Haitians at USA/Mexico border

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
3,142
2,536
113
Jan 9, 2004
9,696
912
113
Sorry AE, but the headline and almost every single paragraph pertains to US politics involving the Haitian migrants.

This is not the only thread involving the US and ostensibly its politics. Numerous daily headline stories do and have done the same thing.
Some will succeed in crossing the border into the US. Most will fail. I'm sad for those that fail because they will have wasted what little resources they have.

For those that succeed, I hope they work hard in whatever job they can get.
The latest on the Haitians at the USA/Mexico border;



Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113
Interesting article on how and why so many Haitians have arrived there:
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/sep/18/haiti-migrants-us-texas-violence
The article mentions the route that the Haitians take and I have known of Cubans taking it. Flying to Ecuador legally and then crossing borders until they get to the US border. For sure it is organized. I knew a Cuban girl who did it and she posted it all on Facebook. When they flew to Ecuador and stayed there some time and then went country hoping and they spent some time in Panama which they really seemed to enjoy. At one point they went on a plane. A group of Cubans traveling together. I asked her about crossing the US border which was easy but was also when they still had the wet foot dry foot policy and Cubans could stay in the US. I think they have continued to let Cubans cross from what I have heard. I don’t know what to think regarding sending the Haitians back. They must have had some resources to be able to get there. What about Mexico. They let them cross the border into Mexico. They should keep them with same reasoning. That it shouldn’t be worth it helping them or not have enough border control.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
20,734
2,258
113
South Coast
Sorry AE, but the headline and almost every single paragraph pertains to US politics involving the Haitian migrants.

This is not the only thread involving the US and ostensibly its politics. Numerous daily headline stories do and have done the same thing.

The latest on the Haitians at the USA/Mexico border;



Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
I agree it’s a very fine line. Most responding get it. As long as it’s referring to Haitian immigration, I’m okay with it. What I didn’t want was going off on tangents about Biden’s policies/general USA immigration, etc.
 

MariaRubia

Well-known member
Jun 25, 2019
516
552
93
I think the reality is that these people are those with money. The poorer Haitians are the ones sneaking over the border to DR. The richer ones can afford a plane ticket and to pay for false papers or people to help them make it to the border. It's the same the world over, those with most resources are usually the ones who make these long journeys, the poorer ones can't afford to get out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cavok and aarhus

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113
I agree it’s a very fine line. Most responding get it. As long as it’s referring to Haitian immigration, I’m okay with it. What I didn’t want was going off on tangents about Biden’s policies/general USA immigration, etc.
I certainly think it’s a Haiti and even DR issue. It’s incredible so many got there. With zero money. Seeing the pictures is really shocking.
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
4,979
1,391
113
From the little reading I have done on the subject I learned: 1) The exodus from Haiti started 3 or 4 years ago. It's not a new thing, just on a fast track due to some changes (in immigration procedures.....).
2) One of the prime step off countries is Guatemala because of the land/walk route to Mexico.
 

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113
I think the reality is that these people are those with money. The poorer Haitians are the ones sneaking over the border to DR. The richer ones can afford a plane ticket and to pay for false papers or people to help them make it to the border. It's the same the world over, those with most resources are usually the ones who make these long journeys, the poorer ones can't afford to get out.
That’s probably true. Maybe I wouldn’t use richer as terminology. But they must have some resources or family in the US send some money. There are also many horror stories of what they sometimes have to do on the way through Latam and central America.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
20,734
2,258
113
South Coast

Haiti expresses concern for its citizens on the US-Mexico border.​

EFE
Port au Prince

The Government of Haiti expressed its concern this Sunday about the "difficult" situation of thousands of its citizens in a makeshift camp under the Del Rio international bridge, on the Texas-Mexico border, waiting to enter the United States , which prepare your deportation.
"We are very concerned about the extremely difficult conditions in which several thousand of our compatriots live on the border between the United States and Mexico," wrote the Prime Minister of Haiti, Ariel Henry , on his Twitter account.

Henry called on the national union to "give the country a chance" and prevent Haitians from continuing to experience this type of "humiliation."
"As we renew our full solidarity with them, we want to assure them that measures have already been taken to offer them a better welcome upon their return to the country," he continued.

"They will not be left behind," he promised, welcoming them with a proverb widely used by Haitians: "Lakay se Lakay (The house is still the house)."

Since the worsening of the socioeconomic and political crisis in 2018, several thousand Haitians have left their country to go to Mexico, the United States and the Dominican Republic, among others.

In the past, most Haitians who decided to leave the country were illiterate, but in recent times they are professionals and university students, leaving in search of a better life elsewhere.

In addition, hundreds of Haitians living in Latin America, especially in Chile, Brazil and Ecuador, are making a long journey through more than a dozen countries to try to reach the United States.

About 13,000 irregular immigrants, mostly Haitians, are being held by US immigration authorities in a makeshift camp under the international bridge that connects Del Río (Texas) with Ciudad Acuña (Mexico).

The migrants have been crossing into the United States since last Tuesday and have overwhelmed the immigration authorities, who improvised the camp while waiting to process asylum applications.

According to US media, the US Government is preparing to send multiple deportation flights to Haiti to discourage the massive arrival of citizens of this nation.

 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
20,734
2,258
113
South Coast

Haitian migrants reel off their misery in the hard journey to the US​



Natalia CANO
Tapachula, Mexico | AFP


Thousands of kilometers of road, whole days through mountains and jungles, assaults, shipwrecks. On their way to the United States, fleeing poverty, Haitian migrants unravel a tragedy.

Many embark on the adventure encouraged by family and friends who reached the goal, but who speak little of the misfortunes that await them , such as being trapped in Tapachula.

This city in southern Mexico became a funnel where tens of thousands of Haitians and Central Americans desperately seek a permit - which does not arrive - to advance towards the desired north and not be deported to Guatemala.

Tired of waiting and with the little money they carry, some continue their march undocumented, but at the border with the United States they are trapped again.

Thousands who cross the Rio Grande now crowd under a bridge that connects Ciudad Acuña (Mexico) and Del Río (Texas) to seek refuge in the United States. The hardships, aggravated by the covid-19 pandemic, do not stop.

- Stations of the Cross of ten countries -
Every night Murat "Dodo" Tilus is awakened by the excruciating pain in his arm caused by a fall on a Colombian mountain, during the journey to meet his brother in Miami. On August 8, he, his wife, a daughter and two grandchildren left Chile. A month later, after crossing through ten countries, they arrived in Tapachula. They had emigrated to Chile in 2017, taking advantage of the opening of that country after the 2010 earthquake that left 200,000 dead in Haiti.
"My house fell down, my family died, then I made an initiative with my wife to go to another country," Tilus, a 49-year-old electrician, told AFP.
But the "Chilean dream" began to fade in 2018 when the government imposed measures restricting migration.
In Chile now "it is very difficult to get the card (work permit), everything became more expensive, so people want to go out to seek a better life," he says.
Between him and his wife Rose Marie they raised about $ 5,000 to get to Tapachula.
They left Arica by bus and now share a room in a humble home, where four other Haitian families live. The city of 350,000 people is collapsed.
If it weren't for his brother's remittances, Tilus and his family would be on the streets, like other migrants.
Within four walls, the Tilus await the appointment they were given to process their refugee claim in December.
The Comar - entity that attends these requests - is overwhelmed. This year it has managed about 77,559 permits, exceeding the 70,400 for all of 2019.

Hundreds of migrants tried to advance in caravans this month, but were repressed by Mexican authorities. "I want to follow (the United States) legally," says Tilus hopefully. - "I did not want to leave" -
Like her cousin "Dodo", Judith Joseph is also looking to settle in the United States. He fled to Chile in 2017, after one of his three children was killed.
With difficulty walking, this 43-year-old diabetic and hypertensive woman left on July 10 and just arrived in Tapachula on September 6 along with her minor children.
The family says that they lived one of their worst moments in the Darien Gap, a jungle area between Colombia and Panama, where criminal groups operate and some colleagues drowned trying to cross a river.
"When we passed the jungle (...), where the mountain of Panama was, we crossed the river and people died there. It was very strong," recalls 11-year-old Samuel. Others were stripped of their few belongings.
The boy recalls his life in Haiti as something equally "difficult", with his mother working in a market.
"When I was with my grandmother, there were mice in the kitchen at night; when it was daytime there were always Haitian soldiers shooting outside the house," he says.
Judith is assisted by Samuel and Cristelle, eight, who help her walk and communicate in Spanish.
They live crammed with other people in a precarious room on the outskirts of Tapachula. With money they receive from relatives in the United States, they will pay the $ 75 rent, until they achieve refugee status and thus continue to the United States.

Unlike Central Americans, with a long history of undocumented migration, many Haitians present in this city seem to advance blindly.
My mother "lied to me and didn't tell me we were coming to Mexico, I didn't want to leave, I wanted to stay in Chile," Samuel laments.

 
  • Like
Reactions: cavok

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113

Haiti expresses concern for its citizens on the US-Mexico border.​

EFE
Port au Prince

The Government of Haiti expressed its concern this Sunday about the "difficult" situation of thousands of its citizens in a makeshift camp under the Del Rio international bridge, on the Texas-Mexico border, waiting to enter the United States , which prepare your deportation.
"We are very concerned about the extremely difficult conditions in which several thousand of our compatriots live on the border between the United States and Mexico," wrote the Prime Minister of Haiti, Ariel Henry , on his Twitter account.

Henry called on the national union to "give the country a chance" and prevent Haitians from continuing to experience this type of "humiliation."
"As we renew our full solidarity with them, we want to assure them that measures have already been taken to offer them a better welcome upon their return to the country," he continued.

"They will not be left behind," he promised, welcoming them with a proverb widely used by Haitians: "Lakay se Lakay (The house is still the house)."

Since the worsening of the socioeconomic and political crisis in 2018, several thousand Haitians have left their country to go to Mexico, the United States and the Dominican Republic, among others.

In the past, most Haitians who decided to leave the country were illiterate, but in recent times they are professionals and university students, leaving in search of a better life elsewhere.

In addition, hundreds of Haitians living in Latin America, especially in Chile, Brazil and Ecuador, are making a long journey through more than a dozen countries to try to reach the United States.

About 13,000 irregular immigrants, mostly Haitians, are being held by US immigration authorities in a makeshift camp under the international bridge that connects Del Río (Texas) with Ciudad Acuña (Mexico).

The migrants have been crossing into the United States since last Tuesday and have overwhelmed the immigration authorities, who improvised the camp while waiting to process asylum applications.

According to US media, the US Government is preparing to send multiple deportation flights to Haiti to discourage the massive arrival of citizens of this nation.

When you see how they organize themselves under and around that bridge it looks sort of similar to when you see parts of Puerto Prince. I don’t mean to be funny but they may prefer to be right there than in Haiti. Less violence and better chance of getting some food and even immediate health care.
 

Aguaita29

Silver
Jul 27, 2011
2,465
81
48
I don't really thing it's trafficking. Haitians go to Latin America legally. The illegal part is getting into the USA. They are doing it voluntarily.
I think you're right! Trafficking usually involves fraud, coercion or force. Smuggling, on the other hand, is done voluntarily.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NanSanPedro

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113
I think you're right! Trafficking usually involves fraud, coercion or force. Smuggling, on the other hand, is done voluntarily.
That is right of course. I am not sure about the definition. But is it legal the people facilitating them crossing borders illegally. What is the term for that then ?
 

Aguaita29

Silver
Jul 27, 2011
2,465
81
48
That is right of course. I am not sure about the definition. But is it legal the people facilitating them crossing borders illegally. What is the term for that then ?
That's smuggling. Yeah, it's illegal to facilitate them crossing borders that way, but for them, if they ask for refuge, it doesn't matter if they've entered legally or illegally. They're not supposed to take into account how they got there.
 

aarhus

Traveller
Jun 10, 2008
2,438
890
113
That's smuggling. Yeah, it's illegal to facilitate them crossing borders that way, but for them, if they ask for refuge, it doesn't matter if they've entered legally or illegally. They're not supposed to take into account how they got there.
Ok I see what you mean. The refugees are there now and it doesn’t matter how they got there. But apart from that I also meant they should be looking at those people facilitating it when that is done on a larger scale.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aguaita29

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
4,653
2,241
113
Apparently the U.S. has begun flying the Haitians immigrants back to Haiti. Lets see, 14000 divided by......

 
  • Like
Reactions: AlaPlaya

NY2STI

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2020
362
485
63
the Prime Minister of Haiti, Ariel Henry...called on the national union to "give the country a chance...
"As we renew our full solidarity with them, we want to assure them that measures have already been taken to offer them a better welcome upon their return to the country," he continued.

Did he actually say that with a straight face?
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
3,142
2,536
113
the Prime Minister of Haiti, Ariel Henry...called on the national union to "give the country a chance...
"As we renew our full solidarity with them, we want to assure them that measures have already been taken to offer them a better welcome upon their return to the country," he continued.

Did he actually say that with a straight face?

It's politician-speak, a universal language of BS.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: cavok

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
10,298
1,040
113
Apparently, these people are going to be happy to land in Port-au-Prince. Lets look at the bright side. At least they visited several countries during the last few months. Most people in Haiti never leave Haiti for anything during the course of their lives and much less Haitians get to be in several countries.