Haiti is a failed state in irreversible decline

windeguy

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I have been saying this since for years:

Haiti is a failed state in irreversible decline​



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windeguy

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Santo Domingo, DR

The deep crisis that is hitting Haiti has led to the insecurity that diplomatic and consular officials have been forced to take precautionary measures to avoid being victims of kidnapping, a criminal modality in vogue as a reflection of the fact that the authorities do not guarantee the functioning of any of the essential services.

The insecurity that the neighboring country is experiencing has become complicated since the absence of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (Minustah), a situation that has become untenable in the last two months, which has led most diplomatic missions to take shelter and have the fewest personnel in the embassies and consulates.

As Haiti’s elected authorities have lost their monopoly on force, a power vacuum has been created that organized crime is trying to fill, affecting even the banking institutions.

Banks operating in Port-au-Prince and other major cities were forced to prohibit their employees from having their cell phones with them while they are at work. Many people have been kidnapped or assaulted when leaving banking establishments.

The insecurity of banking operations and their clients have moved to other complicity levels because, despite the measures taken by their executives, clients’ ambushes continue, which for many means that criminal networks reach different levels of hierarchy.

The increase in Haiti’s kidnappings was reported by the Spanish news agency EFE, which highlighted the authorities’ powerlessness to confront this phenomenon, “limiting themselves to advising the population to avoid being kidnapped.

“For at least a month, images of kidnapped persons have been circulating daily on social networks; among them, one of the most stupefying cases is that of a girl who disappeared more than a week ago and whose video in a school uniform is constantly circulating on social networks,” reports EFE.

A dangerous situation

Conversations with people living in Port-au-Prince and the surrounding areas revealed that the situation is perceived as very dangerous because low-income families have to send their children to schools or colleges at the mercy of prayers alone.

Middle-class sectors with economic power decided to move to the Dominican Republic by renting houses and enrolling their children in Dominican schools.

In the last seven days, 14 kidnappings were registered in the Haitian capital, including foreigners. However, the number of people kidnapped cannot be specified because, in that country, no law enforcement institution has this information systematized.

Since December, the criminal gangs were activated in exceptional circumstances when its members go out to “fish,” which is not difficult in a country where the public forces are weak. Its members already have a record of carrying out a protest, which leaves much desired.

Instead of announcing measures to contain the criminal wave, the Prime Minister of Haiti, Joseph Jouthe, after urging the population to be careful and vigilant, issued a decree creating the National Intelligence Agency (ANI), which is interpreted by diplomatic sectors as a desperate measure to reverse the chaos.

Not for a few experts and career diplomats who are familiar with the Haitian situation, creating the National Intelligence Agency is an unfortunate surprise because it was understood that this body for compiling, systematizing information, and monitoring organized crime already existed.

The timid measure is seen with anger not only by diplomats but by the majority of the population who accuse the government of being focused on the organization of the next elections that should be held on a date that the president himself has not yet defined. Since January, the Haitian president has been governing by decree when the legislators’ term ended, and the legislative elections were postponed. His period ends in February 2022.

Promises of elections

Large mass mobilizations preceded the worsening of the climate of insecurity that is being experienced at this time in Haiti in protest against the government of President Jovenel Moise, who, despite these facts, has remained unscathed, promising legislative and presidential elections without specifying when.

The widespread discontent expressed in the streets with the burning of private properties in Port-au-Prince and other cities has left. As a result, half a hundred people dead, to which has been added a peculiar protest in recent months by the Police itself, an institution called upon to preserve public order.

In addition to the kidnappings in Haiti, there have been selective murders of personalities, as occurred last August 28 when unknown persons ambushed the president of the Bar Association, Me Monferrier Dorval, a crime that dismayed the nation since he was one of the voices that advocated a new Constitution.

The Haitian police were unable to contain organized crime and common delinquency since an operation called Terminator 1 was ineffective in stopping the armed gangs’ actions, which operate in the most popular neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, whose streets, businesses, and restaurants at night look deserted.

“At night, no diplomat or foreigner living in this city has to go out to look for anything, except to be murdered or kidnapped,” commented a source linked to the Haitian parliament.

Road trips from Santo Domingo to Port-au-Prince or any other Haitian city to that capital have been reduced because it is now a habit for carjackers to assault.

Failed State Sequel

Although most of the diplomatic corps based in Haiti have been cautious in calling the situation a collapse of the state, opinions are no longer reserved for the pillow or the official confidential reports of ambassadors and consuls.

A failed state is one that is unable to guarantee its functioning, such as the essential services it must provide to the population.

It is an expression, Failed State, that appeared in the political and diplomatic language in the last decades from the convulsions in Somalia, Libya, Sudan, Yemen, Congo, Ethiopia, Iraq, and Zimbabwe, where the authorities lose the monopoly of the force, legitimacy, and disputes between institutions are registered, as it happens for years in the neighboring country whose Constitution establishes two powers: the president and the prime minister.

The deep institutional crisis began to worsen since the United Nations’ stabilization forces decided to eliminate one of the few institutions operating: the Armed Forces.

“The dog died…”

Pushed by the violence and abuses generated by the Armed Forces and the so-called Ton Macoute, the international community applied the saying that “once the dog is dead, the rage is over” by passing the buck to the Haitian Army, Navy, and police.

Despite the remaining 13 years on Haitian soil, the United Nations’ military force only served to consume 7.33 billion dollars in that time, which were taken advantage of by contractors and suppliers, often with powerful sponsors.

The truth is that after their withdrawal from Haiti, the Blue Helmets did not fulfill any mission that has left a legacy in that island territory, except for the children of soldiers who procreated with Haitian women called “little Minustah,” who are abandoned babies, and that some of the countries from which those soldiers came, assumed paternal responsibilities.

This new theater in that failed state does not cease to represent a threat to its closest neighbor, where its president Luis Abinader has said that the Dominican Republic cannot bear that problem.
 
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NY2STI

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My first thought - maybe yours as well - is that Haiti needs to be run by a billionaire businessman who will not be seduced by the relatively paltry millions to be made by corruption and who, as a matter of principle, takes exception to the word "irreversible". I did some research and found this guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbe...gio is a Haitian,an honorary consul to Israel.

Anyone know him? I wonder if Abinader knows people who would be interested in trying their luck.
 

NanSanPedro

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My first thought - maybe yours as well - is that Haiti needs to be run by a billionaire businessman who will not be seduced by the relatively paltry millions to be made by corruption and who, as a matter of principle, takes exception to the word "irreversible". I did some research and found this guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Bigio#:~:text=Gilbert Bigio is a Haitian,an honorary consul to Israel.

Anyone know him? I wonder if Abinader knows people who would be interested in trying their luck.

He's 85. Wonder about his son, assuming he has one.
 

carlos

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Enough with the US political banter or you will find yourself on a vacation from this site.

stay on topic
 

Russell

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My heart goes out to the poor and children . but after seeing that none of the billions of dollars sent there 10 years ago, I cannot send my money out to them anymore...So very sad.
 
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NanSanPedro

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My heart goes out to the poor and children . but after seeing that none of the billions of dollars sent there 10 years ago, I cannot send my money out to them anymore...So very sad.

I take exception to that. The money not donated to the Red Cross was well spent. I was in charge of a minute amount to help refugees. It went to the right people. The churches did what they could. The Red Cross did f-up royally, but that's on them, not the non-crooked Haitians.

But until they get a real leader, things will remain the same in the macro sense. In the micro sense, we can and I will help where I can. I even have it in a trust that it will continue after I'm dead. I won't abandon them.
 
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aarhus

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My heart goes out to the poor and children . but after seeing that none of the billions of dollars sent there 10 years ago, I cannot send my money out to them anymore...So very sad.
I also suddenly was very charitable after the earthquake. I won’t do it again. Certainly never again money. It doesn’t go to the right people. Yes very sad.
 

aarhus

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So again question to the moderators. What’s the purpose of the Haiti forum. 1. To trash talk Haiti. I would say this thread with thread title goes under that catagory including Cristoreys comment about the Haitian people. 2. Is it about what goes on in Haiti like events and how to get there and hotels etc for tourists ? or is it 3. anything relevant for the DR and DR-Haiti relations ?
 
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AlterEgo

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So again question to the moderators. What’s the purpose of the Haiti forum. 1. To trash talk Haiti. I would say this thread with thread title goes under that catagory including Cristoreys comment about the Haitian people. 2. Is it about what goes on in Haiti like events and how to get there and hotels etc for tourists ? or is it 3. anything relevant for the DR and DR-Haiti relations ?

I’ve been the moderator for this forum since its inception. It was created after the earthquake 10 years ago, to segregate discussions about Haiti, but not ignore them. It was a traumatic time.

We share an island with them, and what happens there affects us. It’s the only forum here that doesn’t have the requirement that posts be directly DR related, because everything that happens there has the potential to reverberate to the east. If it’s Haitian related, it’s permitted.
 

bob saunders

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In normal times we have about 20 Haitian children at the school, some born in the DR and others direct from Haiti. We have two boys , one in Grade 5 and one in Kindergarten that were brought here by their great aunt, a Haitian woman with both American and Dominican citizenship. She owns a large Finca here in Jarabacoa and She said she try to rescue as many relatives as possible. Even in covid times we have about ten Haitian students. Several are taught in a teachers house because they can't do virtual classes as nobody in the house speaks Spanish and they all work. Thankfully all the children speak Spanish. The boy in Grade five speaks passable English and French as well. Nothing wrong with Haitians intelligence that can't be fixed by education and a functional government.
 

NanSanPedro

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In normal times we have about 20 Haitian children at the school, some born in the DR and others direct from Haiti. We have two boys , one in Grade 5 and one in Kindergarten that were brought here by their great aunt, a Haitian woman with both American and Dominican citizenship. She owns a large Finca here in Jarabacoa and She said she try to rescue as many relatives as possible. Even in covid times we have about ten Haitian students. Several are taught in a teachers house because they can't do virtual classes as nobody in the house speaks Spanish and they all work. Thankfully all the children speak Spanish. The boy in Grade five speaks passable English and French as well. Nothing wrong with Haitians intelligence that can't be fixed by education and a functional government.

Bob, does your school require any paperwork for the Haitian kids? That's been a big problem for me here with mine.
 

jollyroger

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Can they fit anymore people onto this obviously well made bridge? All I see are a collective of black people and smoke. Were they having a BBQ or something, kind of looks like fun
 
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bob saunders

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Bob, does your school require any paperwork for the Haitian kids? That's been a big problem for me here with mine.
Yes, we require a birth certificate for the child ( doesn't matter what country) and passports of parents. Haitian children without papers can attend public schools as well the only problem is without papers they can't graduate. We used to have a girl Z, that was abandoned by her Haitian mother and unofficially adopted by a Dominican woman. A canadian couple tried to officially adopt her but gave up after about four years because of the lack of a birth certificate and being unable to locate the birth mother made an international adoption impossible. Flash forward, Z is now 16, a beautiful doll of a teenager, fully Dominicanized, and some how her Dominican mother was able to get her a Dominican birth Certificate and claim her as her birth daughter. They look absolutely nothing alike, but what the hay.
 

PICHARDO

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May 15, 2003
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Haiti is collapsing for the 2,743,385th time.

Anything new in the news?


We all know Haiti is a failed state and as such there’s no other lower point for it to reach, other than total chaos.

The situation there can and will change once the right individuals take control of the so-called government and the outfits which support it.

The population will have little choice but to fall into place once that point is reached.

The problem is not if but when these specific individuals will make their move.

You can go either way on these individuals in a mixture of either populists or a fusion of a pragmatic as well as charismatic leader.

One type is already there aplenty, the other is a Haitian by family bloodline but from the outside of Haiti’s realm.

The takeover would be a simple sum coercion of the outside players first and foremost.
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
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Yes, we require a birth certificate for the child ( doesn't matter what country) and passports of parents. Haitian children without papers can attend public schools as well the only problem is without papers they can't graduate. We used to have a girl Z, that was abandoned by her Haitian mother and unofficially adopted by a Dominican woman. A canadian couple tried to officially adopt her but gave up after about four years because of the lack of a birth certificate and being unable to locate the birth mother made an international adoption impossible. Flash forward, Z is now 16, a beautiful doll of a teenager, fully Dominicanized, and some how her Dominican mother was able to get her a Dominican birth Certificate and claim her as her birth daughter. They look absolutely nothing alike, but what the hay.


This is quite plausible because the mother (a DR citizen) recognized and declared the minor as hers via a late declaration of birth. The Law as-is doesn’t provide that the mother and child must provide any dna tests to affirm this, unless either the mother or father questions their responsibility as parent via court.

As per DR Law recognition of a child imprints that individual with all responsibilities as the parent/guardian, which is what the Law cares about per child welfare.