Expressions with Estar

Marianopolita

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Here is a nice video by the You Tuber from Andalucía that I discovered. Once again he does a great job explaining a grammar topic. This time it’s expressions with Estar. He explains the meaning of ten common expressions and gives examples. There are two that I learned from the video. I have never heard them at all in Latin America.

What expressions do you know and use with Estar? Add them in the thread below.




-MP.
 

drstock

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I'm not sure if it's completely relevant, but I have a couple of observations about "Estar".

First, it is used for location, as in "El bano esta en la derecha" (sorry about lack of accents). Seems strange to me because that bathroom isn't going to move!

Second, if I understand correctly, "Estar aburrido" means "to be bored" while "Ser aburrido" means "to be boring". Am I right here?
 
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Chirimoya

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I didn't know all of them either. Some are variations on expressions I'm familiar with. But others, like Estar mono/a are so very common in Spain but not at all here. It was one of the expressions I had to unlearn.

Estar de mala leche reminded me of a study I read by a mid-20th century anthropologist on the etymology of Andalusian slang and how so much is linked to male fertility.
 
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Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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I'm not sure if it's completely relevant, but I have a couple of observations about "Estar".

First, it is used for location, as in "El bano esta en la derecha" (sorry about lack of accents). Seems strange to me because that bathroom isn't going to move!

Second, if I understand correctly, "Estar aburrido" means "to be bored" while "Ser aburrido" means "to be boring". Am I right here?

What are you trying to say when you say el baño está en la derecha?’ Do you mean ‘a la derecha?’ as in on the right? Estar is used because of location. It refers to the location of the bathroom- a la derecha.

Estar aburrido- to be bored and Ser aburrido is to be a boring person- that is the meaning with Ser.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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I didn't know all of them either. Some are variations on expressions I'm familiar with. But others, like Estar mono/a are so very common in Spain but not at all here. It was one of the expressions I had to unlearn.

Estar de mala leche reminded me of a study I read by a mid-20th century anthropologist on the etymology of Andalusian slang and how so much is linked to male fertility.

Actually three were completely new to me. The rest I knew and even use. What I realize now is the ones I didn’t know are very colloquial meaning from Spain which explains why I was just listening and was totally stunned.

1) Estar mono- estar guapo (buena apariencia). I have never this and don’t anticipate hearing this in Latin America. I know one country for sure where this expression would not work.

2) Estar como un tren - similar to above but the meaning is I guess is more for women - una apariencia muy sexy 🤦‍♀️

3) Estar hasta el moño- I never heard that although it is quite understandable. The popular equivalent in my experience is Estar hasta la coronilla.


Yes, from my observation without reading anything is that slang from Spain is quite vulgar. I mean without wanting to you can say something vulgar and this is for people who just repeat when they learn a language. I tell people... por favor no hagas eso. No repitas todo lo que oigas.

En el quinto pino (very Spain) has a more colloquial vulgar equivalent which surprises me that people even speak like that which is En el quinto coño- really? I mean even when writing this who speaks like that? However, in the DR coño is thrown around all the time and pretty much my thoughts are the same. Often the more a word is used the meaning is no longer as strong but it depends on the speaker, education, social class etc. Whether one wants to admit it or not it always comes down to this type of analysis.
 
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Chirimoya

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1) Estar mono- estar guapo (buena apariencia). I have never this and don’t anticipate hearing this in Latin America. I know one country for sure where this expression would not work.
Mono/a can describe a person, an item of clothing, etc. ¡Qué mono/a! means something or someone is cute and you hear the expression a lot in Spain. Like ¡Qué lindo/a!

Yes, from my observation without reading anything is that slang from Spain is quite vulgar. I mean without wanting to you can say something vulgar and this is for people who just repeat when they learn a language. I tell people... por favor no hagas eso. No repitas todo lo que oigas.
You just have to watch TV shows or films from Spain to hear all the colourful expressions they use.
En el quinto pino (very Spain) has a more colloquial vulgar equivalent which surprises me that people even speak like that which is En el quinto coño- really? I mean even when writing this who speaks like that? However, in the DR coño is thrown around all the time and pretty much my thoughts are the same. Often the more a word is used the meaning is no longer as strong but it depends on the speaker, education, social class etc. Whether one wants to admit it or not it always comes down to this type of analysis.
There's also el quinto infierno.
 

Marianopolita

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Mono/a can describe a person, an item of clothing, etc. ¡Qué mono/a! means something or someone is cute and you hear the expression a lot in Spain. Like ¡Qué lindo/a!


You just have to watch TV shows or films from Spain to hear all the colourful expressions they use.

There's also el quinto infierno.

Expressions with mono are very colloquial. I will not use them if there is chance for misinterpretation.

I am aware of quite a few expressions from Spain. I have heard and learned a lot from literature but like I said some are really crazy. I would do well in Spain. Comprehension and speaking for sure.

El quinto infierno is a lot better than the vulgar alternative.
 

Marianopolita

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November 14, 2020 today’s challenge:


Write five sentences using Estar (without the use of a translator). Estar is one of the most common verbs in Spanish. This should be easy.

Who would like to go first?
 

drstock

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What are you trying to say when you say el baño está en la derecha?’ Do you mean ‘a la derecha?’ as in on the right? Estar is used because of location. It refers to the location of the bathroom- a la derecha.

Estar aburrido- to be bored and Ser aburrido is to be a boring person- that is the meaning with Ser.
Yes, sorry, I meant "a la derecha".
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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November 14, 2020 today’s challenge:


Write five sentences using Estar (without the use of a translator). Estar is one of the most common verbs in Spanish. This should be easy.

Who would like to go first?

Here are I mine:


1) Estaba cocinando. Ya terminé

2) La Covid-19 está causando problemas en todo el mundo. El número de casos nuevos va en aumento en muchos países.

3) La línea está ocupada todo el día. He tratado de llamar pero no logro comunicarme con el jefe de la compañía.

4) Está por verse si habrá una vacuna contra la COVID.

5) Se fue y estoy segura que no volverá. Qué triste.

6) ¿Cómo estás? Estoy muy bien. Gracias por preguntar 🙂


* I added a bonus phrase


-MP.