Great News For Foreigners Looking To Get Their "Cedula" Under New Process!

Criss Colon

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Jan 2, 2002
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yahoomail.com
According to "Diario Libre" today, over 31,000 foreigners have gone in for the process, so far . "Less Than 100" have been able to complete the "Paper work"!
I'm getting in line "Manana"!
Why are we NOT SURPRISED??????????
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Contango

Banned
Dec 27, 2010
2,196
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According to "Diario Libre" today, over 31,000 foreigners have gone in for the process, so far . "Less Than 100" have been able to complete the "Paper work"!
I'm getting in line "Manana"!
Why are we NOT SURPRISED??????????
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Legally they will be able to deport these folks on "Checkmate" day...
 

zoomzx11

Gold
Jan 21, 2006
7,467
139
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What's the problem? Never mind. I should know better by now than to ask a questionlike that.
 

Chirimoya

Moderator - East Coast & Headline News
Dec 9, 2002
17,723
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Today's DR1 News summary has more details

Only 100 people qualified so far
Minister of Interior and Police Jose Ramon Fadul has reiterated his call to the Haitian authorities to provide greater support to the process of issuing legal documentation to their nationals. He says that since the start of the foreigner nationalization plan, 31,000 foreigners have applied, of whom 97% are Haitian. Only 100 of the applicants have the required documentation, which is a birth certificate or passport from their country of origin. Fadul said that 5,900 applicants had submitted some of the documents they need in order to regularize their status but most have none at all.
Since the plan started on 2 June 2014, the main complaint from Haitian immigrants has been that the Haitian Embassy in the Dominican Republic is charging between US$50 to issue birth certificates and US$80 for passports, which they cannot afford.
Fadul added that Haiti should provide more help to their nationals. Nevertheless, he said the Dominican government could not interfere in internal Haitian politics. "Most of the Haitians who want to regularize their status have no documentation and the Dominican state cannot give them this - only Haiti can," he stated.
He emphasized that the Haitian government should make a stronger effort to help its people, saying that the Dominican government was offering the regularization service free of charge. All the Haitians need is to present their documents from their country of origin. Haitians living in the Dominican Republic have urged the Haitian government to issue Haitian passports in the Dominican Republic, as is done in the Haitian mission in Washington, D.C. The Dominican Republic is the foreign nation where most Haitians live. At present, Haitians who request their passports here need to wait around three months to receive the document.
The application process ends on 15 May 2015. Fadul warned that they would not change the timeframe established for completing the regularization process and once it was over the migration policy would enter a new phase when every foreigner in the country must have the correct documents or face deportation.
Solo 100 de 31 mil completan requisitos de regularizaci?n - listindiario.com
El Caribe ? Gobierno no variar? requisitos del Plan
El Caribe ? Paraison pide a Hait? oficina de pasaportes en RD
 

MpJuly

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Apr 30, 2009
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If you cannot afford US$50 to have a birth certificate and US$80 a passport are you able to live here in DR ? Are you able to meet others requirement of the plan ?

Perhaps that we don't pay in our country for a birth certificate... but we pay for passport, and sometime the passport here are more expensive that in our origin country, is the case for Canada etc...

this is an opinion not need to debate it
 

La Profe_1

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Oct 15, 2003
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I read the article in Spanish, and I THINK that in Spanish they said that it was Haitians who were lacking documentation.

From Listin Diario:

Jos? Ram?n Fadul, llam? ayer a las autoridades haitianas a ofrecer una mayor colaboraci?n a sus nacionales, debido a que de 31,000 extranjeros que han ido a regularizarse, 97% corresponde a nacionales de ese pa?s, de los cuales solo 100 han presentado toda la documentaci?n requerida.
Solo 100 de 31 mil completan requisitos de regularizaci?n - listindiario.com
 

Hernandez

Banned
Feb 9, 2009
875
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If you cannot afford US$50 to have a birth certificate and US$80 a passport are you able to live here in DR ?
Stray dogs and cats can't pay for a birth certificate and a passport, but they still live in the streets of DR. Haitians live the same way. And many Dominicans too.
 

Dan Spinnover

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Nov 1, 2010
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I'm surprised that noone, nowhere that I read on DR1 has mentioned the BIG implications of declaring that you are a resident of a different country on your US tax return?!?!!!!

I'm not a legal expert, but from what I understand, once you are a resident, it's possible that you have to pay yearly Dominican taxes, and the US tax payment required gets real complicated. Could have problems with getting US health coverage, life insurance... etc.

Would love to be wrong about this, if that helps, or matters...
 

Criss Colon

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Jan 2, 2002
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I see no need to tell the US Gov. that you have residency here.
There are tax laws, for those who wish to follow them, Soooooooooooooooooo do what you feel is right.
Many THOUSANDS of Americans, & other nationalities have dual citizenship with the DR with no problems.
My 3 kids carry both passports.
Stop Worrying!
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Dan Spinnover

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Nov 1, 2010
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Sorry to say, the way things are going.... they will probably find out eventually if you're living in a non-US country. In fact, that could be the reason that the DR is now clamping down on everybody... to help the US Gov'mnt out (as well as deposing undocumented Haitians).

As you know, dual citizenship is different than dual residencies.

For example, I have dual citizenship with the US and Canada...but it's not a problem because Canada doesn't afflict me with any of their tax, or other laws, because I don't live there.
 

jimmythegreek

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Dec 4, 2008
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Sorry to say, the way things are going.... they will probably find out eventually if you're living in a non-US country. In fact, that could be the reason that the DR is now clamping down on everybody... to help the US Gov'mnt out (as well as deposing undocumented Haitians).

As you know, dual citizenship is different than dual residencies.

For example, I have dual citizenship with the US and Canada...but it's not a problem because Canada doesn't afflict me with any of their tax, or other laws, because I don't live there.
There is almost no incentive for a U.S. Citizen to obtain Dominican Citizenship because the United States is one of the only countries in the world, other than Eritrea, that taxes based on Citizenship vs. Residency. So no matter where you go, all of the U.S. income tax law is going to apply to you. Yes, there is a earned income tax credit-which may or may not continue, but for those with passive income, it means little to have the other citizenship now unless you revoke your U.S. Citizenship.
 

bronzeallspice

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Mar 26, 2012
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Sorry to say, the way things are going.... they will probably find out eventually if you're living in a non-US country. In fact, that could be the reason that the DR is now clamping down on everybody... to help the US Gov'mnt out (as well as deposing undocumented Haitians).

As you know, dual citizenship is different than dual residencies.

For example, I have dual citizenship with the US and Canada...but it's not a problem because Canada doesn't afflict me with any of their tax, or other laws, because I don't live there.
The DR and other countries MUST disclose to the US those who have residency.

Correction: The DR is not helping out the US. The US is forcing the DR through the regularization plan.
 

Dan Spinnover

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Nov 1, 2010
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possible DR taxes imposed on residents

"There is almost no incentive for a U.S. Citizen to obtain Dominican Citizenship"

It's even worse than that... I'm not a lawyer or in any way familiar with the tax laws of the D.R... but I would suppose that people who obtain Dominican Citizenship, or even official resident status may be subject to yearly Dominican tax filings as well. Maybe it all will mean very little. Maybe not??

Following is an excerpt found in a thread in the Legal section in DR1: http://dr1.com/forums/legal/73442-overview-dominican-tax-law.html

------------------------------------------------------------
LTSteve

Join Date:Jul 2010
Posts:2,514

Quote Originally Posted by Robert

Recent article by Fabio Guzman for Tax Notes Int’l.

PDF document: http://dr1.com/legal/FGuzmanTaxNotesFeb2008.pdf


Guzman Ariza & Asociados - The Dominican Republic Law Firm: Guzman Ariza, Attorneys at Law.

This is great info for ex-pats who may be doing business in the DR. The difference between the DR and the US is that currently the DR does not have the computer abilitity to track those who don't pay and should but they are implenting a new system which will close many loopholes.

LTSteve


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01-01-2014, 09:39 AM
#12


MikeFisher
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Join Date:Feb 2006
Posts:7,759


and take care that you visit up to date links/info, as this Topic here is a few years old, and such laws do change once in a while.

Happy New Year

Mike
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Last edited:

Dan Spinnover

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Nov 1, 2010
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source document: http://dr1.com/legal/FGuzmanTaxNotesFeb2008.pdf

From cited .pdf document by Fabio Guzman, page 433 (1st page of document):
Dominican income tax law is primarily territorial.
All income derived from work or business activities in
the Dominican Republic is taxable, no matter if the
person is a Dominican, a resident foreigner, or a nonresident
foreigner (articles 269 and 270).

Income derived from work done outside of the Dominican
Republic, by Dominicans or resident foreigners,
is not taxable in the Dominican Republic. The exception
to the principle of territoriality is income from
financial sources abroad (articles 269 and 271). A Dominican
or a resident foreigner receiving income from
financial investments (for example, stocks and bonds or
certificates of deposits) must pay taxes in the Dominican
Republic on their income from those investments
(article 269). Pensions and Social Security benefits are
exempt (article 2 of Regulation 139-98). For the resident
foreigner, this obligation starts three years after
obtaining residency (article 271).
 
Last edited:

jimmythegreek

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Dec 4, 2008
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The DR and other countries MUST disclose to the US those who have residency.

Correction: The DR is not helping out the US. The US is forcing the DR through the regularization plan.
I have to agree on this point. After seeing what is going on here with the regularization plan over the last few weeks and in combination with the pre-paid phone chips story, 911 system, new cedula id's for everyone plus reforma fiscal from 2012-It certainly appears to be originating from western countries-more than likely primarily the U.S.-The regularization plan appears to be more about identifying U.S. Citizens and Residents in the D.R. verses Haitians. The idea that the plan is for Haitians appears to be nothing more than a cover story and with so few Haitians being able to qualify for the amnesty program, it certainly appears that it was not intended for them. As the U.S. is looking for revenue anywhere and everywhere through various means (FATCA, etc.), this story certainly puts the pieces of the puzzle together. Who financed the 911 system for DR? Who paid for the regularization plan? Ok then. Also, realize that probably the U.S. wants to identify those citizens and residents there in DR because they may have families and that just juices the penalties even further for this ACA requirement in the tax returns starting in 2014. Etc Etc. the story goes on and on.
 

jimmythegreek

Bronze
Dec 4, 2008
1,066
4
0
"There is almost no incentive for a U.S. Citizen to obtain Dominican Citizenship"

It's even worse than that... I'm not a lawyer or in any way familiar with the tax laws of the D.R... but I would suppose that people who obtain Dominican Citizenship, or even official resident status may be subject to yearly Dominican tax filings as well. Maybe it all will mean very little. Maybe not??

Following is an excerpt found in a thread in the Legal section in DR1: http://dr1.com/forums/legal/73442-overview-dominican-tax-law.html

------------------------------------------------------------
LTSteve

Join Date:Jul 2010
Posts:2,514

Quote Originally Posted by Robert

Recent article by Fabio Guzman for Tax Notes Int’l.

PDF document: http://dr1.com/legal/FGuzmanTaxNotesFeb2008.pdf


Guzman Ariza & Asociados - The Dominican Republic Law Firm: Guzman Ariza, Attorneys at Law.

This is great info for ex-pats who may be doing business in the DR. The difference between the DR and the US is that currently the DR does not have the computer abilitity to track those who don't pay and should but they are implenting a new system which will close many loopholes.

LTSteve


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01-01-2014, 09:39 AM
#12


MikeFisher
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Join Date:Feb 2006
Posts:7,759


and take care that you visit up to date links/info, as this Topic here is a few years old, and such laws do change once in a while.

Happy New Year

Mike
----------------------------------------

That would be the case if you reside over 183 days per year IN the Dominican Republic. DR has a residency based taxation system. The United States is one of only two countries with a citizenship based taxation system. The other country is Eritrea in Africa.