Exploitation of Dominican Teachers in NYC

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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$1350 for a shared hovel? Tell me more!😱
 

AlterEgo

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Jan 9, 2009
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South Coast
$1350 for a shared hovel? Tell me more!😱
I believe it. Rents in NYC are astronomical these days. Case in point. My grandmother rented an apartment in Brooklyn, what we called a “railroad apartment”. When she gave it up to move to Florida in 1990, she paid $110 a month. The landlord’s daughter moved in. That same apartment today rents for almost $4,000 a month. Gentrification. The Brooklyn brownstone my grandparents sold for $2,000 in 1950 just sold for over 2 million, in what was one of the worst, most dangerous sections of Brooklyn. Dominicans in Washington Heights and Inwood are finding themselves priced out of Manhattan, many moving to the Bronx.
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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I believe it. Rents in NYC are astronomical these days. Case in point. My grandmother rented an apartment in Brooklyn, what we called a “railroad apartment”. When she gave it up to move to Florida in 1990, she paid $110 a month. The landlord’s daughter moved in. That same apartment today rents for almost $4,000 a month. Gentrification. The Brooklyn brownstone my grandparents sold for $2,000 in 1950 just sold for over 2 million, in what was one of the worst, most dangerous sections of Brooklyn. Dominicans in Washington Heights and Inwood are finding themselves priced out of Manhattan, many moving to the Bronx.
Most Dominicans from Jarabacoa live on Long Island, or across the river in NJ.
 

bachata

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Aug 18, 2007
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I believe it. Rents in NYC are astronomical these days. Case in point. My grandmother rented an apartment in Brooklyn, what we called a “railroad apartment”. When she gave it up to move to Florida in 1990, she paid $110 a month. The landlord’s daughter moved in. That same apartment today rents for almost $4,000 a month. Gentrification. The Brooklyn brownstone my grandparents sold for $2,000 in 1950 just sold for over 2 million, in what was one of the worst, most dangerous sections of Brooklyn. Dominicans in Washington Heights and Inwood are finding themselves priced out of Manhattan, many moving to the Bronx.
The price of my house is way more than double today compared to what it was when we bought in 2016.

JJ
 

Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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The guy I know teaching in Santo Domingo told me there’s a program like this with Canada.
Maybe he meant this?
 

Tom F.

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Jan 1, 2002
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NYC teachers are well paid, does anyone know what these Dominican teachers are being paid?
The article states they were being paid as permanent substitutes which is a little less than US$200 a day. I assume they are given health benefits being they are full time. That is approximately $1000 a week or $52,000 a year. I think a first year teacher makes about the same, but you can apply for years of credit on the pay scale based on your previous experience, usually in teaching. I doubt they are allowed to apply this. When I taught in NYC approximately 1/3 of your pay is deducted for federal and state income tax, social security and medicare, and your union dues. That would mean these teachers make about $2640 take how a month. Half for rent I guess.

My sister in law used to be the president of this association of Dominican supervisors (superintendents, principals and assistant principals) in the NYC DOE. She is now the principal at St. Josephs in Santo Domingo for some years now. The association recently changed from not for profit to for profit is what she told me but is now way out of the loop even though she know most of the people involved.

The part that really bothered me is that the teachers were not allowed to bring their spouses and children with them. The article also noted one teacher wanted to live with a sibling in NYC and was forced to live in these units if he wanted to stay in the program.

Rooms in Washington Heights and the Bronx are usually $250-$300 a week so the living arrangements offered to the teachers are bit high than that. Right over the GWB in Cliffside Part you can rent a room for $700-800 a month and just take the bus into Manhattan.
 

keepcoming

Moderator - Living & General Stuff
May 25, 2011
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Just curious, are they being made to stay at these "rooming houses" because they are on a visa and the NYC DOE wants/needs to keep track of them so to speak? Not saying it is correct, just curious.
 

Tom F.

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Jan 1, 2002
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I would say not. If you stay beyond your work or travel visa, you pretty much go underground when it comes to employment and probably make half of what they are making now. The Central American day labors are now asking $200 a day, but there a lot of days they go home without work. There were only 25 teachers participating so the programs is very small.
 

KyleMackey

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Apr 20, 2015
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$1350 for a shared hovel? Tell me more!😱
That's just for a room. They are getting ripped off by the landlord Teacher. In 1 duplex this teacher owns there are 11 Dominicans paying 1,350-1400 a month. That's 15K a month for a duplex. NYC was putting homeless up in nice hotels for free but no program for the teachers?
 
Jan 9, 2004
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So as most know, the quality of public education in the DR is abysmal.......

So instead of incentivizing the best and brightest to stay home and educate, a scheme is concocted through the Dominican consulate to brain drain the country. Wondering out loud who is really benefiting by this.

Finally, out of the hundreds of thousands of Dominicans who are already living in New York, they are unable to find enough qualified bilingual educators among them?

Something just does not add up here.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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So as most know, the quality of public education in the DR is abysmal.......

So instead of incentivizing the best and brightest to stay home and educate, a scheme is concocted through the Dominican consulate to brain drain the country. Wondering out loud who is really benefiting by this.

Finally, out of the hundreds of thousands of Dominicans who are already living in New York, they are unable to find enough qualified bilingual educators among them?

Something just does not add up here.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
We have a student, born and raised in the Bronx to age nine, going to NYC schools from kindergarten to Grade four. He could speak English very well and somewhat functional in Spanish but couldn't read, never learned to write, only print. His math skills were age/grade appropriate but that was it. His mother, a former student of our asked if Yris would take him on. Within three months he was reading basic Spanish at Grade one level and by the end of the year he was up to Grade level. He is now doing Grade six and doing well. Hope he does well next year back in NYC. He said none of the teachers in NY spoke any language but English.
 

La Profe_1

Moderator: Daily Headline News, Travel & Tourism
Oct 15, 2003
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Bilingual education success depends heavily upon the student's motivation.

Before my retirement, I had a student from Taiwan assigned to my Regents level Biology class (NY state college-prep level coursework).

I don't speak Mandarin or Cantonese (student's two languages) and she didn't speak English.

However, that didn't stop her from putting forth the effort needed to succeed. At the end of the year, she took the standard Regents Examination in Biology, written in a language she did not speak nine months before, and passed it outright!

As much as I'd like to think it was my pedagogical expertise, I know that the credit for her accomplishment is hers and hers alone. She put in the time and effort to learn, and she did just that.
 

KyleMackey

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Apr 20, 2015
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We have a student, born and raised in the Bronx to age nine, going to NYC schools from kindergarten to Grade four. He could speak English very well and somewhat functional in Spanish but couldn't read, never learned to write, only print. His math skills were age/grade appropriate but that was it. His mother, a former student of our asked if Yris would take him on. Within three months he was reading basic Spanish at Grade one level and by the end of the year he was up to Grade level. He is now doing Grade six and doing well. Hope he does well next year back in NYC. He said none of the teachers in NY spoke any language but English.

That is stunning.