of DR she is from just by listening to the way she speaks? She does mention where she is from in the DR but test your own listening skills.

Nice teeth

"En mi kikeya"
 
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Marianopolita

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From the ubiquitous ¿KLK?, or ¿Qué lo que?, to Dime a vé (Dime a ver) and Dame lu (dame luz), we can skip all formality and go for the gusto: What's up with you? What's the latest? What's cooking?

I thought the video was good. More examples would have been helpful. Just like PR Spanish many people find DR Spanish difficult to understand.
 

kenshireen

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I am from US but have a solid knowledge of Latin American Spanish

My Domincan GF always says "aser" and I went nuts trying to figure what that word was.
She used it over and over again. Finally i figured she means hacer and I told her that but she still says aser

Is this common?
Also when she means to use the word nos she writes no... and that really messed me up

There are other words that I figure out by myself using deductive reasoning:)

Is this the sign of a lack of education of just some DR hiccup. She rarely uses any punctuations and never caps at the beginning of a sentence
 
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cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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My Domincan GF always says "aser" and I went nuts trying to figure what that word was.
She used it over and over again. Finally i figured she means hacer and I told her that but she still says aser

Is this common?
Also when she means to use the word nos she writes no... and that really messed me up
The 'h" is silent in the word "hacer". She's pronouncing it correctly.

The "s" is frequently dropped or ;pronounced very softly.
 
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