Getting a Dominican Passport

Barron

New member
Mar 17, 2010
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Tricky Question

I was born in the DR back in 1964 at Billini and we were there for less than a year then moved to the U.S. I currently live in Argentina and I am having a hell of a time trying to get my documentation for the DR. My Dad is Dominican and my mom American. I do not have a Cedula or a Dominican Certificate of birth. Yet I am interested in getting my Cedula and Passport. Am I just SOL or is there a way to get this done ??


Barron
 

dr pepper

New member
Feb 4, 2006
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Renewal of Dominican passports???

Are all these steps necessary to renew a Dominican passport that has not yet expired ????
 

PeteyPablo

Bronze
Apr 30, 2011
726
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I am starting the process for obtaining a passport here in the DR. (I'm a U.S. Citizen)

If anyone is interested, let me know, and I'll post a few updates on how it goes.
Yes very interested. If you like we can swap notes, I am starting the process too.

For starters, I called the DR Embassy in Miami, and they told me they no longer legalize birth certificates for US born nationals! They advised me I have to do that with my state of birth. When I advised a lawyer friend in DR, she states she checked with a government office in DR and that should not be correct and they should still legalize them. I am at a loss here. Only option I see is to do what the embassy says. Anyone wanna chime in on this?
 

Loopy

New member
Nov 16, 2011
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Up to date info

Does anyone know how much a passport is for a Dominican national now and what the process is?
 

Big_Poppi2

New member
Mar 30, 2008
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Aguilas Cibae?as
www.facebook.com
JDJones I want to really, really thank you for the post that you have made here and I want to tell you something of my own struggle with this passport situation of mine, and even worse now my kids. My Father is Dominicano, my mother black or as so many call them selves here in the United States African American. I was Born in Chicago, Ill. But My Mom and dad were not married and my biological father is not listed on my Birth certificate. I moved to Dominican Republic and lived there till I was 5. Not really legally I guess you could say, never being register or anything like that. I came back to the United States when my parents split. My mom, nor I have had much to any contact with my father since then and I couldn't tell you much about where he was born or any to most of my relatives and family in the DR, which now that I have two kids I have been trying desperately to reconnect with for so, so many reasons. I too would like to have citizenship in the DR and have that also for my kids. My wife is from the Philippines and when she was starting the process of getting our kids filipino passports, it made me want and think of the Dominican passports also. I figure we are just SOL but even if they can't vote or any of that, my kids deserve to have a connection with their true heritage and try to reconnect with our family there? What should I do, is there any hope, I refuse to give up because it seems that I lost my way, and I won't let them lose theirs and not have the pride they should rightfully have. They deserve that at least. Any help, advice, and consideration would be a blessing, also I know my family is from Puerta Plata, if that helps any? God bless and thanks in advance
Biggs
 

PeteyPablo

Bronze
Apr 30, 2011
726
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I have a friend that works in the immigration office, so I'm doing things step by step, as she is calling them.
Are you referring to the immigration office in the DR or stateside? Either way, that is a good friend to have :D

The first is to get an Apostille for my birth certificate, which is required by immigration. According to her, it has to come from your state of birth.

After googling Apostille, and finding all kinds of folks that are willing to do it for hundreds of dollars, I googled once again, but with the name of my state included in the search.

I got the Secretary of States website, and gave them a call.

The nice lady told me to send a check for 5 dollars, a copy of my birth certificate, a SSAE, and a cover letter stating what the Apostille is needed for, and she'd fire one back for me.

Off went the letter, and I'm waiting for it's return.

Here is my update...I'm done!!! I am now officially a naturalized Dominican citizen! The OP (Mr. Lu) was right, the process is not bad at all if you are the child of a Dominican.

The biggest pain in the ass was getting 'vault' copies of my birth certificate, and getting them Apostilled. I could have done what you did JD, but I opted for the express service...I had mine back in 2 days flat!

Once my application was approved I went to the Dominican consulate in Miami and picked up my birth certificate. While I was there I applied for my cedula. All that was involved for that was taking my pic (freakin mugshot lol), fingerprints, and paying $15. Man, the lady that works that post in the consulate is a character, let me tell you! She wouldn't stop taking cheap shots at me lol.

Now I just wait for the cedula app to be processed, which they advised me could take up to 2 months, then I can go back and pick it up (and get heckled again :eek::eek:)

...then PASSPORT!
 

PeteyPablo

Bronze
Apr 30, 2011
726
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If you are the child of a Dominican national, and have a cedula, this is the final step in the "legalization" process. If you can get it, and it's cheap , why not? There are benefits to having dual citizenship, and for those who inherit it, it is worth getting, especially at a cost of a few hundred dollars, for the complete process.

For non-Dominicans, the benefits might be minimal. I will say that having a DR passport allows you to travel to certain places with no visas, or cheaper visas. For example, it is easier getting in and out of Cuba, and a visitors visa to Brazil is much cheaper for a Dominican, than it is for an American. There are other examples of this with other countries. I also like the idea of not having to carry around a US passport everywhere. I'd much rather lose my Dominican passport, than my American passport any day.

Is a US/UK passport beneficial? Yes. If you have one, great, but a second passport could do no harm.

Mr. Lu

Mr. Lu is right for all the reasons he mentioned above. But there are also some hidden benefits as well. Being a multinational is of the greatest importance considering the global economic situation.

For instance, operating a company in a country that has favorable tax rates is extra money in your pocket. As the saying goes 'money saved is money earned'. Expats (or those contemplating it) would be doing themselves a favor by educating themselves on this subject, and much much more.

Here is some food for thought: Sovereign Man
 

arrugala

Bronze
Nov 7, 2010
967
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One obvious one is that if there was a lost ,stolen ,or they had a problem with their primary passport,travelling they would not be held up losing hundreds of dollars in lost travel tickets ,had they planned a trip and found out that their passport was less than 6 months to renewal or some other impairment
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
33,404
1,420
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One obvious one is that if there was a lost ,stolen ,or they had a problem with their primary passport,travelling they would not be held up losing hundreds of dollars in lost travel tickets ,had they planned a trip and found out that their passport was less than 6 months to renewal or some other impairment
It would not help a US Citizen travelling to the US since a US Citizen must travel to the US on a US passport. Also keep in mind how many countries a Dominican can legally enter without getting a visa.
 

sunburnt

New member
Aug 14, 2013
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Here is my situation. My husband's passport and acta de nacimiento say he was born in one city (Padre las Casas), but his cedula and our acta de matrimonio state another city(La Laguna, where he was actually born). What should he do? Will he need to fix his acta de nacimiento and then his passport? Or because La Laguna is in Padre las Casas it could be fine as is.
 

Tungsten

New member
Sep 5, 2013
26
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www.abreuimmigration.com
Yes very interested. If you like we can swap notes, I am starting the process too.

For starters, I called the DR Embassy in Miami, and they told me they no longer legalize birth certificates for US born nationals! They advised me I have to do that with my state of birth. When I advised a lawyer friend in DR, she states she checked with a government office in DR and that should not be correct and they should still legalize them. I am at a loss here. Only option I see is to do what the embassy says. Anyone wanna chime in on this?
You can legalize your document by sending it to the Secretary of State. If your birth certificate is from Florida, you can follow the instructions of the following site Florida Division of Corporations - Notary Commissions and Apostille/Certification Sections Make sure that you send the request by express courier, such as UPS Express, FedEx or DHL. Include a pre-paid airbill which includes your address here and in approximately two to three weeks you will receive your birth certificate apostilled. There is also an agency that will apsotille your document within 24 hours apostille.net - Home All you need to do is send a scanned copy of the document and they will certify a copy, apostille and send via express courier to your address in DR. They charge US$200.00, it's a bit pricey but if you need a document on an urgent basis it's an option.