Fidel's demise and what it means to DR.

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Don Juan

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It means diplomatic"normalization".The lifting of the embargo, competition in manufactured goods, a preferred tourist destination, a bigger consumer of oil, (thereby hiking up prices), and a greater political influence in the Caribbean due to Chavez's sway. Etc..............All to the detriment of DR!!!.........Ay, coooo?ooo!!

If Raul changes his nation's political ideology to resemble that of China's, it's "curtains" for us, I tell you!.....We're freakin' doomed!

Please tell me it ain't so!:paranoid:
 

johne

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Jun 28, 2003
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It means diplomatic"normalization".The lifting of the embargo, competition in manufactured goods, a preferred tourist destination, a bigger consumer of oil, (thereby hiking up prices), and a greater political influence in the Caribbean due to Chavez's sway. Etc..............All to the detriment of DR!!!.........Ay, coooo?ooo!!

If Raul changes his nation's political ideology to resemble that of China's, it's "curtains" for us, I tell you!.....We're freakin' doomed!

Please tell me it ain't so!:paranoid:

What makes anyone think there will be any changes with the brother in command if Fidel should die?
 

zak023

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From the Cuban friends I have spoken too that have family in Cuba..Raul is not as firm as Fidel..Should Fidel expire I would not worry about the DR being DOOMED.....BTW ..What gave you the idea that things would turn for the worse.?
 

Mirador

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What makes anyone think there will be any changes with the brother in command if Fidel should die?


In yesterday's rally in Havana, marking the 50th aniversary of the Granma invasion (and Fidel's 80th birthday celebration), brother Raul used a word not in Fidel's vocabulary, 'negotiation', when he made a reference to resolve Cuba's historical dispute with the US.
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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He hasn't croaked yet, has he? Officially anyway. Funny how so many of these 'elder statesmen' die a long and drawn out death. Cf Franco, Shah of Iran, Arafat, Sharon...
 

cobraboy

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He hasn't croaked yet, has he? Officially anyway. Funny how so many of these 'elder statesmen' die a long and drawn out death. Cf Franco, Shah of Iran, Arafat, Sharon...
Franco's dead?

:surprised
 

Don Juan

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This is exactly what I mean.

In yesterday's rally in Havana, marking the 50th aniversary of the Granma invasion (and Fidel's 80th birthday celebration), brother Raul used a word not in Fidel's vocabulary, 'negotiation', when he made a reference to resolve Cuba's historical dispute with the US.

With Fidel gone, and the people's desire for change, who's gonna challenge Raul's decision to "negotiate" a better relationship with the US?
I think North America will want to deal with Raul and re-establish some kind of "softer" policy toward a more moderate leader and away from a former hard-liner.

IMHO, Raul can be persuaded to change his country's direction and persuasion toward more democratic principles pleasing to the rest of the world thereby opening up the door to investments, tourism, and beautiful Cuban chicks......All to the disadvantage of DR's monopoly on the Caribbean's tourism and babes.

We're gonna see less dollars and higher oil prices as a result!
 
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Viva Fidel. El Comandante is alive and kicking. He's staging his own long drawn out illness to weed out the enemies of the Revolution. Once he's finished with his work, you'll see him once again with his fiery speeches at La Plaza.
 

cobraboy

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With Fidel gone, and the people's desire for change, who's gonna challenge Raul's decision to "negotiate" a better relationship with the US?
I think North America will want to deal with Raul and re-establish some kind of "softer" policy toward a more moderate leader and away from a former hard-liner.

IMHO, Raul can be persuaded to change his country's direction and persuasion toward more democratic principles pleasing to the rest of the world thereby opening up the door to investments, tourism, and beautiful Cuban chicks......All to the disadvantage of DR's monopoly on the Caribbean's tourism and babes.

We're gonna see less dollars and higher oil prices as a result!
Might see real estate prices in the DR begin to moderate. The key would be private property ownership in Cuba (I have no idea about that, being a Communist government). There will be competing interests for investment capital.

I hope the Cuban government has a good court system. When the floodgates from the US open, there will be a million displaced Cubans in the US who want their "stuff" back that was confiscated.
 

Don Juan

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Nobody lives forever, pinko!

Viva Fidel. El Comandante is alive and kicking. He's staging his own long drawn out illness to weed out the enemies of the Revolution. Once he's finished with his work, you'll see him once again with his fiery speeches at La Plaza.

The man's sick with (reportedly) cancer of the stomach. No one's seen him in public lately, so you have to assume, given his zest for fiery rhetoric, that he can't even stand up much less give one of his trade-mark speeches.

Things will change there. How much is anybody's guess.
From a purely selfish stance, I should hope nothing does but that's highly unlikely.
Believe me, the US and Chavez will play tug-o-war with with Raul and DR will suffer economically as a result. A major influence war is about to begin with these two and we (DR) will have to choose sides to our loss... You'll see.:paranoid:
 

Andy B

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The topic of DR tourism after Cuba opens up has been discussed quite a bit on the forum. Basically, Cuban tourism open to Americans is the sleeping 800lb gorilla that's going to pounce on our rapidly-becoming-expensive DR tourism. Couple this with the Venezuela/Chavez factor as posted by Don Juan it will then be a lose-lose situation for the DR.
 

johne

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In yesterday's rally in Havana, marking the 50th aniversary of the Granma invasion (and Fidel's 80th birthday celebration), brother Raul used a word not in Fidel's vocabulary, 'negotiation', when he made a reference to resolve Cuba's historical dispute with the US.

will read the transcript later today when I have some time.
john
 

Danny W

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Mar 1, 2003
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No doubt DR tourism will suffer from more competition, but don't underestimate the turmoil of a regime change in Cuba. I would think twice before buying any property there. If you think clear title is an issure in the DR, wait till you see the confusion in Cuba.

Competiton might also force certain parties in the DR to get their act together. - D
 

gibbs

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May 31, 2005
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Raul, the great negotiator

"We are convinced that the way out of the burning conflicts faced by humanity does not lie in wars, but in political solutions. This is an opportunity to once again declare our disposition to resolve on the negotiating table the longstanding conflict between the United States and Cuba; of course, as long as they accept, as we have previously said, our condition of being a country that will not tolerate shadows over its independence, and based on the principles of equality, reciprocity, non-intervention and mutual respect."

Havana Club or Brugal?:bunny:
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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"We are convinced that the way out of the burning conflicts faced by humanity does not lie in wars, but in political solutions. This is an opportunity to once again declare our disposition to resolve on the negotiating table the longstanding conflict between the United States and Cuba; of course, as long as they accept, as we have previously said, our condition of being a country that will not tolerate shadows over its independence, and based on the principles of equality, reciprocity, non-intervention and mutual respect."

Havana Club or Brugal?:bunny:
Translation: Don't y'all come back here asking for all the stuff we took back..."

:cool:
 

Don Juan

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Dec 5, 2003
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Our, nation better prepare itself for the stiff competition for tourist dollars/euros it will get. This is a virtual certainty.
We need to get our act together by cleaning our streets and government of useless garbage.
We need to resolve the electricity and crime problems pronto before the, as AndyB quoted, 800lbs gorilla wakes up. If not, we'll have to head our yolas toward Cuba looking for jobs in the tourism industry.
 

zak023

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Feb 8, 2006
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Chevy Chase SNL

THis just in.... Generalissimo Francisco Franco is *still* dead...

The last time I heard that quote was more than 20 years ago by Chevy Chase on Saturday Nite Live NYC......

Good One !!!!!!
 

NALs

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Jan 20, 2003
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Will Dominican tourism feel the opening of Cuba to the US? Its going to feel something, I'm not too sure if it will be as the dooms day scenerio many are painting here.

Will it hurt the European component of Dominican tourism? No, Cuba is already one of the largest tourist destinations in the Caribbean with around 2 million tourists (almost all Europeans, although many Americans do visit despite the embargo). DR has not started to bleed because of that competition, despite the fact that many of the Spanish owned resorts that exist in the DR also have similar resorts in Cuba as well. Also, Cuba's tourism is on the all-inclusive model just like the DR's.

Will it hurt the American component of Dominican tourism? Don't know by how much, after all, Puerto Rico is an american territory. They can travel there without a passport, without changing currency, if they stick to San Juan's colonial core, Condado, and Isla Verde areas they don't even need to learn a few Spanish words!! Despite that, Dominican tourism has seen an upsurge in visits from Americans, that's taking into the account the necessity of having a passport, exchanging money, having to deal with customer service that is not always able to communicate in anything other than Spanish and/or a very sketchy English, etc. If DR managed to increase its American tourists without throwing Puerto Rico into a tailspin, well then what could be expected once Cuba opens up to the American market?

Besides, Dominica tourism is beginning to grow on the up market segment and while in Puerto Rico the same what ifs questions that have been presented on this thread are beginning to creep into the minds of Puerto Rican tourist officials, the truth of the matter is that competition from the DR will not cause PR's tourism to collapse.

In fact, competition never hurts. If anything, it makes the products better.

If that is not the case, can someone list just ONE tourist destination on this earth that has been doomed due to increased competition?

And no, tourist destinations that collapsed due to political instability, economic meltdowns, etc does not count.

List just ONE destination that has gone belly up due to competition alone.

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BTW, the Caribbean region receives every year around 20 to 30 million tourists.

The DR see's 3 to 4 million of them.

Since when does a 13% to 20% of the market share equals a monopoly????

Fidel will most likely be dead by this time next year, at least that's what I think. We should all be happy for the Cubans, its the best thing to ever happen to them since 1959!

-NALs
 
A

apostropheman

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Cuba is currently the #1 vacation destination for
Canadians...DR is #2 i believe...it's not just Europeans :)
 
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