Food For Thought Regarding Beach Openings

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Due to measures taken during this Covid19 frenzy (closures, quarantines, distancing), the balances of nature have been disrupted a wee bit. Not just in relation to how us as humans may or perhaps may not be coping with this situation at hand, but rather the effects it has had upon our environment.....and it's other inhabitants as well.

We have seen plenty of examples globally of various forms of land, air, and sea life venturing out of what we would like to view as "their areas", while they see this same exact process in a diametrically different light. Good bye humans, we want "our" space back.

With this in mind, would it not be fair to say that SHARKS could also play into this dynamic? With the RD experiencing record high temperatures in the last several weeks, and the regional Sea Surface Temperatures rising, along with the beach areas having been closed to most activities, what would prevent SHARKS from entering closer to our shore lines? Historically, not much to worry about regarding the Selachimorpha, but alas, these are not historically similar times. After all, they are well known to frequent the Mona Passage. A brief journey westward towards the Punta Cana/Bávaro region, or perhaps those lovely northern coastal "Everything _______" towns is not totally out of the question, or is it? I would not want to be that first person to go running full speed into the turquoise waters. You may come back with a lot less than just missing your speedo. Food for thought.
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
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Due to measures taken during this Covid19 frenzy (closures, quarantines, distancing), the balances of nature have been disrupted a wee bit. Not just in relation to how us as humans may or perhaps may not be coping with this situation at hand, but rather the effects it has had upon our environment.....and it's other inhabitants as well.

We have seen plenty of examples globally of various forms of land, air, and sea life venturing out of what we would like to view as "their areas", while they see this same exact process in a diametrically different light. Good bye humans, we want "our" space back.

With this in mind, would it not be fair to say that SHARKS could also play into this dynamic? With the RD experiencing record high temperatures in the last several weeks, and the regional Sea Surface Temperatures rising, along with the beach areas having been closed to most activities, what would prevent SHARKS from entering closer to our shore lines? Historically, not much to worry about regarding the Selachimorpha, but alas, these are not historically similar times. After all, they are well known to frequent the Mona Passage. A brief journey westward towards the Punta Cana/Bávaro region, or perhaps those lovely northern coastal "Everything _______" towns is not totally out of the question, or is it? I would not want to be that first person to go running full speed into the turquoise waters. You may come back with a lot less than just missing your speedo. Food for thought.

Food for thought? Or food for the sharks?
 
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Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
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Yes, exactly what everybody would like to see once restrictions are lifted, flights begin, hotels open, beach access.....SHARKS!
All in the name of restoring the balance of nature. Indeed.
 

habi

Active member
Oct 17, 2015
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Due to measures taken during this Covid19 frenzy (closures, quarantines, distancing), the balances of nature have been disrupted a wee bit. Not just in relation to how us as humans may or perhaps may not be coping with this situation at hand, but rather the effects it has had upon our environment.....and it's other inhabitants as well.

We have seen plenty of examples globally of various forms of land, air, and sea life venturing out of what we would like to view as "their areas", while they see this same exact process in a diametrically different light. Good bye humans, we want "our" space back.

With this in mind, would it not be fair to say that SHARKS could also play into this dynamic? With the RD experiencing record high temperatures in the last several weeks, and the regional Sea Surface Temperatures rising, along with the beach areas having been closed to most activities, what would prevent SHARKS from entering closer to our shore lines? Historically, not much to worry about regarding the Selachimorpha, but alas, these are not historically similar times. After all, they are well known to frequent the Mona Passage. A brief journey westward towards the Punta Cana/Bávaro region, or perhaps those lovely northern coastal "Everything _______" towns is not totally out of the question, or is it? I would not want to be that first person to go running full speed into the turquoise waters. You may come back with a lot less than just missing your speedo. Food for thought.

In theory maybe yes, but....
Sharks still need food! Be assured even if the genaral public is not allowed even to get close to the ocean the fishermen and pouchers are out on a dayly basis! So food was sparce before and now unfortunatly will be even less.
On the other hand, I would be the first to run in to the water if you can promiss that I will be able to see a shark (yes I would take a camera for prove! ):cool::love:🦈🦈
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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In theory maybe yes, but....
Sharks still need food! Be assured even if the genaral public is not allowed even to get close to the ocean the fishermen and pouchers are out on a dayly basis! So food was sparce before and now unfortunatly will be even less.
On the other hand, I would be the first to run in to the water if you can promiss that I will be able to see a shark (yes I would take a camera for prove! ):cool::love:🦈🦈

Will you be wearing a speedo? If so, I may be running in the other direction. 🏃‍♂️
 
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Billp16

Newbie
Jul 20, 2018
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Some of the best animals to dive with
 

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CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
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Here is a photo of the last shark that decided to
come in for a closer look at Playa Sosua.
Coyotes 1 - 0 Sharks
1588957407654.png
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Even the Photos are not from the last shark visiting playa Sosua it is still disturbing that the general public (yes also the "gringos") still think that only a dead shark is a good shark....😢😢😢😢

While I am not advocating eliminating sharks from our coastlines (if even possible), you must admit that they do have a rather unsettling appeal to beachgoers, and would not be a positive for businesses that will be trying to recuperate economically after this period of hardship (aka...The Cure).
 

habi

Active member
Oct 17, 2015
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While I am not advocating eliminating sharks from our coastlines (if even possible), you must admit that they do have a rather unsettling appeal to beachgoers, and would not be a positive for businesses that will be trying to recuperate economically after this period of hardship (aka...The Cure).

Sharks are a lot more valuble ($$$$) alive then dead just check out all the shark visiting money machines in Bahamas etc.!
 
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Ecoman1949

Born to Ride.
Oct 17, 2015
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Some people are under the misconception that Great Whites prefer warm waters. The truth is they range far and wide and are regularly sited in our cold but warming Atlantic waters along Canada’s east coast. We also have whale sharks, basking sharks, Atlantic blue sharks and even Makos in our cold waters. Significant changes in water temperature can actually alter the food chain and drive predator species away.
 
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