Haitian Border Closed, Fuel Crisis

O

ohmmmm

Guest
Today the Haitian border was closed due to the fuel crisis there. In Cap Haitian, almost all the government offices and schools were closed as well. Things are going from bad to worse. A real national crisis is here. The USA kept support of the current President and its fingers in everything, but everything is falling apart and not working. Not sure what the future is, but people there have to eat. They have been beyond patient with the government and their struggle to live. But it is only getting worse as the horrible economy declines and declines. Very sad and horrific.
 
U

USA DOC

Guest
...of course USA has the fault for everything in Haiti...even from the beginning...……...Doc...…...
 
M

melphis

Guest
To bad the likes of the Clinton's and Sean Penn only show up in Haiti when the cameras are rolling and there is the possibility of some free cash for the foundation.
 
C

ctrob

Guest
Is all of their fuel shipped in? Any food coming in thru ports must be slowing down as well?

The Doms are probably going to have their hands full stopping large groups trying to cross.
 
B

Big

Guest
Is all of their fuel shipped in? Any food coming in thru ports must be slowing down as well?

The Doms are probably going to have their hands full stopping large groups trying to cross.
No fuel shipment , no electricity, most of their power is generated by diesel.
 
W

windeguy

Guest
Haiti has a government? Who knew... There is no solution to the problems there. None.
 
C

ctrob

Guest
Haiti has a government? Who knew... There is no solution to the problems there. None.
It could happen, but it would take the Haitian version of a Washington/Lincoln/Trump type leader to save them. Those people are rare. And they will most likely have to hit absolute rock bottom before that true leader would be allowed to step forward and make the necessary changes that are needed.

And "rock bottom" for Haiti might get pretty bad.
 
C

Cdn_Gringo

Guest
Is the border still closed? Did we ever ascertain which side initiated the closure?
 
L

Lucas61

Guest
Dominican Republic
According to the Dominican national press, the reason for the closure was to prevent transport of black market fuel, I would assume ingress of fuel. That was the specific reason; the general one being to contain civil unrest.
 
L

Lucas61

Guest
Today the Haitian border was closed due to the fuel crisis there. In Cap Haitian, almost all the government offices and schools were closed as well. Things are going from bad to worse. A real national crisis is here. The USA kept support of the current President and its fingers in everything, but everything is falling apart and not working. Not sure what the future is, but people there have to eat. They have been beyond patient with the government and their struggle to live. But it is only getting worse as the horrible economy declines and declines. Very sad and horrific.
My personal view on fuel: For cooking there are three methods based on social stratification: 1. "recho gas" Propane stove. This is the most expensive. I suspect that a numerical majority in the nation do not have "recho gas." 2. The next is "recho chabon." This method is likely the most common. It does not require gas but it is possible that the price of "chabon" could rise based on rising fuel costs. 3. The third represents the lowest stratification and will be found in rural areas and, even there, an outlier. That is "twa woch ak moso bwa." or three rocks with pieces of wood. Any market will sell a small bundle of "ti moso" that you can use as kindling. Generally three largish tree limbs are used. You push them in or pull them out in order to adjust the intensity of the flame. So I think that as far as the fuel shortage is concerned that it is not going to have a big effect on cooking. Those who are cooking with gas have the most money, and those who aren't will not be affected except possibly for those using "recho chabon." Probably those cooking over wood fire will not be affected at all. Now the question of transportation, that is the ELEPHANT in the room. These are the types of transport: a. motorcycles, b. tap-taps, c. various bus types, the ubiquitous "guagua," d. "machine" often but not always a big truck. I only have experience with the motorcycles. Almost every male in Haiti with a motorcycle has a dual function: personal transportation and employment. You can ask "Gen moto?" and flag down anyone. In cities and villages you do not negotiate because all the prices are set. For example, in Wanament, you pay 25 goud for short distances and 50 goud for long distances. Essentially, within the city, you always pay 25 goud (per person). If you get on with a friend you pay 50. The profit margin for the owner is razor thin. If the price goes up only a small amount, he has no profit, a little more, he cannot work; no food. If there is a shortage, then all rely on the next tier. The next tier are "ti machan" small merchants selling gas on the roadside. It is expensive and sometimes, not often, adulterated with water. When that runs out, very quickly, then tens of thousands of males with motorcycles do not eat. It does not take many days of not eating to lead to desperation and desperate acts. I was in
Wanament about a month ago on the very day when the single gas station (Estasyon Gas Nasyonal) closed down. That same day, all motorcycle fees doubled.
 
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T

Tricky

Guest
To bad the likes of the Clinton's and Sean Penn only show up in Haiti when the cameras are rolling and there is the possibility of some free cash for the foundation.
Just curious. How do you know the "likes of" those people only show up when the cameras are rolling. If the 'cameras aren't rolling' it would seem unlikely you know that they are there during those times.
 
M

mart1n

Guest
Just seen a video of burner out area with motor bikes and dead people spread all over. It is hard to look at .
 
N

NanSanPedro

Guest
Haitian problems need Haitian solutions. Punto.
No argument. Well intentioned Americans have screwed it up pretty badly. That however, doesn't absolve the Haitians of getting their sheet together.
 
B

Big

Guest
Yes it's officially a meltdown, I have been in and around Haiti but would not risk it for sometime. People are getting desperate and anyone that can flee has or is doing so.
 
R

rfp

Guest
My personal view on fuel: For cooking there are three methods based on social stratification: 1. "recho gas" Propane stove. This is the most expensive. I suspect that a numerical majority in the nation do not have "recho gas." 2. The next is "recho chabon." This method is likely the most common. It does not require gas but it is possible that the price of "chabon" could rise based on rising fuel costs. 3. The third represents the lowest stratification and will be found in rural areas and, even there, an outlier. That is "twa woch ak moso bwa." or three rocks with pieces of wood. Any market will sell a small bundle of "ti moso" that you can use as kindling. Generally three largish tree limbs are used. You push them in or pull them out in order to adjust the intensity of the flame. So I think that as far as the fuel shortage is concerned that it is not going to have a big effect on cooking. Those who are cooking with gas have the most money, and those who aren't will not be affected except possibly for those using "recho chabon." Probably those cooking over wood fire will not be affected at all. Now the question of transportation, that is the ELEPHANT in the room. These are the types of transport: a. motorcycles, b. tap-taps, c. various bus types, the ubiquitous "guagua," d. "machine" often but not always a big truck. I only have experience with the motorcycles. Almost every male in Haiti with a motorcycle has a dual function: personal transportation and employment. You can ask "Gen moto?" and flag down anyone. In cities and villages you do not negotiate because all the prices are set. For example, in Wanament, you pay 25 goud for short distances and 50 goud for long distances. Essentially, within the city, you always pay 25 goud (per person). If you get on with a friend you pay 50. The profit margin for the owner is razor thin. If the price goes up only a small amount, he has no profit, a little more, he cannot work; no food. If there is a shortage, then all rely on the next tier. The next tier are "ti machan" small merchants selling gas on the roadside. It is expensive and sometimes, not often, adulterated with water. When that runs out, very quickly, then tens of thousands of males with motorcycles do not eat. It does not take many days of not eating to lead to desperation and desperate acts. I was in
Wanament about a month ago on the very day when the single gas station (Estasyon Gas Nasyonal) closed down. That same day, all motorcycle fees doubled.
Thanks for this post, it is terrible to see this level of human suffering so close to our shores.

Sadly, there are no solutions, nothing will change