Goya to distribute Café Santo Domingo in New York area

Dolores

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Goya Foods has agreed to distribute Industrias Banilejas (Induban) products in northeastern United States. Induban is the producer of Café Santo Domingo. Café Santo Domingo will now be available at thousands of points of sale such as independent supermarkets, regional supermarket chains and national chains.

Joseph Pérez, vice-president of Goya Foods and Manuel Pozo Perelló, president of Induban signed for the companies.

Pozo Perello explained that the effort is part of an aggressive expansion strategy in the northeastern USA that includes direct sales through Amazon, too.

Present at the signing of the agreement were Eddie Pacheco, sales execution manager of Goya Foods, and Nelson de los Santos, international market sales manager of Induban.

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Mcinbrass

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Dominican coffee is inferior to even Brazilian. I drink it when Im in DR but I would never buy it otherwise.
 

NanSanPedro

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Dominican coffee is inferior to even Brazilian. I drink it when Im in DR but I would never buy it otherwise.

I prefer Kenyan myself but I think this is to market to the Dominicans in NY. It makes good sense and could grow.
 

AlterEgo

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I prefer Kenyan myself but I think this is to market to the Dominicans in NY. It makes good sense and could grow.
Exactly. It’s what they’re accustomed to, and it’s hard to find in most places. It’ll do well. I wonder if they’ll carry beans too, or only molido. Our personal preference is Starbucks dark espresso beans.
 
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bob saunders

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I will drink almost anything over Starbucks, even McDonalds coffee beat that. My MIL mixes Santo Domingo with a local coffee , Son Antonio, and the blend is pretty good.
 
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PCMike

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Seeing that Santo Domingo coffee is now almost 50% foreign coffee, it is hard to deem it " Dominican". But it keeps the prices down. I have noticed it is not as hearty as it used to be.
 

reilleyp

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For those complaining about the Santo Domingo coffee try buying the whole bean and grinding it. It is much better. That seems to be the case with pretty much all coffee anymore. I think they are sweeping the dirt off the floor and adding it into the coffee if you buy the ground coffee.
 

AlterEgo

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For those complaining about the Santo Domingo coffee try buying the whole bean and grinding it. It is much better. That seems to be the case with pretty much all coffee anymore. I think they are sweeping the dirt off the floor and adding it into the coffee if you buy the ground coffee.
Our maid swears they grind guandules in there too 🤣
 
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NALs

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Goya is a good company
It's the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the USA founded by Spanish immigrants. All their factories are in the USA, DR (San Cristóbal), PR, and Spain. They are headquartered in Jersey City, New Jersey.


Goya DR (Spanish)
 
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reilleyp

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Global data about coffee adulteration are practically nonex-
istent, mainly because it involves the domestic economic situa-
tion of each country. In Brazil, which is the world’s largest
coffee producer, an inspection conducted by ABIC analyzed
2400 brands, and among these 583 were adulterated with husks,
maize, rye, a¸ca

ıseeds, or brown sugar, representing 25% of the
national brands (Peixoto, 2009). Most of these brands were not
certified by ABIC. However, this problem is even greater in
some Brazilian states, as in the state of Minas Gerais, which
owns 50% of the Brazilian coffee production. In this state, the
adulterations reach 47% of regional brands (Peixoto, 2009)

Looks like the maid could be correct. Go with the whole bean.
 
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