Electric Cars? Food for thought...

JD Jones

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Dr. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris, |Jan 15, 2022, |Climate Change, Feature1,Lifestyle,Politics

The utility companies have thus far had little to say about the alarming cost projections to operate electric vehicles (EVs) or the increased rates that they will be required to charge their customers. It is not just the total amount of electricity required, but the transmission lines and fast charging capacity that must be built at existing filling stations. Neither wind nor solar can support any of it. Electric vehicles will never become the mainstream of transportation!

In part 1 of our exposé on the problems with electric vehicles (EVs), we showed that they were too expensive, too unreliable, rely on materials mined in China and other unfriendly countries, and require more electricity than the nation can afford. In this second part, we address other factors that will make any sensible reader avoid EVs like the plague.

EV CHARGING INSANITY
In order to match the 2,000 cars that a typical filling station can service in a busy 12 hours, an EV charging station would require 600, 50-watt chargers at an estimated cost of $24 million and a supply of 30 megawatts of power from the grid. That is enough to power 20,000 homes. No one likely thinks about the fact that it can take 30 minutes to 8 hours to recharge a vehicle between empty or just topping off. What are the drivers doing during that time?
ICSC-Canada board member New Zealand-based consulting engineer Bryan Leyland describes why installing electric car charging stations in a city is impractical:
“If you’ve got cars coming into a petrol station, they would stay for an average of five minutes. If you’ve got cars coming into an electric charging station, they would be at least 30 minutes, possibly an hour, but let’s say its 30 minutes. So that’s six times the surface area to park the cars while they’re being charged. So, multiply every petrol station in a city by six. Where are you going to find the place to put them?” The government of the United Kingdom is already starting to plan for power shortages caused by the charging of thousands of EVs. Starting in June 2022, the government will restrict the time of day you can charge your EV battery. To do this, they will employ smart meters that are programmed to automatically switch off EV charging in peak times to avoid potential blackouts. In particular, the latest UK chargers will be pre-set to not function during 9-hours of peak loads, from 8 am to 11 am (3-hours), and 4 pm to 10 pm (6-hours). Unbelievably, the UK technology decides when and if an EV can be charged, and even allows EV batteries to be drained into the UK grid if required. Imagine charging your car all night only to discover in the morning that your battery is flat since the state took the power back. Better keep your gas-powered car as a reliable and immediately available backup! While EV charging will be an attractive source of revenue generation for the government, American citizens will be up in arms.

USED CAR MARKET
The average used EV will need a new battery before an owner can sell it, pricing them well above used internal combustion cars. The average age of an American made car on the road is 12 years. A 12-year-old EV will be on its third battery. A Tesla battery typically costs $10,000 so there will not be many 12-year-old EVs on the road. Good luck trying to sell your used green fairy tale electric car! Tuomas Katainen, an enterprising Finish Tesla owner, had an imaginative solution to the battery replacement problem—he blew up his car! New York City-based Insider magazine reported (December 27, 2021): “The shop told him the faulty battery needed to be replaced, at a cost of about $22,000. In addition to the hefty fee, the work would need to be authorized by Tesla…Rather than shell out half the cost of a new Tesla to fix an old one, Katainen decided to do something different… The demolition experts from the YouTube channel Pommijätkät (Bomb Dudes) strapped 66 pounds of high explosives to the car and surrounded the area with slow-motion cameras…the 14 hotdog-shaped charges erupt into a blinding ball of fire, sending a massive shockwave rippling out from the car…The videos of the explosion have a combined 5 million views.” We understand that the standard Tesla warranty does not cover “damage resulting from intentional actions,” like blowing the car up for a YouTube video.

EVS PER BLOCK IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded.

BATTERIES
Although the modern lithium-ion battery is four times better than the old lead-acid battery, gasoline holds 80 times the energy density. The great lithium battery in your cell phone weighs less than an ounce while the Tesla battery weighs 1,000 pounds. And what do we get for this huge cost and weight? We get a car that is far less convenient and less useful than cars powered by internal combustion engines. Bryan Leyland explained why: “When the Model T came out, it was a dramatic improvement on the horse and cart. The electric car is a step backward into the equivalence of an ordinary car with a tiny petrol tank that takes half an hour to fill. It offers nothing in the way of convenience or extra facilities.”

OUR CONCLUSION
The electric automobile will always be around in a niche market likely never exceeding 10% of the cars on the road. All automobile manufacturers are investing in their output and all will be disappointed in their sales. Perhaps they know this and will manufacture just what they know they can sell. This is certainly not what President Biden or California Governor Newsom are planning for. However, for as long as the present government is in power, they will be pushing the electric car as another means to run our lives. We have a chance to tell them exactly what we think of their expensive and dangerous plans when we go to the polls in November of 2022.

Drs. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris

Dr. Jay Lehr is a Senior Policy Analyst with the International Climate Science Coalition and former Science Director of The Heartland Institute. He is an internationally renowned scientist, author, and speaker who has testified before Congress on dozens of occasions on environmental issues and consulted with nearly every agency of the national government and many foreign countries. After graduating from Princeton University at the age of 20 with a degree in Geological Engineering, he received the nation’s first Ph.D. in Groundwater Hydrology from the University of Arizona. He later became executive director of the National Association of Groundwater Scientists and Engineers.

Tom Harris is Executive Director of the Ottawa, Canada-based International Climate Science Coalition, and a policy advisor to The Heartland Institute. He has 40 years of experience as a mechanical engineer/project manager, science and technology communications professional, technical trainer, and S&T advisor to a former Opposition Senior Environment Critic in Canada’s Parliament.
 

william webster

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Why is this in the Clown Bin ?

It's DR related - the Prez has one and they are selling... in a poorly electrified country
 
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bob saunders

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Other than all the other obvious reasons why most people can't afford an electric car the big thing I get out of the article is this:

" A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded."
So an huge upgrade to electrical distribution and capacity is required before mass marketing these vehicles, Hybrids seem to be a better idea.
 

chico bill

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The prices are too damn high
 

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JD Jones

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And then there's this:

Institute for Basic Science
Scientists in South Korea have proven that a new technology will cut the time it takes to charge electric cars to just nine seconds, allowing EV owners to ‘fill up’ faster than their gasoline counterparts.

And even those plugging-in at home will have the time slashed from 10 hours to three minutes.

The new device uses the laws of quantum physics to power all of a battery’s cells at once—instead of one at a time—so recharging takes no longer than filling up at the pump.

Electric cars were rarely seen on the roads 10 years ago, but millions are now being sold every year and it has become one of the fastest growing industries, but even the fastest superchargers need around 20 to 40 minutes to power their car.

Scientists at the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea have come up with a solution. Co-author Dr. Dario Rosa said the consequences could be far-reaching.

“Quantum charging could go well beyond electric cars and consumer electronics. For example, it may find key uses in future fusion power plants, which require large amounts of energy to be charged and discharged in an instant.”

The concept of a “quantum battery” was first proposed in a seminal paper published by Alicki and Fannes in 2012. It was theorized that quantum resources, such as entanglement, can be used to vastly speed up battery charging.

+The researchers used quantum mechanics to model their super fast charging station with calculations of the charging speed showing that a typical electric vehicle with a battery containing around 200 cells would recharge 200 times faster.

Current collective charging is not possible in classical batteries, where the cells are charged in parallel, independently of one another.

“This is particularly exciting as modern large-capacity batteries can contain numerous cells.”

The group went further to provide an explicit way of designing such batteries.

This means charging times could be cut from 10 hours to three minutes at home and from around 30 minutes to just a few seconds at stations.

Co-author Dr Dominik Šafránek said, “Of course, quantum technologies are still in their infancy and there is a long way to go before these methods can be implemented in practice.”

“Research findings such as these, however, create a promising direction and can incentivize the funding agencies and businesses to further invest in these technologies.

“If employed, it is believed that quantum batteries would completely revolutionize the way we use energy and take us a step closer to our sustainable future.”
 

chico bill

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Let's
Other than all the other obvious reasons why most people can't afford an electric car the big thing I get out of the article is this:

" A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded."
So an huge upgrade to electrical distribution and capacity is required before mass marketing these vehicles, Hybrids seem to be a better idea.
Let's admit the truth. The electrical system in the DR for sure, but certainly many other places, can not support electric cars en masse.
Heck many places in the US (California for one) are experiencing brown & blackouts for lack of electricity. And this year the water for hydro is extremely low
Yeah if you want to spend $65K plus another $15K for a home charging system to have a compact car that gives you 230 miles of range (when new) and maybe 8 years of driving then you can be an early adopter and get a free Social Justice Warrior Environmental pin to show all your friends at Bingo night.
It's fireproof and waterproof in case you have to sink.

Come on, You're Tryin' to Put Me On:

 
Jan 9, 2004
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Other than all the other obvious reasons why most people can't afford an electric car the big thing I get out of the article is this:

" A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded."
So an huge upgrade to electrical distribution and capacity is required before mass marketing these vehicles, Hybrids seem to be a better idea.
I am glad this is in the Clown Bin...........because whoever wrote the piece is clueless.

Tesla's or any EV for that matter does not require 75A service to charge at home.

75A does allow rapid charging and that system is usually installed by the vehicle owner at his/her own expense.......not the utility company. Ditto for the charging stations dotting the DR.

I am familiar with 20 Nissan Leafs currently being operated everyday up and down the east coast of the DR. They are charged as needed in the same location and CEPM has not been "wildly overloaded."

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

PJT

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The DR's electrical generation and distribution systems will not evolve enough to sustain an abundance of all electric vehicles.


Regards,

PJT
 

chico bill

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I am glad this is in the Clown Bin...........because whoever wrote the piece is clueless.

Tesla's or any EV for that matter does not require 75A service to charge at home.

75A does allow rapid charging and that system is usually installed by the vehicle owner at his/her own expense.......not the utility company. Ditto for the charging stations dotting the DR.

I am familiar with 20 Nissan Leafs currently being operated everyday up and down the east coast of the DR. They are charged as needed in the same location and CEPM has not been "wildly overloaded."

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
A Tesla at home rapid charger requires 80 AMPs at 240 volts, not 75.
The other slow & cheap one requires 20 AMPs and takes 4 days to fully charge a Tesla
 

NanSanPedro

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Let's

Let's admit the truth. The electrical system in the DR for sure, but certainly many other places, can not support electric cars en masse.
Heck many places in the US (California for one) are experiencing brown & blackouts for lack of electricity. And this year the water for hydro is extremely low
Yeah if you want to spend $65K plus another $15K for a home charging system to have a compact car that gives you 230 miles of range (when new) and maybe 8 years of driving then you can be an early adopter and get a free Social Justice Warrior Environmental pin to show all your friends at Bingo night.
It's fireproof and waterproof in case you have to sink.

Come on, You're Tryin' to Put Me On:


Never understood the infuatuation with electric cars. Probably never will.
 

jd426

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Battery warranties expire at 8 years for a reason,
If you can show me how I can save that $20,000 in 8 years on FUEL alone ,
then I will buy one .
The LOGIC most people cant grasp is that the Battery is EXACTLY like a Gas Tank on a REGULAR CAR ..
The FUEL is extra ... but even if it is FREE,
Would you buy any car where the Gas Tank costs $20,000 to replace in 8 - 10 years ?
think on that a moment No amount of Fancy Fuzzy math can dance around those Facts .
 
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bob saunders

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I am glad this is in the Clown Bin...........because whoever wrote the piece is clueless.

Tesla's or any EV for that matter does not require 75A service to charge at home.

75A does allow rapid charging and that system is usually installed by the vehicle owner at his/her own expense.......not the utility company. Ditto for the charging stations dotting the DR.

I am familiar with 20 Nissan Leafs currently being operated everyday up and down the east coast of the DR. They are charged as needed in the same location and CEPM has not been "wildly overloaded."

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
20 is nothing, what happens when there are 500,000...etc.
 

jd426

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20 is nothing, what happens when there are 500,000...etc.
I respectfully also strongly DISAGREE with Playacaribe on this one .
Ask anyone who works for a Utility company, or an Electrtical Engineer .
The Math just does not work .. the Grids can hardly handle AC units in the Hot Months and most Civilized Countries do Controlled Brown Outs or whatever they call them , to keep the Grid up and running ,
Add 500,000 Electric Cars = Disaster .. Hospitals will be FORCED to have Generators that can run 24/7
and those will be using DIESEL .
 
Jan 9, 2004
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20 is nothing, what happens when there are 500,000...etc.
Probably nothing.

There are currently almost 500,000 in the country of Norway alone;


Several million in China;


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

chico bill

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Well OK, but since the Tesla Level 2 charger can deliver up to 17.2 KW of power at the car battery, you would be under rated, since the amount of AMPs required for 17.2 @ 240 volts is 71.67 AMPs and depending on how far the run is from the power panel there will be some additional losses in the cable. So planning on 80 AMPs would be prudent to prevent breaker trips. And once a modern breaker begins to trip it gets weaker. An 80 AMP dual pole breaker costs from $40-$150 depending on the make of your main panel

At 50 AMPs a 240 circuit is rated to only deliver 12 KW
 
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